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Now You See Me


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#1

TWoP Gadget

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Posted May 30, 2013 @ 8:35 AM

 

The world's greatest illusionists - "The Four Horsemen" - pull off a series of daring heists against corrupt business leaders during their performances. The super-team of illusionists shower the stolen profits on their audiences while staying one step ahead of an elite FBI squad in a game of cat-and-mouse.


Edited by TWoP Gadget, May 30, 2013 @ 8:36 AM.


#2

GaT

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Posted May 31, 2013 @ 6:51 PM

I just got back from seeing this. I liked it, but I guessed part of the ending pretty early in the film, & I don't really understand what happened to the magicians at the end. They had me guessing whether or not Michael Caine or Morgan Freeman's characters were in on the plot the entire movie, so that was good. 


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#3

Teagan1

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Posted May 31, 2013 @ 10:25 PM

Wow, GaT, you must be good--my husband always figures out plots early on and he said he didn't see this one coming.

 

Our family loved it.  Sure, some of it was convoluted, but I was having too much fun to care.


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#4

GaT

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Posted May 31, 2013 @ 11:27 PM

I thought they were pushing a little too hard to try & get everyone to think the Interpol agent was the 5th Horseman, so I knew it was a distraction :-)


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#5

Teagan1

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Posted Jun 1, 2013 @ 8:57 AM

.......so I knew it was a distraction :-)

 

Heh.  I see what you did there  :)

 

Boy, I'm glad I didn't read the reviews before I saw this or I might have skipped it.  I thought it was great summer fun and well done!  There are two parts, though, to why I loved this:  1.)  I've always thought that really good magicians were some of the best artists out there--I know I'm being deceived, but it still astounds me every time and 2.) I've always enjoyed how movie writers put together these crazy plots.  I just loved the "how'd they do it" reveal in Ocean's 11 and others like it, and that was interesting to me here, too.  I always think "what kind of mind can come up with this?!" 

 

I don't think I've ever seen Jesse Eisenberg in anything else (never saw the Face Book movie, the name of which is escaping me right now). Does he always speak in such quick, clipped bursts?  Or was it just for the character?  It took me a bit of time to get used to it and while I think it worked for the character, I don't know if I could listen to in every movie.

 

I also thought the cast was fantastic. 


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#6

Katie89

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Posted Jun 1, 2013 @ 1:19 PM

I, too, agree with the general consensus in this post. Now You See Me was good ole summer fun. The storyline was a teeny tiny bit fresh, what made it for me was the casting. As an avid Zombieland fan, I enjoy a little too much seeing Columbus and Tallahassee team back up again, However, I do think I may need to see it again to full grasp the motives behind the characters. For instance, why was Michael Caine hanging out with these magicians? He just so happened to be the benefactor they chose for reason unbeknownst to him? And call ME crazy but

Spoiler

 

Oh and that is Jesse Eisenberg's delivery. Short, quipped, and anxious speaking patterns while being sarcastic. :]


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#7

GaT

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Posted Jun 1, 2013 @ 5:59 PM

 

For instance, why was Michael Caine hanging out with these magicians?

 

I didn't understand that either & that's why I couldn't decided if he was a good guy or a bad guy (maybe that's why they did it that way?) When the took his money, I couldn't decide if that was a plan he was in on, or they were really stealing from him. Same thing with Morgan Freeman. 

 

I still don't know what The Eye is or what happened at the carousel. 


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#8

Teagan1

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Posted Jun 1, 2013 @ 7:03 PM

When the took his money, I couldn't decide if that was a plan he was in on, or they were really stealing from him. Same thing with Morgan Freeman.

 

The way I saw it, and I could be wrong, neither of them were in on it.  Michael Kane's character looked way too depressed in that bar afterward and I think Freeman's character was singled out to be the fall guy because he was making money by telling how the tricks are done. 

 

I think The Eye was just some secret society like the Illuminati, the Freemasons or the Knights Templar.  I, personally, didn't think too hard about what happened at the carousel.  I just figured since the whole plan was so dramatic, he added some drama and mystical nature to the reveal.  Maybe I'll see it again, too, to look for more details that I might of missed. 

 

Now You See Me was good ole summer fun.

 

That's exactly how I saw it. 


Edited by Teagan1, Jun 1, 2013 @ 7:03 PM.

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#9

Redtracer

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Posted Jun 1, 2013 @ 8:09 PM

I don't have much of a desire to watch this movie again (not that I hated it, but it's not really memorable enough to watch again), but I would be interested in knowing when the final twist actually holds up within the context of the film. If Mark Ruffalo is playing a (very, very) long game, that means that he's been in on everything from the very beginning. Therefore, the whole "gruff FBI agent" schtick is an act, and he has no reason to keep the act going when he's not in the company of another person. Does he appear by himself in any scenes? The closest one I can think of is when he's in the room while Melanie Laurent is sleeping, but his reaction to the book she was holding was rather ambiguous, IIRC. If there are any scenes of him doing the FBI thing by himself, then the ending falls apart. (Not that it stands up under much scrutiny anyway, but at least it would show a bit of effort on the screenwriters' parts.)

 

I thought for sure the fact that Henley was always wearing gloves was going to come into play somehow. I kept noticing them in every scene, but I guess they were just a character quirk. Also, everyone here also picked the seven of diamonds, right? I did, and then I immediately felt like a dope because I knew I'd been easily manipulated into picking that specific card.


Edited by Redtracer, Jun 1, 2013 @ 8:47 PM.

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#10

shego219

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Posted Jun 1, 2013 @ 9:55 PM

As an avid Zombieland fan, I enjoy a little too much seeing Columbus and Tallahassee team back up again

 

I think I was the only person in my theater who laughed out loud when Merritt asked Daniel if they'd ever met before.

 

Also, everyone here also picked the seven of diamonds, right?

 

I did indeed.  A bit embarrassing to know that after years of studying card tricks I'm still duped easily.  I blame Jesse Eisenberg.

 

I got a bad feeling when Jack's calling card tarot motif was Death at the beginning but brushed it off, which was another mistake of my judgement (although this movie taught me if I wish hard enough the character I hoped wasn't actually dead won't actually be dead).  I was also surprised to learn Jack was played by Dave Franco -- I've never seen any of his work, but I at least know he's an actor and that he looks somewhat like his brother.  I also spent the entire movie trying to figure out who was playing Alma and why she looked familiar ("Au revoir, Shoshanna!").  Even more of an all-star cast than I bargained for.


Edited by shego219, Jun 1, 2013 @ 10:03 PM.

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#11

savinggrace

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Posted Jun 2, 2013 @ 9:47 AM

I thought the film was entertaining but I felt unsatisfied with the ending. The dramatic build-up with the Horsemen on top of the building seemed to fall flat.

 

I thought the French cop was completely unnecessary. If she was only written as a romantic interest for Ruffalo's character that was a fail because I saw no reason for her to be attracted to him in light of how rude he was throughout the film.

 

The scene on the bridge made no kind of sense. Why orchestrate such a risky  fake death?

 

True to Hollywood form, the men come in varying ages and degrees of attractiveness but every significant female character has to be model perfect whether she be a magician, a French cop or a TV production assistant.

 

 

 

If Mark Ruffalo is playing a (very, very) long game, that means that he's been in on everything from the very beginning. Therefore, the whole "gruff FBI agent" schtick is an act, and he has no reason to keep the act going when he's not in the company of another person
 

 

 

His character also needed Oscar-level acting skills and the wisdom of Solomon starting from age 12.

 

 

 

 

I think I was the only person in my theater who laughed out loud when Merritt asked Daniel if they'd ever met before.

 

You also might be the only person who remembered the characters names:)


Edited by savinggrace, Jun 2, 2013 @ 9:52 AM.

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#12

ribboninthesky1

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Posted Jun 2, 2013 @ 12:34 PM

Yeah, I saw this about an hour ago, and can't recall most of the character names. 

 

Also, everyone here also picked the seven of diamonds, right? I did, and then I immediately felt like a dope because I knew I'd been easily manipulated into picking that specific card.

 

Same here.

 

Does he appear by himself in any scenes? The closest one I can think of is when he's in the room while Melanie Laurent is sleeping, but his reaction to the book she was holding was rather ambiguous, IIRC.

 

I think that might be the only scene where he is not interacting with someone, even if he is physically alone.  

 

I thought the French cop was completely unnecessary. If she was only written as a romantic interest for Ruffalo's character that was a fail because I saw no reason for her to be attracted to him in light of how rude he was throughout the film.

 

Not only that, but she seemed to be telegraphed to have some meaningful insight into the magicians and their motivations, but not really.  I guess since she was pretty with a French accent, I was supposed to perceive her as some deep character, when she was as broadly and superficially drawn as everyone else, save maybe Mark Ruffalo. 

 

In any case, in a season of introspective comic book heros, dystopian and/or post-apocalyptic societies, remakes and young adult book adaptations, this was a nice, fluffy, entertaining film that managed to be a wee bit grown-up, despite the convoluted story.  I totally understand  why more people preferred to see this over After Earth.  Especially since there didn't appear to be much media hype for the film, and the trailer didn't tell us the entire story.  

 

That said, this doesn't strike me as a "word of mouth" sort of film, so I'd be surprised if it doesn't drop off considerably at the box office the following weeks. 


Edited by ribboninthesky1, Jun 2, 2013 @ 12:35 PM.

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#13

heyitsme87

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Posted Jun 2, 2013 @ 3:55 PM

The way I saw it, and I could be wrong, neither of them were in on it.  Michael Kane's character looked way too depressed in that bar afterward and I think Freeman's character was singled out to be the fall guy because he was making money by telling how the tricks are done.

 

yes, neither were in on it. They were both targeted because of their parts in the death of the FBI agents father. Freemans character was targeted because he show of debunking the magicians is what ultimately led to the fathers death which was him drowning in a trick gone wrong after trying to rebuld his image that freemans character shattered.

 

The french bank was targeted because they didnt pay out the claim after the father died and the benefactor guy tied into that somehow.

 

I was rolling my eyes at the french cop. I think her character was completely unecessary and i hated when she turned into a romantic interest.


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#14

NoWillToResist

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Posted Jun 6, 2013 @ 3:25 PM

If Mark Ruffalo is playing a (very, very) long game, that means that he's been in on everything from the very beginning. Therefore, the whole "gruff FBI agent" schtick is an act, and he has no reason to keep the act going when he's not in the company of another person.

 

What bothered my husband and I was the fact that he managed to land the case. I seem to recall that when he was approached about it, he said it wasn't really his type of case but the FBI guy insisted. So, there was apparently a chance that the case would have gone to someone else, which would fuck all his plans to hell.

 

Also, I call bullshit that no one knew (or ever mentioned) that the old, dead magician had had a kid.

 

I didn't *mind* the movie, but I honestly have to say that I feel it's...quite forgettable.


Edited by NoWillToResist, Jun 6, 2013 @ 3:26 PM.

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#15

goodlucinda

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Posted Jun 12, 2013 @ 2:27 PM

Huge missed opportunity!!!  Terrific cast, but giant thumbs down for skipping straight to "what can we do with CGI" and forgetting to write an actual script.  


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#16

taiko

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Posted Jun 13, 2013 @ 9:11 PM

Yes I saw the 7.

What bothers me was the first Vegas show and how the FBI agent got Michael Caine to bankroll four street performers getting there in one year. And knowing a French customer of a certain bank will vacation there and used his comp'ed tickets. The New Orleans show and New York shows I understand because they were like an Oprah live audience hopping to win the lottery
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#17

kcblue86

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Posted Jun 13, 2013 @ 10:22 PM

What bothered my husband and I was the fact that he managed to land the case. I seem to recall that when he was approached about it, he said it wasn't really his type of case but the FBI guy insisted. So, there was apparently a chance that the case would have gone to someone else, which would fuck all his plans to hell.

Didn't someone (Freeman?) make a comment when they suspected the French girl that it only appeared they were assigned to the case, when in fact it had been one they wanted? It would be easy to manipulate events to get the case to Ruffalo, considering all the other manipulations he was capable of.

 

I didn't even make the connection that Harrelson and Eisenberg had been in Zombieland together. I was too busy being amused at Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine being in a non-Batman movie together. This movie really did have an all-star cast.


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#18

ribboninthesky1

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Posted Jun 13, 2013 @ 10:28 PM

 

What bothers me was the first Vegas show and how the FBI agent got Michael Caine to bankroll four street performers getting there in one year. And knowing a French customer of a certain bank will vacation there and used his comp'ed tickets. 

 

 

 

Regarding Caine bankrolling, that's never explained.  I chalked it up to the convoluted plot to set him up as having suspicious motives until we find out who he really is.  

 

The Frenchman was hypnotized way before the Vegas show, so they were counting on him being there, especially since they'd already robbed the bank and had the money the night of the show.  I believe that was part of Woody Harrelson's specialty as a mentalist - it was implied that he hypnotically suggested the man come to Vegas, to that show. 


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#19

questionfear1

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Posted Jun 14, 2013 @ 12:04 PM

Regarding Caine bankrolling, that's never explained.  I chalked it up to the convoluted plot to set him up as having suspicious motives until we find out who he really is.  

 

The Frenchman was hypnotized way before the Vegas show, so they were counting on him being there, especially since they'd already robbed the bank and had the money the night of the show.  I believe that was part of Woody Harrelson's specialty as a mentalist - it was implied that he hypnotically suggested the man come to Vegas, to that show. 

 

 

 

 

I think it's also safe to assume they were instructed to target Caine's character for funding. Considering how flashy their Vegas show was, it's not surprising they were able to hook him with the promise of a hugely successful magic show.

 

I was thinking about the Ruffalo character and the FBI, and I would guess he had multiple backup plans if he wasn't the agent assigned to the case. My guess is that he would have gone from being gruff and anti-magic to being "interested" in cracking the case and found a way to get assigned...having it forced on him just makes him fly that much lower under the radar.


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#20

corvus13

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Posted Jun 15, 2013 @ 6:07 PM

I loved the script for this film, I wouldn't be surprised to see an Oscar nom for screenwriting.  The romance angle was just rote, but the rest of it was super.


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#21

spanky91088

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Posted Jun 20, 2013 @ 7:59 AM

I unashamedly LOVE this movie. It may be cheesy and completely impossible, but it was one of those films that you walk out thinking, "I wanna do magic! I wanna rob banks! Let's go learn some tricks!!" (or maybe that was the beer talking). Regardless, it was a fun movie.

 

My ONE problem with it was something I actually couldn't put my finger on until I read someone's comment on another board. I walked away feeling unsettled somehow. And it wasn't the unethical, insane concept of a decades long scam to put an innocent man in jail. Mark Ruffalo's character was nearly impossible to connect with, particularly after the twist was revealed; which was weird for me because I LOVE Mark. It was the magicians I found myself drawn to, and once their act was over, that was it. They disappear on the Carousel of Magic and are just...gone.

 

It was at that point I realized...I didn't care about Mark's character at ALL. I didn't care that his dad died, I didn't care if he was suffering some emotional trauma, I don't care that he's in some secret society, I don't care that he's some Danny Ocean-level mastermind, I don't care that he's some kind of Super-Magician. I wanted to know if Henley and Daniel got together; if Jack went back to pickpocketing, if Daniel and Merritt ever stopped being SO antagonistic toward each other. Did any of them team up and try to stay on the big stage, or did they all go back to petty street magic?

 

I felt like I was lured in by a story about 4 street magicians coming together to perform the greatest magic the world had ever seen...when really it was a story about a bitter guy avenging his father. Which is fine, and you HAVE to market that way to keep the plot twist intact, but then you've gotta make your surprise main character a bit more relatable to the audience.


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#22

Cress

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Posted Jun 20, 2013 @ 2:05 PM

Did any of them team up and try to stay on the big stage, or did they all go back to petty street magic?

At the end, didn't one of them do a voiceover saying how they're still looking for great magicians to join them and do new illusions? I think it was supposed to imply that they're still in the magic secret society, only now they're in charge of looking for new recruits. I believe the team are still together, but the concept of the secret society is so vague, they couldn't show us what they're doing now. They're just somewhere lurking in the shadows doing secret things. I don't think they disbanded or went back to ordinary life.


Edited by Cress, Jun 20, 2013 @ 2:05 PM.

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#23

Princess Aldrea

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Posted Jun 20, 2013 @ 4:58 PM

 I wanted to know if Henley and Daniel got together; 
I wanted to know that, too! 

 

I was really confused by the bit at the end. Mark Ruffalo's character was a member of the secret society and he taunted Morgan Freeman's character about how he probably tried to get into the secret society but failed and they paid no attention to him. Freeman's character seemed to have no idea that said society was even real. So maybe the society snubbed Freeman's character and Freeman's character didn't care since he didn't even think it was real in the first place. Well, why didn't they take Freeman's character in? He's clearly brilliant and can figure out tricks just by looking at them. He was probably a great magician as well. Why not let him in before he sold out? 

 

And why was Freeman's character given the harshest penalty? He seems the least responsible for what happened. And even if Freeman's character is convicted, why would the other four get off free? Everyone knows who they are. Why use their real names? Are they going to be in hiding forever? And can't the government take the money back? They know it was stolen even if they can't punish the people who received it. 

 

Also, the French woman was a disaster. First she goes into it honestly believing magic is the answer to everything and then she finds out just what Ruffalo's character did to innocent people for stupid reasons and she just lets him get away with it? Because she has a crush? Even though he was an ass to her pretty much the entire movie? And why was she annoyed at him that she had no jurisdiction to go arrest people and made him promise not to follow the laws of jurisdiction about it? Why was she even in the movie? I would have preferred to not have that final scene with them getting together in it. It was not cute or romantic but horrifying. 

 

I knew that Jack wasn't dead but they dragged on that reveal so long that I started to wonder. 


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#24

chailey

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Posted Jun 24, 2013 @ 10:25 AM

And why was Freeman's character given the harshest penalty? He seems the least responsible for what happened.

 

Freeman was the one that started it all by exposing all of Ruffalo's father's act.  The bank, the safe manufacturer, and the insurer wouldn't have been involved to begin with if not for Freeman's character. Showing how an odd magic trick is really done is one thing, but it seems that he deliberately set out to destroy Ruffalo's father by exposing not just one or two tricks, but HIS ENTIRE ACT.  Taking into account that it can take years to perfect certain tricks and build a career in magic, Freeman's character seemed rather vindictive.  I'm assuming that it was personal in some way, though there was nothing in the script that said that.  The destruction of Ruffalo's father's career, did lead him to attempt a risky trick in his comeback, and thus, his death  I can see why Ruffalo would blame him above all others.

 

 

It was the magicians I found myself drawn to, and once their act was over, that was it. They disappear on the Carousel of Magic and are just...gone.

 

 

Yes. I enjoyed the film, but would have liked a few more scenes of personal interactions between the 4 Horseman.  I was far more interested in them than Ruffalo. Also thought that the film cheated a bit at the end (no, I don't mean all of the unrealistic stunts--I can handwave that in this type of film) when it insinuated but never really verified the existence of "real" magic.  What happened to the 4 Horsemen?

 

Would love to see a sequel, but don't suppose it will be a big enough hit for that.


Edited by chailey, Jun 24, 2013 @ 10:32 AM.

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#25

Mars477

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Posted Jun 24, 2013 @ 10:38 AM

Lets be honest here.  Morgan Freeman is walking out of jail before the week is over.  Why?  The guy did nothing wrong (that is, illegal), and I doubt that framing him for stealing the money is going to hold up to a reasonably competent investigation.  Plus, I highly doubt that the cell he is being held in is part of the New York correctional system: as dilapidated as it is, using it is probably violating a number of civil rights regulations.  So... I guess Mark Ruffalo kidnapped him, which also happens to be illegal.

 

And yeah, I kinda like Melanie Laurent, but what was the point of her in this movie?


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#26

Kolaka

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Posted Jun 27, 2013 @ 8:31 AM

It was fun but falls apart if you think about it too long.  The money from the French bank could probably be traced if people try to use it/deposit it (serial numbers), the money transferred from Michael Caine's account was done electronically (traceable) - plus with the thefts being so visible, agencies or whatever would be on the look out.  Maybe not all of the euros would be recovered but a good portion and probably all of Caine's money, unless the receipients realllly know how to transfer/hide money.  Probably the only money to not be recovered would be the $ from the safe, unless all of it was in Freeman's car?  I wasn't sure.  So the point was just to inconvenience/annoy Caine and the French bank.

 

And yeah, the whole case agains Morgan Freeman would never hold up (and the punishment didn't fit the crime, IMO).  How did his character not know Ruffalo would be the dead magician's son?  He seemed to know everything about him (the father); it was in the paper, would have been a logical conclusion IMO.  Just seemed a weird reveal, I was already thinking it before they showed the son in the paper.

 

I figured Ruffalo was behind it - he was too bumbling - and when they didn't open the safe when it was first "recovered" I knew for sure.

 

Harrellson and Eisenberg were obviously the biggest stars of the 4 horsemen, once they were all together the other two barely got any lines, though at least Franco got a fun fight scene.  I would have liked to see a bit more of them in action separately.

 

I figured the carousel was to give us some "real" magic after showing how all of the tricks happened, though that was fun too.


Edited by Kolaka, Jun 27, 2013 @ 8:33 AM.

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#27

lacey81

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Posted Jun 28, 2013 @ 11:50 PM

I just saw this, and while I really liked it a lot, I agree that I wanted more time spent on the 4 Horsemen and less on the FBI agent. It was super entertaining, but the best parts were the Horsemen interacting with each other.


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#28

shego219

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Posted Jul 8, 2013 @ 10:12 AM

I saw this movie a second time to see how it holds up, so you get two more of my cents... which actually turned out to be longer than I expected, so bear with me.

 

*Not super important but something I noticed -- Etienne's [the French show-goer who "robbed" the first bank] signature on the card that appears in the bank is noticeably different than the signature he puts on the card Daniel offers him before the heist (in Vegas he ends with a swoop to underline his name, which doesn't appear on the card forged by the Horsemen).  Additionally, he folds his ticket stub in half while the ticket that shows up in the French vault is unfolded.

 

*I also find it interesting that Arthur (Michael Caine) offered Thaddeus (Morgan Freeman) $3.5 million and then wound up with $4 million when the Horsemen cleaned him out.  If Thaddeus had taken him up on that offer Arthur would have really been ruined.

 

*I also for some inexplicable reason realized the Horsemen's last names can be made into the acronym WARM (Widler Atlas Reeves McKinney).  I still have no idea why I realized that but my brain wouldn't let it go, so enjoy that stupid tidbit.

 

*Thaddeus talks an annoyingly large game for a man who winds up not being the mastermind.  He delivers a lot of ominous lines; specifically he tells Arthur this con has been years in the making.  He's right, but if he can divine that, why doesn't he figure Dylan is the dead magician's son?  It's probably part of his egotism that Dylan criticizes at the end, acting like he knows more than what's going on, but it seemed really jarring once I knew how his storyline ended (although I agree he probably wasn't in a real jail in his final scenes).

 

*Holy Exposition, Batman!  I wouldn't have minded if it hadn't always been Dylan asking what was going on because, dude, you know what's going on.  Asking Thaddeus about the magician who was actually his father and then making an uncomfortable joke about his death was even more cringe-worthy.  It's a good thing I don't have a magic parent's death to avenge because I would have snapped, "I KNOW ALREADY!" after the third or fourth time someone explained something.

 

*Speaking of uncomfortable jokes, I missed the Tranny Tuesday comment the first go-round.  Yeck.

 

*Apart from him seeing Alma sleeping with the Eye book as mentioned, Ruffalo has one tiny scene where he's absolutely alone -- the morning after the Mardi Gras case wherein he's drinking coffee and popping Aleve in the kitchen.  No scenes of him "detecting" or working alone, so I'd say the twist holds up in that respect.

 

*Minor quibble -- at the very end when the Horsemen are about to get on the carousel, there's a close-up shot of Henley and Daniel holding hands.  In the very next shot, nobody's holding hands with anybody, so that point of that shot was...?

 


So, there was apparently a chance that the case would have gone to someone else, which would fuck all his plans to hell.

 

YMMV, but I would argue that being on the case was a disadvantage to Dylan.  He constantly had to bumble himself, which was advantageous in that he could control how the investigation was being led, but I get the feeling if he wasn't on the case he could have been somewhere else behind the scenes pulling the strings.  He still would have been inside/one step ahead of the FBI, and he was already (presumably) monitoring the Horsemen so he could have kept their paths from crossing in other ways.  (Or maybe I'm putting too much faith in his abilities.)

 

 

Why was she even in the movie? I would have preferred to not have that final scene with them getting together in it. It was not cute or romantic but horrifying. 

 

The ending was kind of horrifying for me too.  Here's a guy who's been lying to you literally the entire movie.  His life for the past 30-some years has been shaped by plans for revenge.  You have no idea who he really is or what he's really like since the FBI guy has been an act.  So you choose to... date him?  OK.  I probably would have put him in jail, but that's your choice.  It also seemed to me that Ruffalo played Dylan slightly different in that last scene (less sure of himself, stumbling over his words) and I can't decide if he was playing him as nervous of being arrested/rejected or if he was hinting that Dylan was by nature not much like his FBI persona.

 

All that said, I do still enjoy this movie.  It was fun, and I actually would like a sequel to see what the Horsemen are up to now, possibly with a subplot of Thaddeus and Arthur teaming up to hunt Dylan down for making them look bad (although that's making me think "Ocean's 12," which... no.  I don't want that again).

 

*Edited because typos.  :(


Edited by shego219, Jul 8, 2013 @ 10:18 AM.

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#29

Princess Aldrea

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Posted Jul 8, 2013 @ 6:35 PM

*Minor quibble -- at the very end when the Horsemen are about to get on the carousel, there's a close-up shot of Henley and Daniel holding hands. In the very next shot, nobody's holding hands with anybody, so that point of that shot was...?
I think it was to imply that they had gotten together or were going to.
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#30

ElymianDucat

ElymianDucat

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Posted Jul 9, 2013 @ 10:47 AM

*I also find it interesting that Arthur (Michael Caine) offered Thaddeus (Morgan Freeman) $3.5 million and then wound up with $4 million when the Horsemen cleaned him out. If Thaddeus had taken him up on that offer Arthur would have really been ruined.


The Horsemen clean out his bank account. That is why they needed his passwords and the answers to his security questions. So they stole most of his cash, but they didn't touch all the rest of his assets, like the ownership of his company, his properties, his stock portfolio, etc.

The guy will have serious liquidity issues for a while, but he was hardly wiped out.
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