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Amanda Knox: The Unanswered Questions


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#1

beavertoof

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 9:09 AM

Caught most of this on CNN last night. Also watched the Diane Sawyer interview a week or so ago.

 

I have followed this case somewhat over the years, though I certainly do not consider myself an expert on it.

 

My take is that she is totally innocent, but is unfortunately one of these people that has a really hard time communicating well.

 

I can see while watching her try to explain herself why some people would either have a hard time believing her, or just flat out think she is lying.

 

It is a travesty what happened to the poor gal that was murdered, and Amanda as well. The case seems pretty simple, and they got the guy in prison (tho it seems his sentence was pretty short). Yet, they are still obsessed with Amanda over there. Unless there is something else we don't know, it seems like a modern day "burn the witch" frenzy.

 

I would like to hear Meredith's family's take on it.. why do they still believe Amanda was involved... from what I have seen of the actual evidence, it is hard to imagine why they would hang on to that.



#2

toogoodtobetrue

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 10:37 AM

Chris Cuomo was a smug little jerk during the interview. At times it felt like a harsh interrogation session and at other times it felt like I was watching someone's therapy session. She is quite clearly innocent, but the news media continue to treat her as if she could be guilty in order to attract higher ratings.

One thing I am certain about-- she needs professional therapy. It seems like she has PTSD and is hanging on by a thread. I am worried for her.

Edited by toogoodtobetrue, May 8, 2013 @ 10:37 AM.


#3

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 10:45 AM

On one hand she comes off as someone who WAS shy and/or led  a sheltered life. But that type of personalty wouldn't do things like become an exchange student in a completely different culture or country. On the other hand she does come off as covering something up.  Personally I think there were more drugs involved at the time of the incident that were discovered or showed up on tests. If she was a 'straight arrow' my guess that a small amount of what ever affected her greatly and/or didn't come up in any drug screens or crime scene evidence.



#4

toogoodtobetrue

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 11:04 AM

http://www.rollingst...a-knox-20110627

I wrote a long reply but this new system ate it and I'm not about to retype it on my iPad so please read this article if you are unconvinced about Amanda.

#5

novhappy

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 11:33 AM

Her voice in the interview was intolerable-with that hysterical, almost-crying pitch to it.  She sounds a bit immature and riduiculous.  She was in a drug and sex-fueled sitution that went very wrong, somehow, spent a lot of time in jail. I can't believe she can't discuss this more maturely.



#6

toogoodtobetrue

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 11:56 AM

Novhappy, what evidence do you have to prove that she was in a drug and sex fueled situation that went wrong?

#7

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 12:48 PM

Seriously?  Are you only reading the Italian tabloids?  The only sex that we know of involved Amanda and her boyfriend in a separate apartment and then apparently Rudy Guede sexually assaulted Kircher.  The most compelling bit of evidence or non-evidence is the lack of DNA from Amanda.  If she were involved in some sex game involving Kircher and Guede then her DNA would have been all over the place much like Guede's.



#8

Nell Huxleigh

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 6:45 PM

I still can't believe that anyone considers this case unexplained. A drifter with a history of breaking into places using the same method had DNA and footprints and fingerprints all over the place. No, a young woman and her Harry Potteresque boyfriend of a few weeks instead decide to join in on some violent rape orgy with a stranger and then these young college students manage to clean up all evidence linking them to the case and leave all the evidence against Guede.

She has to do interviews because all the money her family has spent defending her against the Kafka-esque persecution.

#9

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 7:32 PM

Well, I still consider this case unexplained.  That doesn't mean I think Amanda Knox is guilty, but I do feel like she was either involved in some way or there is more to this than she is telling.  Some of the strange things I've come across (like her and her boyfriend turning off their cell phones or the delay in calling the police) lead me to believe that. And, while obviously not evidence of murder, I find something unsettling about Amanda Knox and am missing the whole "naive, wholesome girl next door" image that the American media is pushing.



#10

Nell Huxleigh

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 9:51 PM

It is unexplained that two people on a date turned off their cell phones? How isn't she a wholesome girl next door? Seems like other than being bizarrely accused of taking part in a satanic sex orgy - and that is the prosecutor's theory of the crime - she has lead a pretty normal, wholesome life.

#11

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Posted May 8, 2013 @ 10:39 PM

Novhappy, what evidence do you have to prove that she was in a drug and sex fueled situation that went wrong?

 

 

I'd like to know if they take a urine, blood or hair sample from Amanda with in 30 days of the crime? The Italian prosecution seemed wreckless.

 

I don't think Amanda is telling the truth about her drug use or what she knows about the crime. There was something in the Cuomo interview about she won't smoke pot anymore. I'm wondering if it was something that simple-too much alcohol and pot. Again if she lead a fairly clean and straight life it wouldnt' take much to make her fuzzy. 



#12

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Posted May 9, 2013 @ 9:09 AM

I absolutely believe Amanda had nothing to do with this murder.

 

For one reason, the prosecutor's incessant need to pin this on some kind of satanic drug induced orgy bullshit.  In my experience, when the authorities have nothing linking a person to a crime they then come up with these wild stories to explain all the unexplainables in their theory.  Much like the West Memphis 3.  Pin some weird notion on the suspect and suddenly all those unexplainables are plausible because...well, she's a satanist and they do weird shit.

 

Really?  How many people in jail are actual satanists who killed someone while participating in a satanic ritual?  Just another scare tactic to detract from the facts and gain a guilty verdict so they can check that box off on their career goals.

 

She turned off her cell phone, big deal.  How many innocent ways could that be explained?  Battery died, didn't want to be bothered, studying, watching a TV show, at a movie and as someone else said, ON A DATE....blah blah blah.  It took her a minute to call the police, so what?  She just found a dead body in her house, it wouldn't take you a minute?  Sadly, I can relate to this as I'm the one who found my mother's dead body and I can most definitely report back that it took me quite a few minutes to realize I needed to call 911.  And I wasn't a college student in another country when it happened.

 

Amanda had nothing to do with it and knows nothing.  Italy is reaching and as far as I'm concerned they need to leave this poor girl alone.  While I understand Meredith's family believing she did it (because hey, the cops said so right?) they need to point their anger elsewhere.  Like the cops and Italian government who have tried to pin this crap on an innocent girl and point the spotlight in Amanda's direction rather then the fact that Meredith is dead.  Which is what people SHOULD be remembering about this whole thing.



#13

novhappy

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Posted May 9, 2013 @ 10:22 AM

Novhappy, what evidence do you have to prove that she was in a drug and sex fueled situation that went wrong?          

 

 

I am sorry- I did not express that the way that I meant. I did not mean to imply that thre was some drug-fueled orgy- there is no evidence of that.  I meant the general situation- there was a lot of dating, drinking and pot smoking going on with the girls and the club etc...This does not mean either girl deserved what happened to her but covering up all of that behaviour may have led to the belief that there was more being covered up. I actually believe the drifter did it but the extremely immature response did not help her.  And she still sounds very childish and spoiled to me in the interview.



#14

beavertoof

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Posted May 9, 2013 @ 11:09 AM

I actually believe the drifter did it but the extremely immature response did not help her. 

 

Agree, even though I do not think her actions were as extreme in the aftermath as many people have been led to believe. This goes back to my point about what a bad job she does of communicating. She seems to be the type of person that has some trouble relating to the world around her, and so comes off in a weird quirky way.

 

There seems to be a scary tendency with groups of people to really relish jumping onto a "Burn the Witch!" bandwagon. This is nothing new in society (Salem Witch Trials is one example), and unfortunately for Amanda, she fell right into the role. 

 

I may be wrong, but I do not think the clamor for blood from her boyfriend at the time is nearly at the level as it is for hers.



#15

melissa1925

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Posted May 10, 2013 @ 8:54 AM

Did Diane Sawyer or Chris  Cuomo  say if the US would ever  even consider sending Amanda back to Italy they decide to recharge her?



#16

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Posted May 10, 2013 @ 1:01 PM

I, too, agree that the drifter did it and Amanda and her boyfriend just walked into the aftermath of the crime, but wow, she just comes across as very odd and uncomfortable in almost every social situation. If ever anyone needed some kind of PR rep or personal advisor on how to handle herself during all of this, it was Amanda.



#17

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Posted May 10, 2013 @ 11:56 PM

Well, I still consider this case unexplained.  That doesn't mean I think Amanda Knox is guilty, but I do feel like she was either involved in some way or there is more to this than she is telling.  Some of the strange things I've come across (like her and her boyfriend turning off their cell phones or the delay in calling the police) lead me to believe that. And, while obviously not evidence of murder, I find something unsettling about Amanda Knox and am missing the whole "naive, wholesome girl next door" image that the American media is pushing.

 

I'm with you, meandthemoon.  When I watched her interview, I said to those watching with me, "Look at her eyes.  She gives me the creeps."  If she's not responsible, I believe she's almost certainly involved in some way and neither she nor her boyfriend are talking.  No proof, just my opinion.  But I don't get the girl-next-door persona either.

 

But ~~ I'm editing this to add ~~ I most wholeheartedly believe she should not be re-tried for this crime.  Doesn't double-jeopardy mean anything in Italy? 


Edited by slasherboy, May 11, 2013 @ 12:04 AM.


#18

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Posted May 11, 2013 @ 1:16 PM

Did Diane Sawyer or Chris Cuomo say if the US would ever even consider sending Amanda back to Italy they decide to recharge her?

 

 

i was hoping to catch this interview but missed it so I want to thank my fellow TWOPpers for this thread.  To answer your question the government has already said they wouldn't extradiate Amanda Knox back to Italy.  While our two countries do have an extradition agreement there are exceptions for things like double jeopardy which this clearly is.


Edited by bulldawgtownie, May 12, 2013 @ 11:45 AM.


#19

Nell Huxleigh

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Posted May 11, 2013 @ 7:51 PM

Many countries don't have double jeopardy the same way we do. In Italy there are automatically two different higher courts that hear every conviction. Those two courts have to agree. Once the highest court finalizes the acquittal, then double jeopardy would apply. Italy's appellate courts hear matters of fact, not just law.

Unless they are magicians, there is no way they could be even involved. If anything, the men who lived downstairs who had "hung out" with Rudy Guede may have tipped him off when the girls were out. There just isn't a way for them to have been there during this violent crime and not left evidence.

Edited by Nell Huxleigh, May 11, 2013 @ 7:51 PM.


#20

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Posted May 12, 2013 @ 10:33 AM

While I can understand the sentiment about Amanda seeming awkward and even a little "weird", for me that's a big leap from that to murdering someone in the brutal fashion that Meredith was. I have followed the case for years and as titillating a story as the Italian judicial system seem determined to tell (American girl in wild, drug-fueled sexcapade with nerdy looking boyfriend ends in brutal murder of British girl) the evidence has never matched up. 

 

As many others have pointed out, the only DNA found in the room was that of Guede, money and credit cards were missing which matches with his history of robbing people, there were reports of someone trying to use Meredith's card that same night, matching with his running off and trying to get away using her card. No one, not a single person can legitimately put Amanda or her boyfriend at the apartment that night. And that's not even including all the horrible fuck-ups the Italian police did, like not allowing Meredith's body to be checked for temperature so they could better predict how long she'd been dead. 



#21

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Posted May 12, 2013 @ 1:30 PM

Then there's the Italian prosecutor, a delusional nutjob who stubbornly clings to the belief that our world is rife with satanic cults performing human sacrifice and all sorts of hellish abuse ...



#22

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Posted May 14, 2013 @ 9:08 AM

I kept seeing headline like "Will Amanda be sent back to Italy?"    "Is the nightmare over for Amanda"  

 

 

I read online USA Today that "Amanda Knox looks forward to returning to Italy as a tourist and not a defendant"

 

 

That doesn't make any sense. I hope that Diane Sawyer asked her about that?

 

I'm so confused.



#23

emanze

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Posted May 14, 2013 @ 3:35 PM

Amanda Knox looks forward to returning to Italy as a tourist

 

Really? I love Italy, but if I were Amanda it'd be a cold day in hell.......



#24

toogoodtobetrue

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Posted May 14, 2013 @ 5:35 PM

The US has not said definitively that it will not send Amanda back. Technically it is not double jeopardy.

#25

beavertoof

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Posted May 15, 2013 @ 8:30 AM

...Then there's the Italian prosecutor, a delusional nutjob...

 

this big time! If anyone needs to be in the slammer, its this dude.


Edited by beavertoof, May 15, 2013 @ 8:31 AM.


#26

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Posted May 16, 2013 @ 1:13 PM

While I can understand the sentiment about Amanda seeming awkward and even a little "weird", for me that's a big leap from that to murdering someone in the brutal fashion that Meredith was. 

 

 

 

Preach. It also stands to reason that a not-particularly-affluent Seattle teenager, who's never been shown to have violent tendencies, works to save as much money as she can so she can study abroad. Then, upon her arrival in Italy, she somehow finds a couple of likeminded people who don't mind murdering a stranger*, and ultimately brutally slays a woman she met only six weeks earlier. 

 

* Though I guess that part has happened... e.g. the "Bully" story.



#27

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Posted May 16, 2013 @ 3:00 PM

And I find it surprising so many scoffed over the idea of her confessing that first night due to confusion and being under duress. When as the Diane Sawyer special noted, how many murder cases have been thrown out in the U.S. because the judge deemed a confession inadmissible because of the way it was obtained? And that's when the individual was in a country where they spoke the language. Imagine being in a country where you don't speak the language, you're alone and scared out of your mind.

 

My cousin was held at Heathrow airport for no other reason than the airport people deemed that she was trying to sneak into country and overstay. After hours of being stuck in a small room, harassed, questioned and just basically terrified, she was told to sign a blank piece of paper before being let go and that it would be filled in later. Guess what, she signed it.

 

And from the safety of our homes, I bet everyone would say, "who in the right mind would sign a paper with no idea what was going to be put on it later". But when you're in another country, alone, no family and friends around, scared, there's a lot of unwise things you might do. Especially if you're led to believe that doing it means you'll get to go home or be okay.



#28

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Posted May 18, 2013 @ 6:19 AM

Some of the strange things I've come across (like her and her boyfriend turning off their cell phones or the delay in calling the police) lead me to believe that.

 

Just one note that in Raefelle's book, he mentioned that he and Amanda thought there may have been a break-in and didn't know exactly what to do, so he called his sister who was in the carabinieri, the Italian military police.  She told them to leave and call the local carabinieri, which they did. (And got lost on the way) Had they gotten there first though, the case and evidence may have handled more properly.

 

Instead, the postal police having tracked down Meredith's cell phones (from some random woman's yard who called the police when she found them) got there first and the case was in the hands of the local Perugia city police who had far less experience in investigating criminal investigations than the carabinieri.



#29

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Posted May 20, 2013 @ 12:43 PM

I've actually watched some things lately about false confessions and one of the experts said that part of what happens is the person (especially young people) becomes entirely focused on the getting out of there (the interregation room) and ends up doing whatever they think will make that happen.

 

I found the Chris Coumo interview very annoying, especially his attempt to slut shame her but she did say that she's much better at communicating in writing than speaking. I think that could be at least part of the reason she comes across "weird".



#30

beavertoof

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Posted May 21, 2013 @ 8:57 AM

I found the Chris Coumo interview very annoying, especially his attempt to slut shame her but she did say that she's much better at communicating in writing than speaking.

 

Agree. It was a very strange television interviewing style to say the least. At times it seemed he was trying to help her in some manner, by getting past the bull and exposing the simple facts of the case, at other times it seemed he was almost enjoying making her cringe and weep, kind of like what they enjoyed doing to her in Italy.

 

I think I will likely get her book, or at least a sample of it from kindle. It will be interesting to see if she does in fact communicate better via writing. I know I do.