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2-17: "Welcome to Storybrooke" 2013.03.17


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#271

PaperScissors

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Posted Mar 22, 2013 @ 7:27 PM

Great recap Cindy! One detail though, Greg got Regina's phone number because he surreptitiously took a photo of the name tag on Henry's backpack... So not totally random. Love the rest though :)
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#272

Schmacky0

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Posted Mar 22, 2013 @ 8:36 PM

That is a really good catch about Greg taking a picture of Henry's backpack. I didn't notice that at all. Very sneaky that Greg is :P
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#273

stealinghome

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Posted Mar 24, 2013 @ 9:05 PM

I'm so happy to see Graham that I want to ignore the icky rape implications that overwhelm their "relationship." No dice. I recall reading a discussion in which a viewer said Horowitz and/or Kitsis disagree that Regina has been raping Graham for all these years. I have no idea if either of them actually said that because most of the time, I avoid show-based media. I don't like off-screen explanations tainting my perception of what I see on-screen. Moments like this are exactly why. I don't care what a creator or writer says off-screen, if the on-screen story flies in its face.

When a magical Evil Queen rips out people's hearts and then uses those hearts to control their actions, and exerts said control to get a handsome huntsman/Sheriff into her bed, she has slipped him a Roofie. You can call it whatever you want, Creatives, but that doesn't make it not rape. With his heart in her hands (or at least, her vault) Graham is incapable of consent. She is forcing him to copulate. Rape is a horrible crime. That said, if there's a continuum of iniquity, murder is the ultimate because the victim can never heal. Since, in a fit of pique, Regina ultimately murders Graham, saying (and really, pretending, yes) Regina isn't is rapist does nothing to make her actions toward him any more palatable. She takes away his agency and then his life. She is horrible and wicked. She is Evil Incarnate. Sure, I feel for her. Sometimes, I even root for her redemption (but not for a long time, please), but Evil she is, and I won't pretend otherwise -- to do so would be to engage in that "legitimate rape" bullshit.

Slow clap, Cindy, slow clap.
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#274

SomeMeddlingKid

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Posted Mar 25, 2013 @ 9:10 AM

Seconded, that was 100% on point.
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#275

Cindy McLennan

Cindy McLennan

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Posted Mar 25, 2013 @ 10:00 AM

Thanks!

Deadline ate some of your recap around page 13, as you note Henry asking Regina not to curse him, and then later mention Gold telling Snow that Regina decided to destroy the curse. However you don't mention Regina waving the curse around as she talks to Emma and her family nor do you mention her burning said curse up after Henry's desperate pleas. Just slightly unclear around there.


I don't know how I missed mentioning that. I suspect I mistakenly deleted it when proofing. Sometimes, I cause more problems by proofing than were originally present in the first draft. I'm sorry.

#276

Korilian

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Posted Apr 1, 2013 @ 2:16 PM

I liked the touch we got of Rumple's regret...


Hahahahaha! I'm sorry, but Rumple's regret is just as contrived as Regina's crocodile tears. He's probably plotting how he can take out Henry as we speak. And convincing himself that he's justified.

...it's his running off into the woods when he knows Regina's looking to cast a spell on him. How does he think he's going to defend himself against that?


Honestly I don't think Henry has a plan. He's just doing what he's always done. When he has a conflict or feels threatened by the adults in his life his reaction has always been to run (running to Emma, skipping school, sneaking around, heading for the mine...). He couldn't trust Regina so he resorted to sorting things out himself. He's not going to unlearn that behavior that easily.

Edited by Korilian, Apr 1, 2013 @ 2:26 PM.

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#277

MorninStar

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Posted Apr 1, 2013 @ 2:55 PM

...it's his running off into the woods when he knows Regina's looking to cast a spell on him. How does he think he's going to defend himself against that?



Honestly I don't think Henry has a plan. He's just doing what he's always done. When he has a conflict or feels threatened by the adults in his life his reaction has always been to run (running to Emma, skipping school, sneaking around, heading for the mine...). He couldn't trust Regina so he resorted to sorting things out himself. He's not going to unlearn that behavior that easily.

The more I think about Henry the more surprised I am that he's not a basket case. Of course he tends to run. Throughout his life very few problems would be resolved or even addressed if everyone lived the same day over & over! He has lived most of his life in a town where almost everyone lived a ground-hog-day-like existence. The school day would have had the same material being taught day after day. The same responses from teachers and fellow students every day. Why not skip school? He probably only learned a few new lessons each year when he moved up a grade (while his fellow students stayed unchanging, un-ageing, in the same class, I presume.) The only one who changed was his mother, Regina, and she lied to him and told him he was crazy and sent him to a shrink (whose sessions were probably also very similar.) It's no surprise that Henry would have become proficient on the computer.. looking for a way out; it gave him new information. He figured out that the world around him was very different from the life he was leading in Storybrooke. What else would he think but that magic was the problem and by getting rid of it (now that the curse was broken) would solve everything.

What I don't think Henry realizes, especially in the case of his mother, magic is not the problem, although it does make the problem worse/gives Regina an advantage. Regina's warped world view, selfishness, and her desire for vengeance and control is the real problem.
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#278

Scribbly

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Posted Jun 22, 2013 @ 7:41 AM

I've been watching over the summer but only felt the need to come post after watching this episode.  Basically, I agree with everything StopItNow said.  This episode showed what a monster Regina is and the self-righteous crap in this episode drove me nuts.  The big mistake Snow made wasn't killing Cora, it was failing to kill Regina or at least lock her up.  If you have a serial killer in your town, you don't just let her go and if you're not willing or able to lock her up, you have to do something to stop her.  It's basically criminal negligence to let this woman wander around free.

 

I hated that they brought Snow to new pathetic heights in this episode because she finally did the right thing and chose to protect others over her personal sense of what's right.  They were at war before, I'm sure she understood the whole "You have to stop the people who are trying to kill you" bit of it.

 

Also, Neal needs to have a serious talk with his son about magic and parents.  Heck, the Blue Fairy and Emma could explain to him the whole "Magic doesn't actually MAKE you evil."  Otherwise Henry should have teamed up with pre-memory-loss Belle and formed some club for people with serious denial issues.


Edited by Scribbly, Jun 22, 2013 @ 7:45 AM.

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#279

John Potts

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Posted Aug 9, 2013 @ 5:28 PM

It was nice to get some answers as to how Storybrooke "worked" under the Curse. I guess it didn't matter that Storybrooke is invisible to the rest of the world because presumably the supplies would ceaselessly restock at the start of each loop (though since people could access the internet under the Curse, you'd wonder how they didn't notice the passage of time for the outside world). And while we only saw three iterations of the Loop, I assume there were more that we didn't see before Regina got bored with nothing changing. And I guess if Regina wants Snow to suffer (however unfairly she holds that view) then she had no choice but to put her heart back in - without a heart, you can't feel anything (according to Graham) so she wouldn't agonise over her position

 

I do buy Snow's depression after killing (or at least, aiding in the death of) Cora. Not because I believe she was necessarily wrong in what she did, but because for most people, killing somebody is a big deal (hell, part of a soldier's basic training is about breaking that instinct). I love KAOSAgent's  idea that it might be a form of Curse delayed post partum depression, though I'm pretty sure that's not what TPTB intended. After all, following the internal logic of the episode, if any killing is wrong, then they're already doomed thanks to the conquest of Regina and King George's Kingdoms. They obviously didn't use purely non-lethal means, because at one point Grumpy commented that Red had "somebody" on her mouth. Though none of those soldiers had lines so I guess they didn't count, though that's in many ways an even more disturbing lesson ("Don't worry about genocide in Darfur because they're not anyone you've ever spoken to" - which oddly enough is pretty close to what Regina believes).

 

I guess Greg/Owen naturally leapt to the "Magical" explanation of Gold's fireball because of how he lost his father. 28 years is quite a long time to hold onto a belief everyone presumably told him was crazy (ascribing it to trauma of losing his parents, I guess) although it seems less unreasonable than many things the show has stated. While I agree with xqueenfrostine that while to the rest of the world Rumple's fireball would be "Cool effect! I wonder how he did it?" it show why he would leap to the magical explanation. Though on the subject of Greg/Owen:

 

 

SueB  Graham tried to arrest Owen's dad for drunk driving while NOT driving NOR drunk. Control seemed pretty absolute.

 

 

I really had a problem with that scene, too. Graham had previously been shown to have some free will, so I didn't understand why she used a blatant lie to get him to arrest Owen's dad. Wouldn't she have been better saying that he'd abducted the kid? Sure, it's still a lie, but even an uncontrolled Graham would have to act (as did Emma with Hansel & Gretel) in his role as Sheriff.

 

 

Slithy Toves I’m really not happy with Rumple’s ability to see the future, no matter how hazy. It’s like some sort of temporal Schrodinger’s Cat - as soon as you look, the outcome is set.

 

 

To quote Excalibur “Looking at the cake is a bit like looking at the future – until you’ve tasted it what do you really know? But then of course, it’s too late!” Being able to see the future doesn't mean you understand all the whys and wherefores, as any Prophecy from Greek myth could show you.


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#280

PollyTheist

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Posted Aug 12, 2013 @ 10:59 AM

John Potts - I agree with your post for the most part but am just dazzled by you quoting Excalibur.  :)


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