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Amour


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#1

TWoP Gadget

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Posted Feb 2, 2013 @ 7:50 PM

Octogenarians Georges and Anne are retired music teachers whose daughter lives abroad with her family. When Anne suffers a stroke and is left paralyzed on one side of her body, the couple’s abiding love for each other is put to the test.



#2

ethanvahlere

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 12:49 AM

I am not a Michael Haneke fan by any means - I won't deny he's technically brilliant, but I find him a scold - yet I really liked this movie. He cuts away from any sentimentality creeping into this movie, and instead gives you scenes that are genuinely and emotionally moving. The scene where Isabelle Huppert is trying to speak to Emmanuelle Riva when Riva is recovering from a stroke is a good example; the filmmaking is restrained, with a single long shot of Huppert sitting at her mother's bedside and trying to listen, and therefore it lets you draw your own conclusions. The ending - which I don't want to talk about until more people have seen it - is another example. Of course, it also helps Riva and Jean-Louis Trintignant are not only both drawing on our memories of their past work, but are terrific here as well.

#3

braggtastic

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 11:08 AM

It was a tough film to watch at times, but the performances were very strong.

#4

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 3:53 PM

Agreed, it's a hard movie to watch because you know there's no happy ending in the conventional sense. I think I started sniffling about 30 minutes before the end. By the end I was flat out bawling.

Edited by Puds38, Feb 3, 2013 @ 4:28 PM.


#5

davidmello

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 4:03 PM

I'm with braggtastic on this one. I'd been hearing about this movie for months and wondered if it would ever get to Sacramento. It did, and it will get Best Foreign Language film in three weeks. This is a movie that will break your heart, even if you know that it will.

#6

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 7:28 PM

it will get Best Foreign Language film in three weeks


After seeing it today, I sincerely believe it will get more than that.

So, so moving. The strange thing is, while watching it, I was thinking not only about how sad her decline was, but how wonderful their love was-it makes you really want to have that kind of love in your life. I read a review that said most Hollywood movies only depict falling in love and the early stages and this movie depicts the lived-in aspects of love and what love is at the end of life and that makes it so unusual.

I loved how even at the end, he could calm her down by just holding her hand.

I noticed that there were a lot of scenes where the camera would just lie still and I found that strangely tense-probably because I am used to quick cuts and jumpy handheld stuff regularly.

It's a great movie-I don't know if I could handle seeing it again, but I am so glad that I did.

ETA: And the ending?...I thought it was indicating that he was following her into death willingly. It seemed like he had not eaten since she had died.

Edited by ghetto hood rat, Feb 3, 2013 @ 7:30 PM.


#7

Redtracer

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 11:49 PM

A sad but wonderful movie, as everyone else has said. The two leads are the best male and female performances I saw in any movie last year, and what I like most about Haneke's direction here is that while he doesn't pull any punches in showing Riva's decline, it didn't feel like he was rubbing our noses in it, which was my biggest fear going into the movie. This is absolutely not misery porn; it's a sensitive depiction of some very tough subject matter.

I noticed that there were a lot of scenes where the camera would just lie still and I found that strangely tense-probably because I am used to quick cuts and jumpy handheld stuff regularly.


Me too. My stomach was in knots at a few points, even though we were just watching Trintignant move around the apartment. You don't expect to feel that kind of tension in a minimalist drama that takes place almost entirely within the apartment of two elderly people.

My main question: what's up with the pigeon? I have no doubt that I'm just being thick, but I feel like it's supposed to symbolize something, and I can't quite put my finger on it. Is it just life in general? Some sort of spiritual metaphor? A contrast between how Trintignant humanely captures and releases the pigeon and Riva's final scene? Or just a semi-humorous interlude in a movie that really needs one?

Edited by Redtracer, Feb 3, 2013 @ 11:51 PM.


#8

ethanvahlere

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Posted Feb 4, 2013 @ 9:42 AM

I would vote with contrast. It's perhaps the one part of the movie I would have cut out, but it is a relatively light moment, and perhaps the movie needed that.

#9

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Posted Feb 5, 2013 @ 5:53 AM

The movie brought back memories of my grandmother taking care of my grandfather in his last years. All the details of trying to carry someone to and from the bathroom, searching for good nurses, feeding, cleaning...painful stuff. It was very well done, and I stated in the Oscar Snubs thread that I thought both leads deserved Oscar nods, but I don't blame anyone who has been a caretaker for the aged for preferring to skip this.

As for the pigeon--I was bewildered also by what it symbolized, and brought up the question to my movie discussion group. They decided that it was an actual pigeon, and Georges wanted to shoo it out because he didn't want to kill it when he turned on the gas to kill himself. I completely missed the latter and was unsure while watching the movie about what had happened to Georges. I thought he might have died, but I also wondered if he was in jail for his mercy killing.

The movie group never did come up with an answer about the scene at the end where Georges wakes to the sound of Anne washing dishes. Was it a hallucination where they both depart for the afterlife? Or had we looped back to the beginning and this was the "actual" Georges and Anne about to leave for the concert we saw them attend in one of the first scenes? Thoughts?

#10

ethanvahlere

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Posted Feb 5, 2013 @ 10:29 AM

You make a good point about the pigeon. As for the last scene between the two of them, I would argue it's the afterlife (assuming you believe in one).

#11

chailey

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Posted Feb 18, 2013 @ 9:18 AM

I think that it's meant to be the afterlife, or them going on to the next stage when they exit the apartment. I think that his amazement on seeing her points to that.

As far as the pigeon goes, it is an old superstition that having a bird fly into your house is a death omen. I'm not sure if that was what Haneke was going for here or not. I thought that Georges was going to kill the second pigeon and was relieved when he did not.

I know that Riva is understandably getting all of the kudos for this film, but I thought that Trintignant did an amazing job as well.

My 88 year old mother had a near-death health crisis last year and this movie really struck home. Some scenes felt very familiar to me. (Fortunately, unlike Anne, she recovered.)

#12

GreekGeek

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Posted Feb 18, 2013 @ 9:49 AM

My only problem with the "they depart for the afterlife" interpretation is that it seems a bit pie-in-the-sky for a movie that avoided anything so overtly religious for two hours. Of course, you can argue that it's all in Georges' head and that he and Anne aren't going anywhere except the cemetery.

Edited by GreekGeek, Feb 18, 2013 @ 9:49 AM.