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5-9: "Black Blotter" 2012.12.14


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#121

NorthTexas

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Posted Dec 18, 2012 @ 6:11 PM

I know I sound like a broken record :) but, it has been stated repeatedly, that no one writer pens a Fringe episode. In fact, the writer of Black Blotter tweeted that the writing of the episode "was a team effort".

"The writers" in this case was "the writer" who had never written a Fringe screenplay before. Yes, most of the dialogue in this episode was clunky.

It happens.

The regular writing staff will take it from here.


I will go to my grave ;0) saying that I think Joel Wyman is behind some of the really poor and clunky POlivia dialogue as particular turn of phrase are repeated ad nauseum, irrespective of whose name is on the script.

I love Joel, he's great to the fans. So, apologies for dogging on him harshly.

Edited by NorthTexas, Dec 18, 2012 @ 6:43 PM.

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#122

Jodhaa

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Posted Dec 18, 2012 @ 6:30 PM

I will go to my grave ;0) saying that I think Joel Wyman is behind some of the really poor and clunky POlivia dialogue as particular turn of phrase is repeated ad nauseum


Yeah, there's been a joke on twitter that one of the Fringe writers loves the word "incredible" because its used a couple of times an episode and sure enough Peter uses it in that scene.
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#123

oconnellaboo

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Posted Dec 18, 2012 @ 9:02 PM

I know I sound like a broken record :) but, it has been stated repeatedly, that no one writer pens a Fringe episode. In fact, the writer of Black Blotter tweeted that the writing of the episode "was a team effort".

I saw that tweet as well. When you're dealing with a series as steeped in mythology as Fringe, no writer writes in a vacuum. TPTB are going to have final say on anything having to do with the overall arc of the series, especially when you're in the home stretch to the finale. That scene was clunky and heavy-handed - particularly in its Peter-guilt. I loved the episode anyway, but wish it could have been a bit more sympathetic to Peter's grief.

Yeah, there's been a joke on twitter that one of the Fringe writers loves the word "incredible" because its used a couple of times an episode and sure enough Peter uses it in that scene.


Oh, Joel... SO busted... lol
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#124

Coco27

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Posted Dec 18, 2012 @ 10:14 PM

I didn't have a problem with the scene, other that maybe it wasn't in the best of setting. Having this conversation while walking into the woods seems to lessen its importance a bit, i much prefer when they have these heart-to-hearts while driving, its more intimate. Or it could have been part of the first scene, since it was more quiet and fitting for this kind of apology. 
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#125

MrHainsworth

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Posted Dec 19, 2012 @ 3:59 AM

Lately, I feel like we could have played a Fringe drinking game; down a shot every time Walter talks about hubris!
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#126

jipijapa

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Posted Dec 19, 2012 @ 11:40 AM

This episode provides a good example (for me) of a character development that I don't personally like, but which isn't necessarily something that the writers have just tacked on. I'm not a huge fan of the "Good Walter vs. Evil Walter internal struggle" direction... but I have to be honest and say that my reaction stems from years' worth of imagining Walter's past differently, even after we had already been given "evidence" in the narrative that Walter was not a nice guy in the past.

I preferred to imagine Walter as being a more moderate sort of character who was always under William Bell's thumb and influence, without a dark side of his own. But even as far back as "Grey Matters" the writers told us and showed us (through John Noble's performance) that Walter used to be a hard man. Even though I kind of don't like the intrusion of "Evil Walter" on the proceedings this late in the game, I can't say that the writers are just pulling this out of their asses. And also, it makes the bizarre hardness and bitterness of Season 3 Walternate easier to comprehend, when at the time it just seemed random and inexplicable.
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#127

Jodhaa

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Posted Dec 19, 2012 @ 12:22 PM

That scene was clunky and heavy-handed - particularly in its Peter-guilt. I loved the episode anyway, but wish it could have been a bit more sympathetic to Peter's grief.


I actually thought Olivia would be more upset with Peter. I wish the writers would give us more conversations between them because Peter straight out lied to her numerous times. I think that's what bothered me the most about the entire thing and I would love to see a scene between them discussing it.
It's a shame that all we get is that one scene.

Edited by Jodhaa, Dec 19, 2012 @ 12:47 PM.

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#128

Tippi Blevins

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Posted Dec 19, 2012 @ 4:37 PM

Full recap is up now.

#129

Ulkis

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Posted Dec 20, 2012 @ 8:58 AM

Thanks for filling in Tippi! Great recap; "bowling with the angels now" made me chuckle.
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#130

shapeshifter

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Posted Dec 20, 2012 @ 4:12 PM

Thanks for filling in Tippi! Great recap; "bowling with the angels now" made me chuckle.

I loved that line too, but in a more wistful way, as I also felt when we caught a glimpse of Sam's drivers license photo.The acknowledgement of the loss of that character is sort of representative of the feelings about the end of the show.

Edited by shapeshifter, Dec 20, 2012 @ 4:14 PM.

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#131

AngelKitty

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Posted Dec 20, 2012 @ 4:58 PM

I loved that line too, but in a more wistful way, as I also felt when we caught a glimpse of Sam's drivers license photo.The acknowledgement of the loss of that character is sort of representative of the feelings about the end of the show.

Yes, shapeshifter, I feel the same. I was hoping we would see Sam again and to find out if he was the same sort of mystical advisor character that we knew. It always seemed he knew more than he was telling and I just wonder what sorts of things he might have known in this timeline. But it's nice they gave us closure.

As for Walter's acid trip, does anyone know if it's really possible to see things like that? Because I tried LSD a few years ago and it was nothing like that. I never saw anything that wasn't already there but real things I looked at moved. At the time my living room had sparkle popcorn ceilings and when I looked up at it the sparkles started twirling into tiny galaxys and all of a sudden I knew how Frank Herbert came up with the idea of seeing folded space through the use of spice.

I would like to thank Tippi for the recap. Great job and you helped clarify a few things for me.

Edited by AngelKitty, Dec 20, 2012 @ 4:59 PM.

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#132

sleepingwalker

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Posted Dec 20, 2012 @ 5:52 PM

Regarding Sam Weiss in the S5/S4 timeline: In this timeline Peter dies as a child. However the machine was created, sent back in time, and assembled. I've always assumed that the Sam Weiss character was essentially part of the creation of the machine. So I would think that he knew all kinds of stuff that was passed down to him over the generations even if the endgame at the activation of the machine played out differently in the S5/S4 timeline.
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#133

shapeshifter

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Posted Dec 20, 2012 @ 7:39 PM

As for Walter's acid trip, does anyone know if it's really possible to see things like that? Because I tried LSD a few years ago and it was nothing like that. I never saw anything that wasn't already there but real things I looked at moved.

Good point. I haven't ingested any since the 70s and thought maybe later versions were stronger, but according to the Wikipedia article, later versions had a lower dosage, and the effects are like what you described and I recall.
I do recall painting brightly colored pictures with fantastical images, so perhaps what we are seeing in this episode is more of Walter letting his imagination run free under the influence of LSD. Plus, he may have taken other drugs concurrently.
I think there are a lot of urban legends about the effects of LSD and LSD-induced hallucinations, perhaps in part based on LDS-inspired art, so maybe the writers were just riffing off of those.
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#134

DixieGirl

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Posted Dec 20, 2012 @ 11:27 PM

I wish we could've seen more of Sam's wallet... I'm curious to see if he still had his museum membership card...
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#135

shapeshifter

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Posted Dec 20, 2012 @ 11:43 PM

I wish we could've seen more of Sam's wallet... I'm curious to see if he still had his museum membership card...

DixieGirl, you're almost making me cry.
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#136

DixieGirl

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Posted Dec 21, 2012 @ 12:29 AM

DixieGirl, you're almost making me cry.


Aww, don't, you'll get me started again.
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#137

MrHainsworth

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Posted Dec 21, 2012 @ 8:09 PM

I don't remember Sam Weiss. Was he the curly-haired bowling alley owner?
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#138

madam magpie

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Posted Dec 21, 2012 @ 8:44 PM

I don't remember Sam Weiss. Was he the curly-haired bowling alley owner?

Yes.
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#139

MrHainsworth

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Posted Dec 21, 2012 @ 8:49 PM

Oh, that explains the recapper's remark about Sam bowling with the angels.
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#140

AngelKitty

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Posted Dec 21, 2012 @ 11:37 PM

Walter letting his imagination run free under the influence of LSD. Plus, he may have taken other drugs concurrently.

Tee hee. He does like his drug cocktails.
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#141

FakeLocke

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Posted Dec 22, 2012 @ 2:17 PM

Considering Sam Weiss was such an important part of the first three seasons (and the e-comic), his death was poorly handled. Without him, the Machine doesn't get built, Olivia is still an emotional car wreck over John Scott, and much of the mythology around the "first people" is essentially pissed away.

He has become the "Jacob" of Fringe.
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#142

Jodhaa

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Posted Dec 22, 2012 @ 2:35 PM

Weiss came on in the 2nd season not the first and he helped Olivia deal with losing Charlie, crossing over, etc.
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#143

DixieGirl

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Posted Dec 22, 2012 @ 2:48 PM

Yeah, Sam didn't have anything to do with John Scott.
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#144

lizw65

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Posted Dec 22, 2012 @ 6:32 PM

I'm not sure he had anything to do with building the Machine, either; he and his family just documented its presence and helped build up the mythology of the First People.
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#145

rerunz

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Posted Dec 22, 2012 @ 11:30 PM

The flashbacks were there to tell us something. And to allow Elizabeth to appear in all five seasons of course. Two things stood out to me. First, Walter telling Elizabeth she would be fine, he wasn't going to let anything happen to her. Oops. Second was hearing Carla tell him before he went that both universes would fail. But he went for Peter anyway.
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#146

Taryn74

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Posted Sep 18, 2013 @ 5:34 PM

Okay reading thru the thread, it looks like viewers were kinda split on this episode.  I thought it was incredible.  Seeing Carla pop up in Walter's lab made me gasp out loud.  I thought at first she was just going to be a visual reminder to him, kind of a "You may want to pretend otherwise, but I know what kind of man you really are..." haunting presence.  But then she started talking and I got a little confused, because Carla never was that angry and mean with Walter when we saw her in Peter.  (Of course she hadn't died in the lab yet then, either.  heh.)  She didn't hesitate to confront him, sure, but the things she was saying just sounded off.  But after a while I got it, she was only voicing what Walter really believes about himself.  And that made me very, very sad.

 

I don't know if the end scene struck anyone else this way or not, but I honestly believed that Walter was going to set the lab on fire trying to burn the book and thus "accidentally" die in the same way that Carla did.  I don't think I breathed from the time he lit the match until a scene from the next episode popped up on Netflix and I saw that he was still alive.  And then I started shaking.  (My reaction may be related to a real-life event, though.  A former friend's mother died after she accidentally set her curtains on fire trying to find the source of "voices" that were taunting her.  So that scene was very powerful, and painful, and frightening, to me.)  It also made me think of the scene in The Order when Mara is forced to commit suicide by demons from her past that she could no longer silence, so that didn't help my state of mind.

 

Sad to hear that Sam Weiss is dead, though he at least died a noble death.

 

I totally understand why they had to get a different actor to play The Child/Michael, but I really loved the kid from before.  He was able to emote with his eyes a lot better and you could really feel a tangible connection between him and Olivia.  This one just comes across as flat and dead.

 

I kinda had to laugh at posters griping about Olivia and Peter not sharing a bed (by pushing their cots together) in the lab since they've already reconciled.  Do we really expect them to just be humping like bunnies, with everything that's going on?  Especially in a place that offers no privacy whatsoever?

 

I don't remember, was it actually established why Donald had to move Michael out of the pocket universe early?  Or maybe it was that Walter didn't plan on being gone that long at all (in the real world, which would have amounted to a very short time to Michael in the pocket) and Donald had to go back for Michael after Walter was ambered.  That would make more sense I guess, since Walter only left Michael with one little packet of M&Ms.  I remember yelling at the TV at the time, Gee Walter, a packet of M&Ms isn't going to last him five days!  Heh.


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