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#1471

wlk68

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 5:42 PM

 I feel like we're watching two different Bryans! I think his food is more inventive and thoughtful than the other chefs'. He seems to listen to the judges' critiques and takes their comments into account when similar situations come up. Yeah, he's disappointed when he does not win, but he is a competitive person. I think he comes off as confident but not arrogant, and happy to be there. I like that he gives the other chefs insights from his past experience on TC, and genuinely enjoys their company

 

I have to confess I'm a tad biased but this is also the Bryan that I see. And it matches up with what I remember of him from his season of Top Chef: Original Flavor. He was serious about being there and very earnest about his food. He didn't get involved in any of the drama and he never said a bad word about any of the other cheftestants in his talking heads like certain others did. *cough*Mike Isabella*cough*  

 

And Lee Anne Wong had this to say about him in her TC behind the scenes blog:

 

Bryan Voltaggio, what else can I say? All the ladies on production loved Bryan (thump thump thump thump ... the sound of beating hearts) for many reasons, but primarily because he was always courteous, a gentleman, and really the easiest to work with of the entire cast.

 

Okay, I will get off my Pro-Bryan soapbox and put away my cheerleading pom-poms now. 


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#1472

anonymiss

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 5:54 PM

Bryan himself said no one was checking for him prior to Top Chef and that Volt was in danger of folding. I know he is admired now for things other than his chef skills (i.e., being "gentlemanly" and "easy on the eyes") but that's my point. 


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#1473

stillshimpy

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 6:05 PM

My take on it is that I believe Bryan has a trait that can seem cold, arrogant or falsely entitled in some: I think he's a little reserved and introverted, which seems an odd thing to say about a reality show participant but he doesn't have a showman's personality.  He's a little restrained and prone to not being very confrontational.  Not in passive-aggressive way, he just says what he thinks sort of quietly and then stops talking.  

 

I personally like that about him a lot.  He's just a tiny bit awkward, but in such a pleasant way and I think the kind of guys humor, "the most romantic thing I've done is punch Doug in the leg" is just not something he's super skilled at with anyone but his brother and even then I think of Michael as being the bigger personality, the person more prone to mixing it up and getting loud.  

 

A good example of what I'm talking about is that little snippet we saw when the group was sitting around talking about Bryan getting ready to renew his vows and how his third child was on the way.  The other guys are being playful in the best way, they aren't being mean, but they're being very "It's fun here in the locker room where we routinely dump coolers on each other's heads!  Time to scratch!"  very "nooooo, man don't do it! Why do that twice, isn't once bad enough? She's making you, isn't she?" and it's all with lots of laughter and no real derision, but Bryan actually just didn't get it or they were talking about something too important to him to joke around about, because with sort of a dwindling smile he said, "No, it's not like that." and just sort of picked at his beer label.   He wasn't really laughing it off, he wasn't wounded to the core, he just didn't seem to know how to handle the attempt at Dude Humor.  

 

Most of those guys are married, they were just busting on him, but it's not Bryan's first language and he doesn't seem to go easily between the friendly posturing of Sang and Doug, to being  good, emotionally supportive guy a la Doug really being super kind to Jen (when none of the other guys were there) when she said she was so glad it wasn't her up there (at Judge's table) and Doug said the perfect thing:  "No one begrudges you that reaction, Jen, we're all here to win."  Not dismissively, not with faux sincerity, just the right emotional tone so that you could tell she felt better just hearing it. 

 

Bryan can't step easily between his personas that way and only really seems to have one main one.  The other guys, all of their sides are equally sincere, they just easily slide from one persona to the next as appropriate for the moment.  

 

That's my take on it, that may not be the truth of the matter and it wouldn't change the fact that that inability to joke around, that almost too serious thing Bryan has might not appeal to everyone.  

 

I like him.  If he wins I certainly won't be upset.  Has he won at all here though?  I can name Jen's charity, Sang's and Doug's but I'm drawing a blank on Bryan's leading me to believe he's been runner up a bunch.  


Edited by stillshimpy, Sep 5, 2013 @ 6:12 PM.

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#1474

anonymiss

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 6:32 PM

Bryan is only now beginning to receive some acclaim after TC. He'd fit in on TC All-Stars but wouldn't be anywhere near the conversation for Masters if they weren't short of highly-acclaimed chefs willing to participate. So I find it off-putting when I see him griping about being critiqued at all or complaining his voice isn't respected enough in a team, as though he isn't the upstart amongst what is ostensibly a revered group. It's like how on The Next Iron Chef: All-Stars, Chef Spike deferred to his partner Marcus Samuelson out of reverence and humility in knowing he was the upstart amongst the group.


Edited by anonymiss, Sep 5, 2013 @ 6:41 PM.

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#1475

jmhm

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 6:38 PM

I wonder how much his little brother's win is weighing on him. He's the brother who went to culinary school, and his brother used to work for him. It's got to be tough to have the judges choose his brother as the more talented chef.

 

I sort of like him. I thought it was charming the way he handled being put into "jail" because of his sous chef. 


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#1476

Bastinado

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 6:52 PM

 

What's funny is that he is, by far, the more emotionally accessible of the two Voltaggio brothers.  He's practically cuddly compared to the Winning Volt.   He really seems, to my eye, to have loosened up a bit and is showing more of his human side (which yes, I get that is likely a startling concept for anyone not familiar with him). I particularly liked the admission that he likes and eats nachos, seeing as all the other chefs seemed to feel obligated to poo-poo them. 

 

This. I was there for the Voltaggios' TC run, and Bryan was definitely the Volt that I actually liked. I have no problems so far with the balance of class and confidence in his food that Bryan has shown. Particularly since he seems to be in the middle-lower tiers of this pack of Masters, and isn't really being a dick or throwing tantrums about it. I get the sense that he knows he's largely outclassed, but is just honored to be included (attention and publicity from being on the show notwithstanding). 

 

 

Yes, one can see that when looking at him from the side. LOL, the boy has gained a lot of weight since his last TC stint.

 

Snerk. I noticed this at the beginning of the season too. But to be fair, he's a chef and an ageing dad - a weight gain isn't exactly surprising. 


Edited by Bastinado, Sep 5, 2013 @ 6:53 PM.

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#1477

anonymiss

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 8:01 PM

 

I get the sense that he knows he's largely outclassed, but is just honored to be included (attention and publicity from being on the show notwithstanding).

This is exactly what I'm surprised to not see so I'm curious what he's said/done to give you that sense? When one of the chefs ribbed him by saying, "Hey! Are you here to host?" Bryan was dead serious and raised his voice in an irritated: "NO." Granted that was an insulting joke but also fair, given his stature relative to the others and, if he felt the way you describe, I'd think he'd make light of it instead of reacting like it was a personal affront to him as such an equally celebrated chef.


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#1478

Bastinado

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 9:52 PM

 

This is exactly what I'm surprised to not see so I'm curious what he's said/done to give you that sense? When one of the chefs ribbed him by saying, "Hey! Are you here to host?" Bryan was dead serious and raised his voice in an irritated: "NO." Granted that was an insulting joke but also fair, given his stature relative to the others and, if he felt the way you describe, I'd think he'd make light of it instead of reacting like it was a personal affront to him as such an equally celebrated chef.

 

I was referencing the dinner the chefs had in the middle of the last episode at the sushi(?) restaurant. IIRC Bryan even said something to the effect of being pleased and honored to be in the competition with the other Masters, even though he has more experience in the Top Chef competition than most of them - which of course is not at all the same thing as being a renowned chef the way that the others are. 

 

As mentioned, Bryan's demeanor isn't super inviting. What may have sounded "irritated" was probably just a tone that is flat and disaffected, which he kind of is. Maybe I'm not remembering his first TC run properly, but I don't think I've ever seen Bryan Voltaggio angry or upset. From what I can see now and what I remember, he largely has two modes: somber and ambiguously somber. 


Edited by Bastinado, Sep 5, 2013 @ 9:53 PM.

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#1479

Maddingcrowd

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 10:25 PM

Bryan always seemed somber in his original TC run, and still is I think. There is nothing wrong with that, but i find more relaxed, casual people easier to watch. I like both Volt brothers a lot, and I have no problem with Bryan being there, but Sang has caught my eye and I think he is an amazing chef.

 

i did think Bryan didn't make as much of an effort as creating a cohesive dish with Sang as he could have. He seemed to say "This is what I'm doing, and you should make something smokey or BBQ" and left it at that. Of course, Sang could have came up with something better; but his wins on this show and general reputation lead me to believe he could have done better with a more cooperative partner. 


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#1480

Bandolero

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Posted Sep 5, 2013 @ 11:14 PM

 i did think Bryan didn't make as much of an effort as creating a cohesive dish with Sang as he could have. He seemed to say "This is what I'm doing, and you should make something smokey or BBQ" and left it at that. Of course, Sang could have came up with something better; but his wins on this show and general reputation lead me to believe he could have done better with a more cooperative partner.

 

Why should Bryan be accorded any fault regarding Sang's dish? Sang's dish sucked because of Sang's efforts not Bryan's. Sang had an equal opportunity to create a more cohesive dish. They both made what they wanted.

 

It seems like Bryan has some serious skills... would love to eat his food. I was really disappointed that the judges didn't really discuss his dish, only the cohesiveness with Sang's. Sucks.

 

And I like him as well. He seems like a good guy. Loved seeing him with his kids. He does not have to be Mr. Big Personality. 

 

As far as him being arrogant... I think a lot of these chefs can come off as being arrogant at times. He does not have to bow down to anybody. He is here to compete like everybody else... and has the skills to back it up. 

 

The chefs seemed to be going a bit hard on each other in the talking heads... ouch.


Edited by Bandolero, Sep 5, 2013 @ 11:16 PM.

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#1481

Nell Huxleigh

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 1:57 AM

If you are on a team and part of your and your partner's score depends on how well the dishes play, it seems sort of selfish to just pick a dish you know and let your partner try to match it if he can, especially knowing there are far fewer dishes that can be made cold anyway and many fish don't work well cold. David Burke did the same thing, but he has been more of a team player other times. This seems like Bryan's MO in team challenges - ignore the team aspect and make a standard dish. And he ignored the kid aspect of the kid challenge. I think this is why he can't win a QF (but who cares, I guess the producers really want me to think about poor Bryan not winning QFs). Those challenges are more about cooking without a script on Top Chef Masters.

Combined with his cipher personality, I just sort of find him not entertaining - all of the other chefs this time are pretty fun to watch. And his food seems like how Tracy Flick would play the game. I don't feel like the ingredients are speaking to him, I feel like he's cooking from a plan.
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#1482

Kali12

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 2:59 AM

Shy people often seem arrogant when they have some good accomplishments or are particularly attractive. I think Bryan's just shy, or introverted/reserved. LeeAnne's comment to me is very telling--under the pressure of TC (inc. having his brother and a few high-amp people like Isabella and Blais around) , he was a pleasure to work with. That says a lot--plus, everything I've read and seen about him as a chef makes him seem the opposite of arrogant.

 

I don't think he'[ll win, I don't even know if I'd want him to win, because I think there are better chefs there, but if he does win, I'd be fine with it.


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#1483

JTMacc99

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 7:52 AM

I think that the fear Doug puts into the other chefs comes from the 2 Michelin stars he got. It's a big deal to them.

 

And I like how Doug looked inside of himself and realized that he's used to being THE man in the kitchen when figuring out how to make it work with Jen, as opposed to what we so frequently see with the chefs looking at themselves as the MAN in the kitchen.  It is a subtle, but huge difference.


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#1484

Tarasme

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 9:37 AM

Re: Bryan V

 

LOVE Bryan. As far as his culinary skills, he appears to be doing just fine- didn't James say something to the effect that's Bryan's EC dish was one of the best composed of the entire competition? And, though he didn't beat Doug- nacho hater- in the QC, he's still been mostly top three to four throughout.

 

Being a girl that HATES Danica Patrick because she is not a top tier driver but gets WAY more press than she deserves because of her gonads, I kinda hate it that Jen remains in the competition at all- seemingly simply because she's a chick. I'd love to believe that the production team had the dble elim/ save a chef planned, but it irks me that it worked out to look like it was a last ditch effort to keep a girl around.

 

So- I much prefer Bryan- who, to me, is thoughtful about all manner of the product he puts out to David Burke who's now coming across as Mr. Sloppy. Or Jen. Or Sang, who- to me- is a great technologist but has a hard time losening the ties that bind. Sometimes Sang takes his lemons and produces something great, but the past episode showed how it doesn't always come together awesomely for him.

 

Heck, even Doug had a week when the diners and the judges really didn't get it. And he was pretty verbal about how it irked him that they didn't get it (I believe he commented that their palates weren't educated enough or some such).


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#1485

theatremouse

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 9:44 AM

If you are on a team and part of your and your partner's score depends on how well the dishes play, it seems sort of selfish to just pick a dish you know and let your partner try to match it if he can, especially knowing there are far fewer dishes that can be made cold anyway and many fish don't work well cold.

They decided together that Sang would smoke his fish. Sang forgot/failed to get wood chips. He made that sauce that would supposedly make his fish taste smokey. I believe Gail even said when eating Sang's fish that if it had actually been smoked it would've worked.

 

Could Bryan have rejiggered his dish when Sang ended up sans wood chips? Maybe, but they both seemed to be under the impression, possibly for different reasons, that both dishes would be smokey, despite Sang's workaround. Since Sang was literally in the middle of the store when time ran out, not at the till with Bryan, by the time it became impossible for Sang to actually smoke the fish, Bryan already had all his ingredients for his originally conceived dish. It might have been possible for them both to do something else that would've been more cohesive, but what I saw was both of them essentially acknowledging in THs that they'd agreed to do their own thing, and agreed to just run with "smoke" as the shared thread. 

 

Obviously, other stuff might have been edited out, but from what I saw onscreen, I don't see why there's any reason Bryan would've known that it wouldn't work or that he should consider completely changing his dish. If we'd seen Sang saying something like "I don't have the wood chips. This fish will be gross this way. We need to go a totally different route or we'll both be screwed" and Bryan showed reluctance to change, that'd be one thing. To me it seemed like he was just trusting that Sang had his half under control and went forward doing his best at what he'd planned.

 

If the ONLY way for that fish to be good served cold is smoked, then Sang was screwed no matter what as soon as he missed the chips, and nothing Bryan did or didn't do to his own dish would've made it better. I'm not sure if the judging in this one was worst-plate loses, then person whose responsibility on the worst place goes home or not, but if it were, then Bryan's half is probably the only reason Sang, whose food was spit out, didn't get eliminated.


Edited by theatremouse, Sep 6, 2013 @ 9:45 AM.

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#1486

SoManyWays

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 10:59 AM

or complaining his voice isn't respected enough in a team

 

In the case of Restaurant Wars, he was offering the benefit of experience which none of his teammates had.  If he's supposed to shut up and be humble in the presence of people who are more experienced chefs, why are his teammates not expected to shut up and be humble in the presence of someone who is a more experienced competitor?

 

And it turns out he was right and they should have listened to him.  So how is he wrong?

 

I don't get the sense that he feels entitled to win; I get the sense that he's frustrated at being so close so often.  Which doesn't exactly conform with him being "outclassed."

 

I'd think he'd make light of it instead of reacting like it was a personal affront to him as such an equally celebrated chef.

 

As you said, it was a personal affront.  (That is what "insulting" means.)  What's the appropriate reaction to being insulted by someone more famous than you?  "Grovel, grovel, thanks for noticing my existence, I'll just stand here mute and wait humbly for pearls of wisdom to drop from your lips"?  Being more celebrated doesn't mean you're entitled to insult lesser mortals.  A testy "No" points out the insult without escalating the matter -- works for me.


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#1487

aceplace57

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 12:27 PM

Bryan's food has improved in the years since he was on Top Chef. He used to get criticized for under seasoning. If I recall correctly under seasoning cost him the win against his brother. That hasn't been a problem so far on Masters. I've been impressed how well he's doing against chefs with 15 more years experience then him.


Edited by aceplace57, Sep 6, 2013 @ 8:18 PM.

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#1488

anonymiss

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 6:03 PM

 

 

And it turns out he was right and they should have listened to him.  So how is he wrong?

 

 

 

He wasn't "wrong" to offer his input. It was surprising to hear him complain and wonder aloud about his input not receiving attention, i.e., respect. I knew his suggestions were probably sound based on his having played this game before but I also thought: "Well, what did you expect?" Like, how can you be surprised they have less respect for you? It appears he expects to be regarded on the same level as a traditional "Masters" chef.


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#1489

jmhm

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 6:08 PM

It appears he expects to be regarded on the same level as a traditional "Masters" chef.

 

He graduated from the CIA, he worked for Charlie Palmer, and he has four successful restaurants in the suburbs people from DC travel to eat at. I'm not sure what differentiates him from a traditional Masters chef.


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#1490

SoManyWays

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 6:13 PM

It appears he expects to be regarded on the same level as a traditional "Masters" chef.

 

Considering he was included to compete against them, I don't think that's unreasonable.  Certainly not within the context of the show.


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#1491

WearyTraveler

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 8:34 PM

I liked Ali in the QF challenge. She seemed knowledgeable and very enthusiastic about it.  She got into the whole process and cheered the chefs on when the clock started running.  She was also very respectful in her criticisms of the dishes she didn't like and articulated her reasons well.  I hope we get to see more guests like her in the future.
 
My favorites for the win are Doug and Bryan, and I agree with the posters above that Bryan is not arrogant, but that he is frustrated with himself at coming in second so many times. I like that he doesn't bitch about his sous chef when the guy gets him in trouble, but he just soldiers on and adjusts to whatever disadvantages he's saddled with.  It was said during RW that had his team been on top, he would have been the winner, and his dishes have been praised a lot (except for the beet one - where I don't think he "ignored the kid aspect" since he cooked something his kids would eat), so, that puts him in the Masters category. Experience alone does not a Master make, IMO.  I think Bryan doesn't like conflict, he says his piece, and if the others listen, that's all good, if they don't he worries about his own food; which is fine, it is a competition, after all.
 
I think he knew Sang has a big ego, and he avoided conflict by not challenging Sang.  I also disagree that somehow Bryan dictated/decided that each one was going to do his own dish with "smoke" being the common thread.  Sang doesn't appear to be the kind of guy that is easily pushed around, and out of all the chefs there, I think he's the least likely to play follower without pushing back.  That was very clear in RW when all the other chefs just let him be.  Out of all the chefs in this edition of TCM (including the ones that have been eliminated already), I think Sang is the most arrogant.
 
Personality wise, I think my favorite is Doug.  He seems to be very easy going and to have the interpersonal skills necessary to deal with big egos without compromising his own vision.  That's an art.  I particularly liked his TH regarding Jen's incessant talking in the kitchen, where he said it annoyed him, but that he thought that was her way to deal with stress and that since she wasn't messing anything up in the kitchen, he just decided to deal with the talking and move on. Very effective way to approach a difficult situation. Being a dog lover, who contributes to rescue organizations often and currently owning a rescued dog who came to me with some behavioral issues, I also like his charity the best.
 
And David Burke is a sweetheart.  I wouldn't mind a top three of David, Doug and Bryan; but based on the judges season long comments, I think it will be Doug, Bryan and Sang.
 
My favorite part of the episode was the chefs hanging out at the restaurant, eating together, relaxing and having a good time. I don't think we have seen that kind of camaraderie and respect on any TC regular edition, except perhaps on All-Stars, after the episode where they went to Ellis Island and found out about their ancestors.
 
As a fun note: Michael V. (Bryan's little brother) is the one usually described with the "arrogant" and "entitled" adjectives.  He did a guest spot on Suburgatory (a sitcom) where he played the most extreme version of arrogant, entitled chef; basically making fun of himself. It was hilarious.


Edited by WearyTraveler, Sep 6, 2013 @ 11:14 PM.

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#1492

DrGirlfriend

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 10:42 PM

Bryan V. as a hottie-type chef is so weird to me because when I see him - especially in his slightly-plumped up version - he reminds me of no one as much as Tim Heidecker. Not an ugly guy, but... if you've seen any of his shows... he's, uh, not exactly a pin-up.


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#1493

anonymiss

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Posted Sep 6, 2013 @ 11:04 PM

He graduated from the CIA, he worked for Charlie Palmer, and he has four successful restaurants in the suburbs people from DC travel to eat at. I'm not sure what differentiates him from a traditional Masters chef.

 

Since they can't sustain the original premise and each season the quality dilutes, they should rename it something that resembles MasterChef's "Professionals" spin-off. That way you don't need to be a Hubert Keller or even a David Burke. You can be a Bryan Voltaggio.


Edited by anonymiss, Sep 7, 2013 @ 12:18 AM.

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#1494

Mlle Poilane

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Posted Sep 7, 2013 @ 11:50 AM

I kept getting the names of the Volts mixed up when they appeared on TC, so it's nice to see them branch out and establish their own personalities and  restaurants.

 

I LOVE Bryan.  I didn't until this  show.  I see Bryan as having a modest demeanor.  You almost never hear him brag about a dish he's made.  I also see him as a quiet family man and a serious chef.  As a matter of fact, both brothers seem to have been brought up right.  When Michael was battling Bobby Flay on Iron Chef, and he and Bobby already knew each other, he addressed Bobby as "Chef Flay" or "Chef Flay, sir."  He's a little more outgoing than Bryan is, but he's still serious about his work.  Neither one of them brags about their success or their dishes that I've noticed.

 

I think on this show that Bryan is feeling the sting of not  having won anything.  That has to be hard on the ego, especially with such esteemed chefs surrounding him.  I also give him kudos for getting along so well with Sang.  He gave Sang plenty of room to set the pace and, I thought, did a great job of molding his own dish around Sang's ideas.


Edited by Mlle Poilane, Sep 7, 2013 @ 11:52 AM.

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#1495

csichick

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Posted Sep 7, 2013 @ 9:32 PM

From the Washington Post article linked to upthread, doesn't sound like the Voltaggio brothers grew up in any nurturing environment to me. More like they succeeded in spite of their childhood environment.

 

The oldest of three children, Voltaggio bounced between his mother and father after they divorced when he was 7. He and his siblings lived with their mother, Sharon, until she went through a second divorce; that’s when Bryan and his younger brother, Michael, were sent packing to Jefferson, just outside Frederick, to live with their father, John, a Maryland state trooper.

 


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#1496

Suzy Derkins

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Posted Sep 7, 2013 @ 9:54 PM

If it weren't for his "pretty blue eyes" which was exposed on his Top Chef days, his one restaurant at the time would have continued to fade into obscurity.

 

 

 

Bryan himself said no one was checking for him prior to Top Chef and that Volt was in danger of folding.

 

Maybe Volt would have folded; maybe not. He did say that the restaurant was struggling right before he appeared on "Top Chef," but it hadn't been open for very long and was already getting a lot of great press. I actually ate there for the first time the week before Bryan's season of "Top Chef' began - not because of the "Top Chef" connection (I didn't even know that Bryan was going to be on the show) but because I"d wanted to try it after reading great reviews in Washingtonian magazine, the Post, and other places that I don't remember right now. Of course good press isn't a guarantee of success, but there was a lot of buzz about the relatively-new restaurant, and we'll never know what would've happened if not for "Top Chef."

 

People have been saying since season three of TCM that they are getting to the point where there is little practical difference between the "Masters" ad the really good contenders on "Top Chef" classic. In terms of his restaurant's success, its acclaim, his role in changing the local food scene, etc., I think that Bryan is totally in the same class as, say, Naomi Pomeroy who was on TCM two seasons ago. His cooking techniques and flavor combinations are absolutely, positively perfect. Of course plenty of other "Top Chef" contestants could have been equally worthy of competing on TCM, but I can't fault them for choosing Bryan who was a fan favorite.

 

 

 

In the case of Restaurant Wars, he was offering the benefit of experience which none of his teammates had.  If he's supposed to shut up and be humble in the presence of people who are more experienced chefs, why are his teammates not expected to shut up and be humble in the presence of someone who is a more experienced competitor?

 

This, totally! My husband and I watched that episode together and we were both shocked that they weren't taking his advice. Seriously, he's one of just a handful of competitors who has actually done well at Restaurant Wars. Even if they didn't consider Bryan to be a true peer in terms of his cooking experience, he WAS the only expert at Restaurant Wars. And what do you know... he was right. They definitely should have listened to him.


Edited by Suzy Derkins, Sep 7, 2013 @ 9:55 PM.

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#1497

aradia22

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Posted Sep 8, 2013 @ 12:53 PM

This episode was kind of depressing. I was fine with the jumping out of a plane and cooking in a field because that was the first challenge and the person who went home didn't finish plating so it felt like that was just a case of weeding out the weakest in the pack. But this episode... first nachos. Then 30 minutes of shopping time with no idea what protein they would be getting and then having to be satisfied with whatever was left in the truck. Choice of the main component of your dish after you've chosen your other ingredients... there was no way we weren't going to have some disasters. I loved that Douglas and Jennifer rose to the occasion but yeah, this episode just made me sad.

 

I think Sang got really lucky this episode. Basically, I think the judges feel lukewarm about Neal and he hasn't really put out great food this season so they eliminated the weaker chef instead of the weaker dish.


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#1498

ratgirlagogo

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Posted Sep 8, 2013 @ 4:08 PM


Wtf was the seafood guys saying we have a lot of local product "some John Dory from New Zealand."
WTF indeed. This fucking hypocritical show.  I think Hugh Acheson is the only one to have mentioned it in the Bravo blogs, too.
 
Having the real Gidget there was probably the highlight of the show - and no, Hugh, I'm not over 60 (getting there, of course).  That and Doug suggesting to Sang that he go stage at Hostess to learn how to make an apple pie.
 
How did Jennifer win over Sue????

Edited by ratgirlagogo, Sep 8, 2013 @ 4:09 PM.

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#1499

jmhm

jmhm

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Posted Sep 8, 2013 @ 6:32 PM

How did Jennifer win over Sue????

 

I really don't understand that either. 

 

The whole women can't cook and breed conversation was just unplumbed depths of squirmy to watch. I don't think anyone should have kids they aren't interested in having, but presenting that choice as the only responsible option if you want a food career (with the men nodding their heads knowingly) struck me as dazzlingly sexist. I kind of thought less of her for it.


Edited by jmhm, Sep 8, 2013 @ 6:33 PM.

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#1500

ratgirlagogo

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Posted Sep 8, 2013 @ 8:11 PM

The whole women can't cook and breed conversation was just unplumbed depths of squirmy to watch. I don't think anyone should have kids they aren't interested in having, but presenting that choice as the only responsible option if you want a food career (with the men nodding their heads knowingly) struck me as dazzlingly sexist. I kind of thought less of her for it.

I didn't think less of her, but certainly did note how many of the men there who nodded their heads knowingly had a WIFE at home who took care of the kids that they were able to have without risking their careers.  I don't think less of those men either, by the way - it's just a sad statement of how things are in our oh-so-free un-sexist society.


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