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5-8: "Lady Lazarus" 2012.05.06


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#361

Ginandtonic

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 1:11 AM

I keep hoping the episodes will get more interesting, but I am just bored with it all. I miss the days of "Guy walks into an advertising agency", that was great writing. I think this is my last season.

I have never heard of eating Cool Whip by itself, just as a topping. I've never even heard of it being advertised as something to eat by itself, has anybody heard of that or is that something that they dropped?

#362

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 1:40 AM

I love eating cool whip by itself. In one of the Ramona Quimby books (which is set in the 60's or 70's I believe..?) Ramona wants, instead of a cake for her birthday, just a big pile of whipped cream with candles stuck in it. Not cool whip, but the same idea.

#363

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 1:44 AM

Although Peggy has legitimate reasons to be annoyed for Don's lack of focus on work, she should not have aired those grievances in front of the client. I also don't think there was any real excuse for her not learning her lines. Don didn't make himself available to rehearse, but she could have practiced them with Stan or Ginsberg. Sure she's mad at him for coasting while she's working, but it was unprofessional to sabotage the presentation by snapping at Don and fighting with him in front of the female Heinz employee at the testing lab.

I also think that although Peggy is putting in long hours, she is not actually accomplishing much. It's landing the account rather than effort that counts. (Which puts lazy grasshopper Roger ahead of industrious ant Peggy this episode.)

#364

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 3:38 AM

I don't think Peggy and Don (or even Ken) were even aware that someone was still in the room. They waited until the two guys had left and seemed to have completely forgotten about the woman's existence until she told Don he couldn't smoke. (Or maybe it's just that I'd forgotten she was even there, lol, but it definitely felt as if the scene was played to make it seem as if they didn't realize they were arguing in front of the client, otherwise neither would have gone there.) And Don is the one who picked that fight; Peggy staying quiet wouldn't have made them look any better anyway. Don still would have been going off on her in front of the No Smoking lady, and he would have looked like a bully.

We also don't know how much Peggy actually rehearsed on her own - she complained that she only rehearsed once with Don, who half-assed it. Practicing with Stan for example would not have been the same, he probably would have been making a bunch of jokes and the two would have started laughing and riffing with each other (which is the point of rehearsing with the guy you're gonna be play-acting with, to become comfortable enough with them that it becomes like natural banter). Likewise, that's why Megan and Don brought so much charm to it, those two have chemistry together and if Megan had said "just try it" he would not have even noticed that she didn't say "taste." But he wasn't cooperating with Peggy at all and thus, their 'banter' was unnatural and stiff. She really didn't duff her lines that badly but Don's attitude only made her more obviously nervous.

Peggy seems to be pretty self-sufficient when it comes to copywriting and supervising others, but she still needs a mentor to help guide her through the "director" phase of the job, which actually isn't much about being creative - going from creating and presenting the pitch to closing the sale of the pitch, and learning how to manage various types of client personalities. As creative director Don has to be as much a salesperson as the accounts team in that regard. But Don being mostly absent this season pretty much has made Peggy the de facto CD and she simply is not ready for the sales part of that role yet. I don't even know if she wants that role - she loves copywriting and craves recognition for her hard work, but does she want the non-creative aspects of the job, too? The schmoozing and boozing and "boring" client dinners that Don goes on, is she at all interested in putting in that work? If not, then it is no wonder she is feeling frustrated; she is being placed in a position she doesn't even want, let alone is capable of handling.

My sister eats frozen Cool Whip by itself. I don't know how she does it - something about Cool Whip makes me super queasy, so I can only eat a tiny, tiny bit at a time. But I know a lot of people who like it that much, or who will just spoon a few dollops over some fruit or something.

I'm somewhere in the middle on how I feel about this season. I still like it and don't really have any complaints about it, I guess. But this season is definitely not nearly as sharp as seasons 1-3, and I do agree that this is a product of Weiner buying into his own hype. (I had the same feeling during season 4.) I guess it's a good thing for me that I nonetheless have enjoyed what we've seen so far because I don't expect the rest of season five to get much better than that.

Edited by Thegirliscrazy, May 8, 2012 @ 3:39 AM.


#365

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 5:48 AM

I have never heard of eating Cool Whip by itself, just as a topping. I've never even heard of it being advertised as something to eat by itself, has anybody heard of that or is that something that they dropped?


I do it all the time but never thought of it being advertised that way.

#366

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 6:13 AM

So yes, in Pete's case SCDP likely has a life insurance policy on him that pays the company and not his family.


But if someone is that high-up in a company, wouldn't the company also provide them with a personal life insurance policy, that pays out to their family?

I'm hoping that the insurance salesman was just bullshitting Pete, by mentioning the practice of employers taking out their own policies on employees, and then falsely suggesting that employers rarely offer any insurance coverage beyond that.

It's just such a horrific scenario - someone is told they have life insurance through their job, so they don't bother to take out any other life insurance, and then when they die it turns out the only life insurance they ever had benefits their employer only.

#367

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 6:23 AM

I don't think the SCDP Cool Whip ad was promoting eating it by itself. It was just a very product focused ad for a new product - try it, you'll like it! It's just like whipped cream! They could have taken an approach of showing how to use it on fruit, etc., but that's a different creative choice on how to market the product.

#368

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 6:44 AM

I have a feeling that starting a new agency might be in the cards for Peggy, Ken, et al.

Wouldn't it be a kick for this to happen, for Don to realize that he can no longer function as a headliner at an agency since he's perceived as a "dishonest man" by corporate heads, and he comes in through the back door at Peggy & Ken's new agency? Dying & rebirth- just a thought.

Yes, Cool Whip was initially marketed as something so great that one would be tempted to eat it almost on its own. See here.

Edited by Decormaven, May 8, 2012 @ 6:44 AM.


#369

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 7:01 AM

But if someone is that high-up in a company, wouldn't the company also provide them with a personal life insurance policy, that pays out to their family?

I'm hoping that the insurance salesman was just bullshitting Pete, by mentioning the practice of employers taking out their own policies on employees, and then falsely suggesting that employers rarely offer any insurance coverage beyond that.


Howard was being the stereotypical life insurance salesman in that scene - every comment was designed to appeal to the customer's (in this case, Pete) fears. Pete even critiques his pitch ("I thought you'd be better at this"). It makes sense that SCDP has key person coverage benefiting the partners, but also offers Pete a policy that benefits his family as well. Life insurance was a non-taxable fringe benefit (maybe it still is?).

Pete's "you're right, I don't have coverage" was a lie to get another chance to see Beth.

#370

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 7:10 AM

But if someone is that high-up in a company, wouldn't the company also provide them with a personal life insurance policy, that pays out to their family?


Yes, they provide him with personal life insurance. I and several others mentioned this upthread. Back then, he probably didn't have to pay a dime for any type of coverage, even health insurance. Those were the days before ambulance-chasing lawyers and greedy drug companies caused health care coverage to go through the roof.


I don't expect the rest of season five to get much better than that.


It's my hope that the season thus far has been a slow-burning cigarette and MW just hasn't laid the firecracker next to it in the ashtray yet. I think each show has been unique and interesting, some more than others, but I am really hoping we get off Megan and onto something more Mad Men-like.

#371

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 7:28 AM

Yes, they provide him with personal life insurance. I and several others mentioned this upthread. Back then, he probably didn't have to pay a dime for any type of coverage, even health insurance.


That's exactly my point. The scenario the insurance salesman was selling him sounds completely absurd.

#372

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 8:26 AM

I think Pete has felt from pretty much infancy that there's a secret out there that no one's telling him, and everybody is in on the joke. He tries to be ingratiating to win the secret, manipulative to steal the secret, angry to scare the secret out in the open so he can pounce on it. Every time he sees a window open he dives in, thrashing around and crying for the secret to reveal itself so he can just finally be like everyone else, be happy. He ends up trying to frantically bond with perfect strangers in a mad lurching to finally end his quest.


I'm not sure if this was mentioned in the original post (I'm quoting the quote because I couldn't find the post it came from) but this is precisely the plot of The Crying of Lot 49, so I think this ties in just perfectly with what is going on with Pete. The whole story is about someone chasing around with a burning desire to find and uncover this grand plot and then at the end you never know if there was any 'plot' in the first place. Part of you wants to believe there was because you become so invested in it, the other part of you wants to laugh or cry at the thought that you've become so invested in a complete farce.

I'm new to the show and just started watching this season. I guess I'm not as bothered by Megan due to that, but I know there's a lot of stuff that I'm missing (must.watch.entire.series.). I wonder if Don will surrender to the void, the unknowing what the future with Megan holds, or if he will attempt to control her. Don, surrender to the void. She isn't gone, she's just gone.

#373

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 8:48 AM

It's just such a horrific scenario - someone is told they have life insurance through their job, so they don't bother to take out any other life insurance, and then when they die it turns out the only life insurance they ever had benefits their employer only.


It's called Dead Peasants Insurance, and a lot of companies do exactly that.

Anyway, I thought the episode was good, although I'm still waiting for Don to realize that Megan is a total phony.

It really irked me that she made her contempt for the advertising business so clear, all the while, living off that same business.

#374

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 8:50 AM

Yes, Cool Whip was initially marketed as something so great that one would be tempted to eat it almost on its own. See here.

Thanks for finding that video, Decormaven. I was just going to search for one myself. I'm surprised I don't really remember that commercial, since I'm a child of the 60's.

I thought Don & Megan's pitch was great. They were charming, and I can see that ad really working. In a way it reminded me of the James Garner/Mariette Hartley Polaroid commercials. As I recall, those were more teasing, whereas Don & Megan's was straightforward and sincere, but the chemistry of a married couple (real or faked) felt true.


"I grew up in the 30s, my dream was indoor plumbing!"

I still find it interesting that Don has made many references this season to his youth and experience growing up. I'm sure that's Megan's influence.


I'm glad some folks like Megan because it would be depressing to think everyone is feeling as 'meh' about this season as I am.

I'd like her a lot better if she wasn't suddenly the focal point of the show.

I think one reason why I'm not critical of this character is that I don't see her as the focal point. To me it's always Don, and Megan's purpose is to affect Don. I'm interested in what happens with Megan because I'm interested in what happens to Don. That's not to say that I think she's a cardboard character propping up Don, because I think there have been many good scenes that involve her.

#375

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 8:57 AM

He's 40! Even in 1966, that wasn't the end of the line. And I don't agree that he lost his passion for advertising -- during Megan's midnight confession, Don said to her how exciting it is when you're driving down the street and see your words on a billboard -- doesn't she get that? He didn't get that she didn't. But I think he is still in love with advertising; he sat in on the meeting with Chevalier Blanc, he was involved in the Cool Whip campaign, he went for dinner with some client the night that Megan snuck off for her evening audition.


Life expectancy for someone born in 1926, which is how you base a person's life expectancy, was 55.5 years old. And lets face it, he may look good, but his lifestyle doesn't scream of him outliving the normal.

Amazing to think that, but Don is pretty old in 1966 terms, much older than 40 today. Add in the fact that the push from all the clients is young, young, young, and Don just doesn't identify with it, and he suddenly looks like a dinosaur

#376

janie2002

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 9:10 AM

I find it annoying that Don and Peggy think so highly of Megan for following her dream. The love glasses are really on, she will be another bored, older house wife with a rich husband how Joanie said.
It's easy to fail when you have a rich husband to foot the bill. You don't get any admiration from me. Hasn't it been stated before by 60's standards Meagan is gettting older? she is 27, married and a step mom and now she thinks she can make it on broadway?

#377

PRgal

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 9:18 AM

Yes, Cool Whip was initially marketed as something so great that one would be tempted to eat it almost on its own. See here.


Ew.

/back to our regularly scheduled program

Edited by PRgal, May 8, 2012 @ 9:22 AM.


#378

rogaine2233

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 9:23 AM

I find it annoying that Don and Peggy think so highly of Megan for following her dream. The love glasses are really on, she will be another bored, older house wife with a rich husband how Joanie said.
It's easy to fail when you have a rich husband to foot the bill. You don't get any admiration from me. Hasn't it been stated before by 60's standards Meagan is gettting older? she is 27, married and a step mom and now she thinks she can make it on broadway?


But as Peggy said, "Megan is good at everything!" And if you don't believe her, just look at the way it's been shoved down our throats this season.

#379

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 9:26 AM

I was actually wondering about Megan's line "you are exactly how I hoped you'd be". I took it to mean, slightly cynically, that she knew somewhere deep inside when she married him that he would be her gateway into finding herself. She could try different things and he'd pay the bills. It's part of the excitment he brought to her: an older charming man stepping into her life to take are of her. He helped her try copywriting, now he is willing to let her try acting again. I'm not attributing negative intent to her, this all happened organically in her life.

She seems progressive with the fashions, music and all, but she's the most retrograde one of the bunch. In a sense, she portrays the boomers, or at least those that marched for all sorts of causes and then led really ordinary, not revolutionary, lives. (this isnt meant as a detailed analysis of the Boomer generation or indictment of everyone. Just a summary view that came up when I thought of Megan's life.)

I also love that they show how each generation had members that reacted differently to the turmoil around them. Roger tried LSD and Don doesnt quite get The Beatles. Beth dresses like her grandmother, while Peggy smokes up at work. Joan still wears her pen to make her breasts obvious (hard to hide them!) yet she willingly walked out of her marriage. It's all fascinating.

#380

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 9:33 AM

One of the little details I'm loving this season is the fact that Joan's hair is done but just slightly messy. It's not the perfect coiff it used to be and that makes sense with her being a single mom and all.

#381

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 9:36 AM

Oh and on life insurance, it's typical to have Key Man insurance to protect the group. It's also not abnormal not to offer benefits like personal life insurance (especially with a small group and people like Bertram and Roger who pull the premiums up) when money is tight. I think Howard was right and Pete just misunderstood. Or he didnt want to ask so as not to sound ignorant in matters relating to partnerships.

#382

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 9:41 AM

- Peggy's behaviors confuse me. Not all the time, but she gets really pissed off at kind of random times. She seems perpetually annoyed this season.

I have to agree with this. Don definitely had it coming in that test kitchen, but I thought Peggy's blow up was over the top. I think she was just as guilty as what she accused Don of: being angry at someone else. I think Peggy was pissed at herself for blowing the pitch and her anger at herself was projected onto him (in addition to her annoyance at his half-assedness). She is frustrated. And she and Don really do see each other as extensions of themselves.

The Joan-Don interaction was odd. She was cold, I thought. Wouldn't be that unusual except that they have had such a warm and comfortable relationship in the past.

I was pleasantly surprised by Alexis Bledel. Less so by Mr. Belding.

#383

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 9:42 AM

I was actually wondering about Megan's line "you are exactly how I hoped you'd be".


That was a weird line and I was surprised that not one of the MM reviews I read even mentioned it. Does it mean "gee, I married you without knowing a thing about you and got lucky?" Does it mean "this is the way I had hoped you would be, not some caveman who chases me around the apartment"?

Don's face was inscrutable when she said this.

Edited by rogaine2233, May 8, 2012 @ 9:43 AM.


#384

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 10:12 AM

"I grew up in the 30s, my dream was indoor plumbing!" Honest to God, I was expecting him to punctuate that statement with "Kids today, they don't realize how great they have it!" Shut up, Don. I refuse to believe that there were no dreamers during the Depression! Hell, if anything, that was the ideal time to have dreams, because they helped you maintain your sanity! Why do you suppose screwball comedies, Frank Capra films, or Astaire/Rogers films were so popular? Because they were escapist fantasies that helped people forget how shitty reality was for a few hours! Don is an idiot.


But I think that glosses over the actual point Don was making, which was true. When you grow up with nothing, basic comfort is a fantasy--hence those screwball comedies where everyone is rich. Megan doesn't dream of creature comforts because she takes them for granted. Sure there were plenty of people who had dreams during the Depression, but the kind of attitude Megan is represented really is something rather new, because there is a different relationship to stability. Even dreaming about being a movie star is very different for a poor girl in the 30s and a girl like Megan in the 60s. Megan wants to be "special" in that modern way, creating art. Very different than,
say, a young Joan Crawford.

She's uber-competent and breezing over issues. She's got the house, the kid, the suburbs and *insert Pete's name here" a husband who is a good provider. That doesn't mean I dislike Trudy. I think Trudy is in her own version of a lavender haze and doesn't see Pete's pain.


Totally agree. I separate Pete's actions from his feelings here--being sympathetic to the latter doesn't mean always approving of the former, and seeing the problems in the marriage is not a way of blaming Trudy for Pete straying. But I don't think we can just assume that Trudy's being awesome and Pete's just that perverse and bored with his awesome house, wife and daughter. I've said how it seemed like the show made a point of separating Megan from the rest of the creative staff. I think the show's also made an interesting, darker point with Pete and Trudy. Every single scene they've had together alone (as opposed to with others like at the dinner party or birthday party) has been late at night with Trudy either going off to sleep or already sleeping. In this ep, too, Pete's up late at the office (so is Peggy) and arrives at Cos Cobb in the dark to drive himself (recklessly and badly) home and Trudy's not there (not sure if Alison Brie would have been in this ep if she was available). That seems like a strong choice that's no accident. It seems both thematic--showing Pete awake and prowling around in the darkness while Trudy sleeps with no idea what's going on--and a practical thing. Pete's days have gotten very long and his new life is more isolated. He's been staring into the void for a while. And in Pete's case it's a rather Lovecraftian one where the void stares back.

Pretty much what I expected. I think MW cast her precisely because her big blue eyes match Pete as does her little girl look match his little boy look. There was a physical pairing centered on vulnerability that really resonated with me.


I've been disturbed by comments I read elsewhere turning this situation into another au pair thing with Pete forcing herself on this woman when it read to me more like what she's saying, that she confuses Pete, has her own agenda and is also conflicted. He might have entertained some notions of having a Howard-type existance, but it doesn't work at all. And it just does seem fitting that if Pete's actually going to connect to anyone viscerally it's someone who's somehow also damaged and trapped and desperate. As creepy as Pete's speech to Harry is in the context of rape culture, it is a pretty accurate description of his interactions with Beth.

I also was struck by how beautiful--and hot!--Pete was in that scene. I've never in my life thought that way about Pete. I think someone on these boards once mentioned a spare tire wrt to Pete early on to go with his receding hair. No sign of it in this ep! Anyway, It also made me think of the quote someone here mentioned where someone described another person as getting younger in that way you could only do in the 60s. This is the first time old man Pete seemed really vital and young and not just baby-faced and pinched. Pete's no Megan--I don't know what it would take for him to be content. But this ep had at least a moment where he seemed to see the possibility of something and for Pete that's significant. Love the analysis of the lyrics as they play over the characters--love is everyone does seem like the one for Pete. He does seem most desperately driven by a need to be loved while also being the least capable of inspiring it in anyone. Trudy is fantastic, but she's also very tied to the conventional life Pete's been taught to want and has been taught should make him happy but doesn't. If she only understands that side of him and "doesn't hear" the rest, she's missing a lot.

And that's a contrast to Don/Megan in this ep where Megan can wake him up and tell him how dissatisfied she is at her money-making job and he'll listen, eventually. I'm not sure if Trudy can help rewarding Pete for being the conventional husband.

Edited by Sister Magpie, May 8, 2012 @ 10:13 AM.


#385

Decormaven

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 10:19 AM

Don's face was inscrutable when she said this. rogaine2233

I just rewatched part of the episode; I think this is the tell of the episode. You don't see any physical reaction from Don. Is this where Don wakes up and sees that what he said in Tomorrowland, "I feel like myself when I'm with you, but the way I always wanted to feel," is invalid? Sure, you can feel "complete" in the presence of another but true completeness come from within. Maybe that's why we got the shot of the abyss/elevator - the realization is upon him.

#386

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 10:20 AM

But I think that glosses over the actual point Don was making, which was true. When you grow up with nothing, basic comfort is a fantasy--hence those screwball comedies where everyone is rich. Megan doesn't dream of creature comforts because she takes them for granted. Sure there were plenty of people who had dreams during the Depression, but the kind of attitude Megan is represented really is something rather new, because there is a different relationship to stability. Even dreaming about being a movie star is very different for a poor girl in the 30s and a girl like Megan in the 60s. Megan wants to be "special" in that modern way, creating art. Very different than,
say, a young Joan Crawford.


Yeah and the Beatles by 1966 were the richest most popular band in the world and had all material wealth and it still wasn't enough for some of them. It still wasn't fulfilling to them particularly to Lennon and George Harrison who went seeking spiritual enlightenment from the Mahareshi and going to India in 1968 with others like Mia Farrow, whose marriage to Frank Sinatra I believe, mirrors Megan and Don's.

Don was alone in not getting the Beatles' new direction, as this clip from a 2000 Beatles TV specialfeaturing a 1967 American Bandstand clip of them debuting "Strawberry Fields Forever" shows. Kids who still thought of the Beatles as like the Monkees were like "What is this?"

Edited by Limbonaut, May 8, 2012 @ 10:26 AM.


#387

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 10:25 AM

When Betty got the modeling job for Coca-Cola, Don seemed to be supportive initially. But it was McCann-Erickson (who had the Coke account back then) and they were really after Don, not Betty...is that correct? I can't recall. I seem to remember Don turning them down and the modeling offer being withdrawn.


Don knew from the beginning that they were only auditioning Betty to get to him. He wasn't upset about it because he didn't take it seriously as a possibility.

She lashed out at the Heinz clients because her personal frustrations with Abe spilled over into her work...


I got the impression that she was just imitating Don there, not that she was sincerely expressing her own emotions. He's used that tactic on clients before.

#388

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 10:32 AM

Ok like many others I am hoping that we are shifting away from the Megan-centric plotlines.

I am most entertained by and into the Pete plotline. Loved the train station pick-up, very possible in my eyes (having ridden the train for years)although I am not so sure she actually locked her keys in the car but saw a chance to be "reckless" again

The elevator shaft, while heavy-handed perhaps, was another great moment in the building creep of this season. The dream of killing the girl, the elevator shaft...hmmm...

I am definitely ready for something big to happen to break the tension and become compelling I almost wish that Don HAD killed that girl so while everything that has gone on has been happening Don is hidingand wrestling with the fact that he killed a casual aquaintance and the stress from that!

#389

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 10:38 AM

She's uber-competent and breezing over issues. She's got the house, the kid, the suburbs and *insert Pete's name here" a husband who is a good provider. That doesn't mean I dislike Trudy. I think Trudy is in her own version of a lavender haze and doesn't see Pete's pain.



And when she coudln't have children Pete made sure she would never have children. No adoption. No question. (And Pete was over the moon happy when he found out she was pregnant. He couldn't stop smiling. He kept telling everyone. It isn't like he didn't want that.) But she accepted it and lived with it. When he didn't want to visit or see her parents he didn't and she had to live with it. As he said to her once "your parents must think I only ever say no". When he had an affair while she was with her parents she accepted it with minimal fuss. She went to beg her ex to publish Pete's story and Pete's only response was why didn't she sleep with him to do it. I can't imagine she was too satisfied or content with her marriage at that point. When Pete wanted to leave SC she encouraged him and she encouraged him to start SCDP. His dreams not hers.

Pete wasn't thinking about her suffering or pain when she coudln't have her dreams of kids and a happy united family. So, I don't see much difference now when the shoe is on the other foot.


Pete has to live in the suburbs. Trudy had to face the prospect of life without children because Pete didn't believe in adoption (and, again, he was thrilled when she got pregnant). Eventhough being a mother was as important to her as Manhattan is to him. Trudy had to deal with a husband who cheated and who wanted her to cheat for his benefit. I can't really see how he is the one who got it worse here. .

I was actually wondering about Megan's line "you are exactly how I hoped you'd be".


I think Megan intended it to mean Don is everything she wants and he is more than enough for her (knowing that he is Dick Whitman). But I think what it reveals is she didn't know this man at all when she married him. And was hoping he would be this great supportive guy. He is now but that is not his natural mode.

Edited by Cherith, May 8, 2012 @ 10:46 AM.


#390

peeayebee

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Posted May 8, 2012 @ 10:44 AM

I find it annoying that Don and Peggy think so highly of Megan for following her dream. The love glasses are really on, she will be another bored, older house wife with a rich husband how Joanie said.

But as Peggy said, "Megan is good at everything!" And if you don't believe her, just look at the way it's been shoved down our throats this season.

I like that different characters see Megan differently, thru their own lenses. Don and Peggy both think Megan is terrific; however, Joan does not, and neither does Pete. Others in the office don't either.


I was actually wondering about Megan's line "you are exactly how I hoped you'd be".

I just took that as a romantic line. If she'd said, "You're exactly how I expected you to be," it would sound rather controlling. Some people get married thinking they know exactly how their partners will be thruout the marriage, while other people expect change, but not for the worse. I think it's honest for Megan to say that. She married him and hoped he would be understanding and supportive, and in this ep he has been.