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Trisha's Southern Kitchen


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#121

mushypeas

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Posted Nov 10, 2012 @ 4:35 PM

I've never heard of saltines in cornbread dressing, but it makes sense in a retro recipe. And I bet it's delicious. We're a cornbread dressing family, and while I would never deviate from our own perfect ;-) family recipe, I loved seeing hers.

The turkey, on the other hand? Oh my God, no way. She is using a small bird, so I guess that's one reason why this method works and hasn't sickened them. But with the variation in ovens and the number of people who will potentially try this on a 16+ pound bird - well, I wouldn't promote this particular method.

BTW, did she place the stuffing inside the bird, too? Yuch, yuch, ...


No, she baked it separately in a glass dish.

Last thought...Anyone else love her sister? Such a pretty singing voice, too.

Edited by mushypeas, Nov 10, 2012 @ 4:40 PM.

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#122

PinkCupcake

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Posted Nov 10, 2012 @ 5:24 PM

We use saltines in our cornbread dressing - not sure why (it's my nana's recipe, and I never thought to ask her why she used them), but it tastes wonderful, so I don't question it too much, lol. And from what I've read, that way of roasting a turkey is not safe - too much time for bacteria to grow was what I remember reading. I just did a Google search and found an article on how to safely roast a turkey overnight, but that article didn't say anything about turning the oven off entirely (it was more about safely roasting at a low temp overnight). It may result in a moist bird, but I could never feel confident enough in the safety of the method to do it. At least she made dressing instead of stuffing - it'd be a shame to put such a yummy dish in danger!
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#123

vera charles

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Posted Nov 10, 2012 @ 5:51 PM

The ideal temperature for growing bacteria is between 40 and 140 degrees Farenheit, so leaving a turky sitting in a cooled-off oven overnight ought to create the perfect conditions for making people sick. People used to get up at 3:00 or 4:00 in the morning to roast a huge stuffed turkey all day long but that's pretty unusual nowadays. A reasonable sized turkey roasts in three or four hours and a fresh, unfrozen one takes even less time.
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#124

itsmejessica

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Posted Nov 10, 2012 @ 7:28 PM

The cornbread dressing needed somthing. I make my moms every year and it's pretty simple but it does have sage and celery. I add eggs. I never done crackers,but it sounds interesting. The Turkey no. I would be scared. I make the same sweet potato dish it really is yummy.
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#125

grisgris

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Posted Nov 10, 2012 @ 8:13 PM

Trisha's family is delightful, but I wondered why her husband and step-daughters weren't in this episode.

I'm being the old saw singing that I've never been a huge fan of Thanksgiving food, and I take after my late mother. I could tell she just hated that day and all of the food prep and she wasn't that crazy about the food either. Since she has passed, my sister and I have a new tradition of eating out that day! We don't have a bunch of leftovers and it works out just fine.

That said, I don't have much experience in preparing a turkey day meal, except for once or twice and it came out fine. However, I was shocked at Trisha's method of preparing the turkey. I think that the only way for that to work would be if you had a brand new and 100% calibrated oven so you were spot-on that the temperature was exactly 500 degrees. For her sake, Trisha did say that you should NOT open the oven and that she couldn't guarantee the results with a bird beyond 12-15 lbs. I know that I would never attempt that.

That dressing didn't look good to me at all. It definitely needed some celery or something more. It looked like just a bunch of random dry bread ingredients with some onion and greasy turkey "juice." I was also surprised that good Southern girls didn't prepare a gravy. They didn't address that or explain what they did with the giblets.

The family sing-along was fun and it was enjoyable show, although the recipes were nothing I'd want to try.
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#126

ToothbrushFence

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Posted Nov 10, 2012 @ 10:53 PM

Not necessarily defending the turkey, but she put it in a covered roaster with several cups of boiling water, basically creating a little mini steam oven in the oven. This setup should maintain a stable temperature for a fair amount of time. I would not want to try it because 12 lbs is pretty limiting and I've never heard of anyone making a turkey that small for Thanksgiving (might work for small families I guess).

My other thought was that if it didn't work and the turkey was half-cooked or overcooked, you would be pretty screwed. I know that's true of any cooking method, but at least with most typical turkey preparations, you are ostensibly awake and keeping an eye on how things are going. I would be tempted to have a backup turkey brining or in a salt rub if I were ever for some odd reason trying this recipe.

Edited by ToothbrushFence, Nov 10, 2012 @ 10:54 PM.

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#127

berenjena

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Posted Nov 10, 2012 @ 11:22 PM

She made her stuffing seperate.

I was thinking the same thing about the turkey method. I wondered how long it would take to go from 500 to 350 in an oven. I sometimes cook using residual heat for both stove and oven, as it is an old frugal housewife thing. But never a large bird for 7 hours. She said her momma would start it at midnight and in the morning the turkey would be done.

The sweet potato dish was my favorite. I have had it at every southern Thanksgiving I have been invited to. So glad she made the no marshmallow version. I could eat that every day.
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#128

fostersmom

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Posted Nov 10, 2012 @ 11:36 PM

I can't believe FN aired her turkey cooking tip. That's just dangerous. I just kept thinking it was setting up for some awesome Thanksgiving memories... of puking in the emergency room. I was only half assed watching this morning so I thought I had misheard her. Obviously not. Now I'm even more grossed out since I did see her use the pan "juice" in the dressing. Yum! Bacteria soup!

I have a question about the dressing. Did she put hard boiled eggs in it? I saw her peeling boiled eggs, saying she was using them in the dressing. My brain instantly thought she was talking about a salad dressing, not a stuffing dressing. I missed what she did with the hard boiled eggs. And the idea of hard boiled eggs in a dressing is really kind of bizarre to me.
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#129

jcbrown

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Posted Nov 11, 2012 @ 12:15 AM

Yeah, that turkey method was just scary. The other odd thing about this epi was that she cooked her dishes in a completely bizarre order. I have a spreadsheet I use to ensure all the dishes come out at the right time (hush, it works). The order in which she cooked things would have left her with things done at random times and not all at the right temperature for serving, IMHO.
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#130

itsmejessica

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Posted Nov 11, 2012 @ 3:13 AM

I have one question about the turkey? What time do they eat? If it is done by 7/8 in the a.m. Does that mean very early thanksgiving lunch?
I have never heard of hard boiled eggs in dressing either. In my earlier post I said I added eggs to my cornbread dressing,I meant raw eggs.
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#131

vera charles

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Posted Nov 11, 2012 @ 6:51 AM

What time do they eat? If it is done by 7/8 in the a.m. Does that mean very early thanksgiving lunch?

This is an argument that my husband and I have every year. According to his family (Virginia / North Carolina), it's a southern thing to eat the Thanksgiving meal at noon, then eat leftovers at dinnertime. In my family (Maryland / West Virginia), people show up at 4 pm and we eat at 6 pm. Since Trisha is southern, I'd bet they do eat at noon.

In the recipe on the FN website, their small nod to food safety is to say that, if you aren't serving the turkey right away, you should refrigerate it after cooking, until serving time. What? Find room in the refrigerator to keep it, then reheat it at dinnertime? This recipe keeps sounding worse and worse. I think I will continue to buy a fresh turkey at the organic farm near me and cook the turkey for 2.5 or 3 hours and serve it hot out of the oven, thanks anyway.

That dressing didn't look good to me at all. It definitely needed some celery or something more. It looked like just a bunch of random dry bread ingredients with some onion and greasy turkey "juice."

Last week, it was chicken pot pie with just chicken, canned soup and biscuit topping. This week, dressing with only onions and no other vegetables. What does she have against aromatics? Some kind of aversion to mirepoix?

I have a spreadsheet I use to ensure all the dishes come out at the right time

I don't have a spreadsheet per se, but I do keep my Thanksgiving recipes together in order with a timeframe list on top. I can make the entire meal in five hours from start to finish by working through my file.

Edited by vera charles, Nov 11, 2012 @ 8:49 AM.

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#132

mushypeas

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Posted Nov 11, 2012 @ 9:17 AM

Did she put hard boiled eggs in it? I saw her peeling boiled eggs, saying she was using them in the dressing. My brain instantly thought she was talking about a salad dressing, not a stuffing dressing. I missed what she did with the hard boiled eggs. And the idea of hard boiled eggs in a dressing is really kind of bizarre to me.


Yes, she put 3 chopped hard boiled eggs in the recipe. I've seen recipes with egg in dressing, so it didn't surprise me too much. And again, seemed very retro. People throw just about anything in dressing. The only thing that truly grosses me out is the addition of oysters, but I know some families love it that way.

I would add sage and celery to the dressing, too. The beauty of cornbread dressing, as opposed to plain bread dressing, is that the cornbread in and of itself provides so much flavor. Even unseasoned it's still pretty darned good.
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#133

captain1

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Posted Nov 11, 2012 @ 2:46 PM

I like Trisha and her show in general but this episode not so much. Scared of that turkey recipe! I think Vera Charles is right - I live in Virginia and have always done the middle of the day (although usually 1:30 or 2:00) meal. Then there's nothing better than a turkey sammich around 8:00 or so!

Thanksgiving is my all-time favorite holiday. I love the cooking and feasting!
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#134

Biosynth

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Posted Nov 14, 2012 @ 11:16 AM

I'm glad I'm not the only one not wanting to try the Salmonella special. And if it's done by 7, then it will be cold, even by noon. So reheating is involved. Ug.

I too thought "where's the gravy"?

I don't think I'll put hardboiled eggs in my stuffing.

The Sweet Potatoes did look good though, but I wouldn't mash them so much. I like them a little chunky.

I'm kind of wondering if they are a No Veggies Please kind of family, sort of like Pioneer Woman's family.
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#135

Enigmatics

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Posted Nov 15, 2012 @ 9:22 AM

I love hardboiled eggs in stuffing. It reminds me of my great-aunt's stuffing that she always made for Thanksgiving.
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#136

vera charles

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Posted Nov 16, 2012 @ 7:17 AM

What would be the point of putting a hardboiled egg in stuffing? I have heard of using raw eggs as a binding ingredient, but the few times I did that, I didn't care for the heavy, wet texture of the finished product, so I don't do it anymore. I prefer the looser, drier texture of bread cubes, broth, and aromatics, and I bake it outside the turkey for maximum crispiness.
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#137

Enigmatics

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Posted Nov 16, 2012 @ 9:39 AM

I guess it's a Southern thing, just like we put hard boiled eggs in our giblet gravy. To me, it just tastes good.
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#138

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Posted Nov 16, 2012 @ 11:21 AM

I've read reviews of the turkey recipe and most people say it comes out very moist. Almost mushy from what I can gather from descriptions.
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#139

fostersmom

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Posted Nov 16, 2012 @ 8:57 PM

I've read reviews of the turkey recipe and most people say it comes out very moist. Almost mushy from what I can gather from descriptions.


That's the bacteria soup being sucked back up by the meat.
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#140

Xingu

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 3:55 AM

OK. I've been kind to Trish when she's just fooling around with shit, but now she has me seriously pissed.

If she wants to do a cooking show she needs to start by going to some cooking school and learning the basics. She doesn't even know how to put a fucking lemon half in a lemon squeezer. She has no concept of knife skills. She doesn't even know the basics of kitchen sanitation and cross-contamination. She has no handle on dietetics which is why she, Garth and the girls are getting bigger by the day. She took her mother and grandmother's recipes and bastardized the hell out of them to the point where you may need to call the medics after consuming them.

Her turkey was anemic yet overdone.

She cooks as well as I sing. And that ain't pretty.

I offer Trish a deal: You stay out of the kitchen, and I'll stay out of the recording studio.

I am so fucking sick of these bored celebrities who think they have to share their ridiculous "recipes" with the rest of the world. Well, if they are so gung ho on sharing the recipes open a website and list them for free. But, noooo, Trish has to have a TV show and sell cookbooks to gain even more money. Aren't the millions you and Garth have earned enough? How much money is enough?

She is so fucking greedy. Everything about her is for the almighty fucking dollar. Her "recipes" are in every church cookbook ever made.

Just shut up and sing.

Edited by Xingu, Nov 17, 2012 @ 3:59 AM.

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#141

Pepperbird

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 3:34 PM

Aren't the millions you and Garth have earned enough? How much money is enough?


This greediness has always irked me too. It can take different forms--for example, one of the worst is Paula Deen getting all her relatives on her show or on shows of their own--and even having her grandbabies getting prepped for a future show--and spinning that off into cruises, food products, furniture, fashions, etc. for family and friends.

Apparently no one ever mentions "overexposure" to these celebrities. That's a kinder word than "greed," or undignified compulsive competition, which is at the heart of it.
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#142

mushypeas

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 3:45 PM

Aren't the millions you and Garth have earned enough? How much money is enough?


I don't understand the greed theory. I highly doubt she's doing it for more money, since she probably doesn't have to lift a finger to earn another dime for the rest of her life. A lot of these successful people are simply hard workers. And creative. And creativity isn't limited to just one thing.

She's got a name and can attract a following. She likes cooking, and her friends and family enjoy her cooking - so she has a show.

I'm not a country music fan. I haven't been inspired to make any of her recipes. But I like her and for the most part really enjoy her show. It's one of a few on FN I continue to watch.
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#143

clare 32

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 4:07 PM

I don't see the greed. Trisha likes to cook and FN has a slot open for her. Maybe she doesn't want to tour anymore. Maybe writing a cookbook and this show is making her happy right now. I've been a fan forever and wish she would make more music. Paula Deen, on the other hand, is the epitome of greed.
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#144

Xingu

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 4:42 PM

I don't understand the greed theory. I highly doubt she's doing it for more money, since she probably doesn't have to lift a finger to earn another dime for the rest of her life. A lot of these successful people are simply hard workers. And creative. And creativity isn't limited to just one thing.


I'm all for creativity. I love it. But I believe one should be competent in their field before one asks the public to buy ones product. IMO, Trisha is not. This is where the greed theory comes in. She's using her fame in a field that she is not competent in to gain more money. If the proceeds of her TV show and cookbooks went to charity I would feel differently. If she feels the need to share her family's recipes (such as they are) she could easily do so for free via the web. She chooses not to. To me, that's greed. And this is said by someone who truly likes Trisha and Garth as singers.
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#145

grisgris

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 7:00 PM

I also agree that I don't think Trisha is in this for money. It seems like almost everybody on FN has some other more lucrative "day job," like owning restaurants, catering, food writer, etc. We don't know what she does with her earnings, either. Maybe she does indeed make charitable donations from her FN earnings, but keeps it quiet. Having a show on FN seems like a "loss leader" for the network as the real rewards come from a share in the profits from sales of cookbooks, crappy cookware and gadgets, etc. Not to mention advertising.

Trisha is a competent home cook and that's about it. I wasn't expecting her to have the skills of a Le Cordon Bleu or CIA graduate. She has a name and following and that will attract viewers, thus advertisers, so it was a good match for FN. It's the same thing with Pioneer Woman, although Trisha's experience as an entertainer gives her a huge advantage in the watch-ability arena.

I finally saw a recipe today that I'm interested in trying, which was the almond shortbread. That seems like it would make a nice holiday treat to give away. However, I first need to acquire an oven-proof skillet. Other than that, the meal was too heavy on pork products and sugar. I've used that almond/sunflower seed/ramen noodle combination in a fairly common recipe for broccoli slaw salad.

The clueless-in-the-kitchen guests need to get lost. That woman today was the worst. Seriously, she didn't know which END of a stalk of asparagus you cut off? She also had to have Trisha confirm that she was adding baby spinach to the salad. Also, Trisha, in the role of cooking instructor, was doing her friend a great disservice by insisting that she "eyeball" everything. What's the aversion to measuring? It was particularly obvious during the baking segment. Those dry ingredients weren't leveled off and when the friend was "sifting" stuff into the bowl and all over the counter she acted like she was terrified. Anyway, nothing like ruining a novice cook's budding confidence when they get brave enough to try to bake something and it fails miserably because they didn't measure the ingredients properly.
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#146

Xingu

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 9:30 PM

I also agree that I don't think Trisha is in this for money. It seems like almost everybody on FN has some other more lucrative "day job," like owning restaurants, catering, food writer, etc.

All food-related entities. When Paula Dean puts out a country album I'll be equally critical.

Maybe she does indeed make charitable donations from her FN earnings, but keeps it quiet. Having a show on FN seems like a "loss leader" for the network as the real rewards come from a share in the profits from sales of cookbooks, crappy cookware and gadgets, etc. Not to mention advertising.


If so, why be quiet about it? Who, in their right mind, would go on The View, promote the cookbooks, give one to each audience member and not mention that the proceeds went to charity? It would only increase sales and offer more support to the charity. No publisher or PR person would ever allow this. How can a show that makes money from advertising be a "loss leader"?

That woman today was the worst. Seriously, she didn't know which END of a stalk of asparagus you cut off?


Yet these are the people she chooses to put on a cooking show. But when the host doesn't even know which end of the lemon to put in the squeezer, what can one expect from the teacher.

Also, Trisha, in the role of cooking instructor, was doing her friend a great disservice by insisting that she "eyeball" everything. What's the aversion to measuring?


I don't see it as an aversion, I see it as incompetence. Measuring is critical in baking. But since Trisha has no training in cooking/baking she doesn't know better. Yet she feels qualified to put on a cooking show. I'm thinking of taking up brain surgery. How hard can that be? You just cut open the skull and take out the nasty bits.

I consider her cooking skills and recipes right up there with Sandra Lee. Only Trish is much, much more likeable.

But other than that I don't see much difference between the two:

* Untrained cooks? Check.
* Seasoning packets? Check.
* Canned soups? Check.
* Cross-contamination? Check.
* Clueless friends in the kitchen? Check.
* Bastardized recipes available elsewhere? Check.
* Pre-packaged foods when fresh would be cheaper? Check.
* Tablescapes? Nope, Sandy's got Trish beat on this one.

Edited by Xingu, Nov 17, 2012 @ 10:27 PM.

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#147

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 10:58 PM

I find Trisha pleasant to watch, unlike PW who is nails on a chalkboard to me. As someone else said, she is a competent home cook. As far as what she does/doesn't donate to charity, many people keep their charitable activities/giving private. Not every celebrity brags about what they give, & just because Trisha isn't talking about it on her show doesn't mean she isn't involved in charitable giving.

The Thanksgiving ep disappointed me. The turkey had me grabbing at my stomach while I was thinking of the bacteria that must grow on it as it sat without heat for 7 hours. No thank you. Bland cornbread stuffing with hard boiled eggs- WTF was that? I would throw up if I ate stuffing w/ hard boiled eggs in it. I deleted the ep from my DVR before I'd even finshed watching it.
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#148

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Posted Nov 17, 2012 @ 11:43 PM

Wasn't the clueless woman today just making dinner for her husband and maybe their kids? Why the hell would she have needed to make a 20 pound ham?
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#149

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Posted Nov 18, 2012 @ 8:58 AM

Watching to repeat of yesterday's ep. The ham looks delicious, but yeah, it's ginormous. She baked it in the same covered roaster she made the turkey in, & I'm coveting it now.

I am a shortbread freak, so I want to try the almond shortbread recipe. I make a spinach strawberry salad that is ridiculously easy (baby spinach, sliced strawberries, slivered almonds, topped w/ a poppy seed dressing), & Trisha's addition of ramen noodles doesn't entice me to try her recipe. I hate them & they are waaaaay to Aunt Sandyish for me.

We make asparagus bundles, but we wrap them in prosciutto sprinkled w/ parmesan.

It's amazing to me how much better Trisha's show is than PW's. There is a similar level of home cooking skill, but Trisha is light years more pleasant to watch. And listen to- PW's voice is beyond annoying.
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#150

mushypeas

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Posted Nov 18, 2012 @ 10:22 AM

If so, why be quiet about it? Who, in their right mind, would go on The View, promote the cookbooks, give one to each audience member and not mention that the proceeds went to charity?


Because her mother raised her right?

She's a home cook. As is most of FN's lineup now. Not everyone needs to go to cooking school to be qualified for a show. They don't need wicked knife skills. And they will occasionally do something stupid that isn't edited out. As an engineer, I don't react too strongly to putting a lemon in upside down in the citrus squeezer. It will still extract juice.

She's entertaining. One of the worst cooks in the world is one of my favorite hosts - Sandra Lee. There has never been a more entertaining cooking show than Semi-Homemade. She's a comic genius. Not everyone watches to learn how to cook - I already know how.
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