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Trisha's Southern Kitchen


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#31

grisgris

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Posted Apr 21, 2012 @ 4:30 PM

I don't feel that it's Trisha personally, that people are taking exception to, but the premise of the show in general. I might be speaking in the minority, and from my personal opinion, but many of us don't want to see yet another "scripted lifestyle" program or duplication of food genre. FN already has a successful long-running show that features Southern/down-home/comfort food prepared by a female native of Georgia. Why is there the need for another one?

In addition to Paula, there are/were "Cooking for Real," "Down Home with the Neelys," and most recently, "Pioneer Woman," that all featured more or less the same type of food. YMMV, but I'd like to see ONE such themed show that featured somebody who was very accomplished in that style of cooking and the other four program slots could be filled by something different.

I think that Trisha is good in front of the camera, but I expected that because she's experienced decades of success as a nationally-acclaimed recording artist and live performer. I'd really like to see her show with just her for the half hour. I think she has the camera presence, personality and cooking skills that she doesn't need to be propped up by guests and backstories.
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#32

hoosier

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Posted Apr 21, 2012 @ 5:10 PM

Trisha is a bright spot in the sea of dismal cooking stuff on TFN. She really gives a fresh take to cooking show fodder.
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#33

mushypeas

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 10:25 AM

Trisha is a bright spot in the sea of dismal cooking stuff on TFN.


I agree. As personalities go, she's a winner. And I've pretty much given up on being inspired to cook based on watching a Food Network show. I watch it now for entertainment, and watching someone cook is way more entertaining to me than watching some bimbo with way too much plastic surgery duking it out with her "friends" at a dinner party (a la the Repulsive Housewives franchise and its ilk). She's certainly a very competent cook, from what I've seen so far.

Today's show, foodwise, seemed to hit every southern food stereotype - fried chicken with milk gravy, mac & cheese, and pecan pie. Looked predictably good and really heavy. <yawn>

I've never made mac & cheese in a slow cooker - she did have some written note pop up about doing it in a pan in the oven if desired. The recipe reminded me of my southern grandmother's, which was not bechamel based and used egg to bind. Her recipe had an admittedly obscene amount of cheese, which I'm sure tastes good. (I'm totally with her in loving cheese more than chocolate and had to laugh at that remark.)

I'll keep watching for the personality and lifestyle aspects of the show. I like her.
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#34

Mlle Poilane

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 10:41 AM

I wonder who is doing the programming at the FN now that Bob has been sent upstairs. Whoever it is, he/she must love southern cooking because we're sure seeing a lot of it these days. So far, Trisha doesn't seem to be breaking any new ground based on her recipes. They all seem to be her mother's, and they're mostly the standard southern fare -- fried chicken, mac and cheese, cream gravy, etc. If you're going to enjoy this show, you'd better like silly jokes because the show is full of them. I like Tricia alright, but I haven't been excited over the first two episodes.
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#35

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 11:13 AM

I find Trisha pleasant & personable. She is light years more pleasant to watch than Pioneer Woman, & since they seem to be cooking the same food, I'll definitely vote for Trisha to stay & PW to get the boot (although I understand PW is now shooting season 3 of her series. Damn it.)

Here's my beef- well, 2 beefs. #1- How many southern cooks/cooking shows, demonstrating A LOT of the same recipes, do we need on FN? There is the Neeleys, PW, Pauler & Jaime, & now Trisha. Their food is very similar, & they don't vary their recipes, either (how about showing how to lighten them up, or take a southern recipe & make an Asian or Mexican version). Fried chicken is on my list of top 5 favorite things to eat, & Trisha's chicken looked great, but I don't need to see another show on how to make fried chicken. Or mashed potatoes, one of the most basic things a cook can make.

Beef #2- Unlike some other posters, I'm not willing to give up my desire to watch FN to see cooking shows that demonstrate actual cooking, serving, & planning ideas that are based on REAL COOKING. There are still some shows- though becoming fewer & fewer- like Ina, Anne, Marcella, Giada- hell, I'll throw in the supremely annoying Guy Feddie because he does make a variety of real food & I usually learn something during his show- that are what I consider real cooking shows. But the drek that FN has been adding to the schedule in the past few years- PW, this show, anything from a NFNS winner, & the queen of them all, Aunt Sandy- makes me yearn for the earliest years of FN, when it was truly all about the cooking. Trisha's show is yet another lifestyle- not cooking- show, & that's not why I watch FN.
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#36

arkansan

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 11:26 AM

I used to watch FN and HGTV all the time but have given up on both of them. We get the PBS Create channel on cable and it has by far the best cooking shows these days.
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#37

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 11:31 AM

I went over to the website to look at Trisha's recipes that have been posted so far. To me, they are just good "normal" food. I do not like recipes that are so complicated and that have ingrediants that are diffcult to find. Her food sounds delicious. I need to check to see if this show is On Demand.
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#38

vera charles

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 12:59 PM

I used to watch FN and HGTV all the time but have given up on both of them. We get the PBS Create channel on cable and it has by far the best cooking shows these days.

I will second that. If you want to see some actual cooking, you have to go to PBS.

I don't have any interest in watching someone cook things I already know how to make and probably make better than they do, anyway. Since I make what FN terms "southern cooking" or "comfort food" all the time, I think it's pretty boring to watch it on TV. And I'm seriously not a fan of Trisha Yearwood.

Edited by vera charles, Apr 22, 2012 @ 5:02 PM.

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#39

PaminBB

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 1:53 PM

I think Trisha is fine as a host, but have a serious question - is this type of food really daily home fare in the south? This northerner was under the impression that these were more special occasion dishes (ok, not the mashed potatoes, but the the other stuff). I believe that Trisha even mentioned that she only fried chicken for this one friend, but people seem to think this is "normal" food. I have never fried chicken, and have no desire to, so maybe I'm the odd one out.
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#40

CPP83

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 1:59 PM

is this type of food really daily home fare in the south?


It all varies depending on where you live, or what you like. But this food is considered, by most, to be basic comfort food, not special occasion fare, so you may find some homes that cook such meals maybe three, four times a week, sometimes more, especially the deeper South you venture.
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#41

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 2:16 PM

For some folks, fried chicken is certainly not special occasion food. Growing up, we had it all the time. I don't fry it myself much any more due to the mess it creates, but do love having it at dinner at church once a week. Same goes for macaroni and cheese, that is just a normal side dish.
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#42

grisgris

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 4:49 PM

Wow! It sounds like the terms "down home," "comfort food," "Southern" and "special occasion" have very broad interpretations and it's really interesting to hear everybody weigh in. This might be more fun to talk about in the "Has Food Network Gone Downhill Thread." I'm going to go visit over there.

I'll quickly say that from the Midwestern perspective, at least in my family, meatloaf, homemade macaroni and cheese (I can't remember ever having that, it was always Kraft from the blue box), and home fried chicken, were infrequently served. My mother occasionally prepared meatloaf for my father, but it was an awful recipe from a 1950's "BH&G" cookbook. The rest of us could take it or leave it. I think she made fried chicken and cream gravy in an electric skillet a few times. My mom (rest her soul) was a SAHM mother of four, and while she was a good cook, I don't think that she liked to cook from scratch that much. As soon as convenience (semi-ho) foods, KFC (and other chicken joints) became popular in the 60's/70's, she was on cloud nine.

My take, thus far, on Trisha's show has been that she's prepared food both times for special occasions. I would consider the adoption of a new baby and the annual visit from my friend who lives across the country, as special occasions. Trisha, being a good (and as Aunt Drunky would say, "thoughtful") hostess, prepared menu items that either the guest of honor specifically requested, or that Trisha knew/thought they'd enjoy.
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#43

wallybear

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 5:00 PM

but have a serious question - is this type of food really daily home fare in the south?

This is an excellent question. I'm from Jersey & I, too, wonder if what is shown on Trisha's show, as well as PW & the rest of the onslaught of southern food based shows FN airs, is typical of the regular, normal diet of most southerners? And also, not to be a dunderhead, but do southerners like variety- by that I mean, do they embrace the foods of other nationalities & make them their own? Trisha said she only makes the fried chicken when her friend comes once a year or so. I'd love to see what she REALLY cooks then- does she feed her family a diet laden in butter, fat, & sugar, or does they eat a more healthy variety & cook Mexican, Asian, Italian, etc. foods? IMO a show about what she really cooks for her family, w/ some old family faves like the chicken, pecan pie, etc. thrown in here & there, would be more interesting.
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#44

vera charles

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 5:04 PM

I guess when I say "all the time", I actually mean "once in a while" or maybe just "I know how to make it". No one I know eats fried chicken or macaroni and cheese or mashed potatoes every day. Most people eat a lot healthier than that.

grisgris mentions an electric skillet to fry chicken. My mom had one of those, too. She grew up on a farm, so we had lots of country food growing up. As an adult, I eat considerably less of it.
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#45

smiley13

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 5:35 PM

Yes, while I can't speak for all people in all Southern states, the Southerners I know prepare and eat all sorts of foods. And no most meals are are not all heavy foods, we eat lots of fresh vegetables too. And lots of seafood.

With only a six episode run, I am not sure how much variety she will be able to show though.

Edited by smiley13, Apr 22, 2012 @ 5:39 PM.

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#46

mushypeas

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 10:01 AM

She killed me with the "diamonds don't belong in biscuit dough" comment!
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#47

vera charles

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 11:07 AM

Once again, I only caught a moment of the show as I was flipping through the channels. The cake with all that gloppy sauce poured over looked really gross. I looked at the chicken and dumplings recipe online last night. Did she really make it with just chicken, salt and pepper, water, and flour? That would be some seriously bland chicken and dumplings. FN's website contains more than 100 recipes for chicken and dumplings and they all have vegetables, herbs, buttermilk, mushrooms, various seasonings, something to add some flavor. Any of them would probably taste better than chicken, salt and pepper, water, and flour.
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#48

mushypeas

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 6:07 PM

Did she really make it with just chicken, salt and pepper, water, and flour? That would be some seriously bland chicken and dumplings.


Yes, that's what she did. I'm a little curious about the texture of the dumplings only containing flour and water (I guess hers are more of a noodle than a biscuit). But with respect to the blandness, with really great chicken and dumplings the broth is the star. If it's really wonderful and flavorful, I don't need a bunch of herbs to gild the lily. But I do like peas in chicken and dumplings, for both color and flavor.

I'll admit that I'm totally intrigued by the cake and plan to try it.

And, I continue to love her personality. I'm not learning how to cook, but I'm not looking for that. She's lovely, and her guests are very likable.
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#49

grisgris

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 6:46 PM

The deviled eggs were nothing special. I think that everybody who makes deviled eggs uses his or her own spin to make them. I did like Trisha's tips about how to use days that were a few days old and to turn them over the night before you hard-boil them. I make hard-boiled eggs quite a bit to have as snacks, so I'm eager to try that out.

I'll have to admit that since I don't like coconut at all, that the cake didn't appeal to me. (The concept of using graham cracker crumbs in lieu of flour though, was intriguing.)

I don't know what it is about this particular show, but I find the guests terribly distracting. I saw Trisha drop a whole chicken into a pot with water, then while she was talking about making the dumpling dough, the niece was skimming the congealed fat off of the top of the broth. Did Trisha explain what she did with the chicken. (I mean logic prevails that she obviously pulled all of the meat off of the bones and added them back to the broth.) How long did she cook the chicken?

I completely missed the making of the cake glaze. (OK, I glanced at the paper once or twice during the commercials and didn't put it down quickly enough.) I just saw the sister stirring away and Trisha wrapping dumpling dough over her niece's fingers and wrists for her to dump in the pot of boiling broth. (That all seemed to be a little silly, but they WERE reminiscing about their family.) I actually thought that the niece had better ideas, like using a pastry blender and pizza cutter to make dumpling dough.

I've only made chicken and dumplings one or two times. I like peas and carrots in mine. I cheerfully admit that I'm not into making bread or any type of dough, so it's Reames frozen dumplings for me. I probably would have put a few simple aromatics in with the chicken, like onion, celery, carrot and maybe a bay leaf along (OK, and then probably some thyme) with the s/p to flavor the broth. I also like a slightly thicker broth/sauce. I made chicken and dumplings once for my elderly downstairs neighbors (they've both long since passed away.) The wife had just gotten home from the hospital and was on a completely BLAND diet. I used no seasoning whatsoever. They thought it was one of the best meals they'd ever eaten and asked me if I was "from the South." After watching today's show, I will look back and take that as a compliment!

I do get tired of hearing TV cooks yammer on and and on about "grandma's cooking." I imagine though, that it's probably a huge part of most people's lives and that's the source of many family traditions. After hearing endless tales about saintly, "Grandma Lorraine, Grandma Paul, Grandma Hires, Grandma Dicey, etc.," ad nauseum, it was hilarious to hear today about "Grandma Yearwood," with her chain-smoking and hot pink lipstick prints that she left on the cigarette butts.
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#50

wallybear

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 7:13 PM

She killed me with the "diamonds don't belong in biscuit dough" comment!

I loved that!! A shot directly across the bow at the greedy, ham-handed one.

Once again, I didn't find the recipes interesting, but I really do like Trisha. I know nothing about her as I detest country music, & I'm enjoying her warmth & genuinly likeable personality. She's funny, too. Oh- I did learn something- flipping the eggs over the night before you boil them to center the yolk- I never heard that before. Good tip. That one thing is more than I learned in 2 'seasons' of PW.
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#51

mushypeas

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 7:19 PM

Yes, the tip about flipping the egg was a new one to me. Makes sense, huh?
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#52

grisgris

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 10:56 PM

I bought eggs today, I'm going to try it in a few days. Never thought about the "physics of eggs!"

I like Trisha's personality and her dry sense of humor. It's not corny, OTT or loaded with sexual innuendos. I love her confidence to be herself before the camera.

Like mushypeassaid, I don't watch this show to learn new cooking techniques. Even though I don't like the way that the guests are handled, I LOVE the little tips Trisha gives. I have learned something new every week that she's been on.
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#53

vera charles

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 7:09 AM

If you try the yolk-centering thing, grisgris, please report back on the results. On first hearing it, I'd put it in the file with Aunt Sandy's tips about keeping pecans from sinking to the bottom of the pie or Melissa's magical regrowing scallions. In the folder labeled "Huh?"

If anybody wants a really good chicken and dumplings recipe, Tyler Florence's is awesome.
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#54

wallybear

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 8:32 AM

If you try the yolk-centering thing, grisgris, please report back on the results. On first hearing it, I'd put it in the file with Aunt Sandy's tips about keeping pecans from sinking to the bottom of the pie or Melissa's magical regrowing scallions. In the folder labeled "Huh?"

As she began that tip, I thought the same thing, but then she showed the hard boiled egg cut in half, & damned if she wasn't right. The egg look beautiful & much more stable than my eggs usually turn out.
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#55

betsyanne42

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 12:15 PM

First the bad about the show:

Do we constantly need reminding of whose recipes she is cooking, who she is married to, or who she is having on her cooking show. By now everyone should know who she is. She is driving me insane with all of the repeats.

Now the good:

I am really enjoying the recipes of her show. They are very simple and very easy to follow for the new cooks on the show. Explaining the techs about each are very helpful to the new cooks of america. You can take these recipes, and Claire's advice of BYOC, and enhance them into your own. I love that about recipes.

The only really gross thing so far of the shows is the coconut cake. Agree about the gloppiness, and it appeared to be a pancake poundcake, instead of one that rises higher.
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#56

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 2:36 PM

I learned about centering egg yolks awhile ago, on some website explaining how to hardboil eggs in a crockpot. Since then, I've seen Shirley Corriher recommend putting the eggs on their sides overnight to center the yolks for devilled eggs -- I haven't tried it yet, but she generally seems to know what she's talking about, so I expect it works.
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#57

GridironGoddess

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Posted May 3, 2012 @ 5:49 PM

What I dislike about the show is what most of you dislike - the "Grandma this and that", the "guest" appearances aren't working for me; just too much giggling that makes for not enough cooking. Her niece seemed very uncomfrtable and really added zero to the episode. Being from the South myself, I got the chicken and dumplings dish. That is the way it was cooked in the South, without all the add-on's like peas, carrots, or any other vegetables, etc. The dumplings that my grandmother makes puff up nicely like biscuits and add a thickness to the dish that needs no other additions. The broth thickens from the flour in the biscuit dough. We gobbled it up like nobody's business. I do believe so much of the regional recipes hinge on what you ate growing up and how accustomed to it you became, and still love. I've thumbed through Trisha's two cookbooks and they have some delicious recipes. I just don't want her to turn into Paula Deen (no disrespect to those Paula fans).
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#58

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Posted May 6, 2012 @ 7:43 PM

I enjoyed the family reunion show. For me the show is mostly appealing because of the guests she brings on. Her relationships seem very warm and friendly.

The grilled chicken looked good. Some of her desserts are different and have a definite "70s" feel to them (particularly the cake with lime jello added). I wouldn't want to try that one, because of the jello, but I love that she shares family recipes.
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#59

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Posted May 7, 2012 @ 10:31 AM

I like Trisha and she is a total natural on camera, but I'm getting tired of her guests. She does appear to have the most natural interaction with her guests than any other FN host, but I would like to see her have an episode by herself. I don't mind guests at the end of the show eating and talking and whatnot, just not in the kitchen while she's cooking.

Those grilled onions looked sooo good! One of our friends frequently grills onions by coring them, throwing in some butter, and wrapping in foil, but I'll have to tell him about the addition of bacon... Onions and bacon - yum!
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#60

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Posted May 7, 2012 @ 2:07 PM

grilled onions looked sooo good! One of our friends frequently grills onions by coring them, throwing in some butter, and wrapping in foil, but I'll have to tell him about the addition of bacon... Onions and bacon - yum


Toss in a beef boullion cube along with the butter and bacon!!
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