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Titanic in 3D


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#31

Chicken Wing

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Posted Apr 9, 2012 @ 1:33 PM

the whole 'King of the World' moment.


I was actually shocked that everyone in the theater didn't bust out laughing at that part, since it's become such an iconic "stupid moment" in film. I admit I was trying hard not to smile; it is quite ridiculous.

#32

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Posted Apr 9, 2012 @ 5:30 PM

I have never watched any movie in 3D, but this was the first time I was eager to go to the theater and watch this particular movie in 3D.

I never saw it when it was released in the theater and regretted it ever since. I am glad it was re-released. This is the kind of movie that should be seen in a theater.

#33

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Posted Apr 9, 2012 @ 5:55 PM

I always thought there were similarities between Titanic and Cameron's other movie The Terminator, in which they both have a love story where the guy dies, but the woman becomes stronger afterwards because of him.

#34

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 6:45 AM

Best audience response line ever: "When the ship docks, I'm getting off with you" (audience) "You just did!"

That was brilliant.



the whole 'King of the World' moment.

I was actually shocked that everyone in the theater didn't bust out laughing at that part, since it's become such an iconic "stupid moment" in film. I admit I was trying hard not to smile; it is quite ridiculous.

What Cameron was trying to do with that moment - and I know it didn't work for everyone but it did for me - was to convey the "top of the world" feeling of being on that ship, of being on Titanic. Of how someone like Jack could stand at the brow of the ship and feel great, just being on the greatest ship in the world, sailing full speed to America. The idea was to convey that sense of "feyness" delirious happiness before doom. And that uncanny, crazy joy is what will make the tragedy even more profound.

It didn't make me want to smile. It made me want to cry. But I am a self-confessed sap! If I was old enough to go to the theatre by myself when it came out, I'd probably have watched it a hundred times. I think it's a great movie, corny dialogue notwithstanding. Even more, I think it's a great feminist movie.

#35

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 8:54 AM

Oh, I do get what Cameron was trying to convey there, and it makes me smile, too. But the "I'm the king of the world" exclamation has since gone down in (recent) history as one of the silliest lines ever uttered in a movie -- undeservedly so, perhaps, but it has incessantly been made fun of in the past 15 years.

#36

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 11:32 AM

I think it's a great movie, corny dialogue notwithstanding. Even more, I think it's a great feminist movie.

I think so, too. Back then, women didn't make choices for themselves, but that's exactly what Rose does. Sure, old Rose says that Jack "saved" her at the end of the movie, but in reality, she saved herself. Jack just showed her that there was another life she could live if she really wanted it. He's like and Edwardian Jim Halpert.

#37

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 12:19 PM

Speaking as a man, and being in my late teens watching the movie, I was looking at the Jack Dawson character thinking "I want to be that guy!" I wanted to be that confident and cool and adventurous. I think Cameron wanted to be that guy too.

Edited by Limbonaut, Apr 11, 2012 @ 12:20 PM.


#38

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 1:26 PM

I think it's a great movie, corny dialogue notwithstanding. Even more, I think it's a great feminist movie.


Although the "I'd rather be his whore than your wife!" is a little messed up from a certain context.

But yes, Rose does save herself. Jack just gave her the guts to do it.

#39

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 3:23 PM

Oh, I love that line. It's not the best choice of words, but I love her attitude...and the fact that she hawks one in his face. Great movie moment.

#40

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 10:45 PM

Seeing the production budget (18 million according to boxofficemojo) meaning that turning the movie in 3D was cheaper than making any movie, even an indy currently. I can imagine that all studios are going to play the "Let's re-release in 3D" game with every single movie that made a couple of bucks back in the day... God help us all.

#41

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 10:51 PM

I'm pretty meh on 3D usually. I think most of the time it's unnecessary but fine. The only time it really bothers me is really fast action scenes, because whether it's my eye or the actual film, I can't ever focus on anything. But I wanted to see Titanic on the big screen again, and I was fine with the 3D even if I would have been more fine with it in 2D.

I will say, however, that the scenes where I actually did appreciate the 3D were the shots of the wreckage. See, for me, 3D works best when things recede into the background rather than popping out at you, making the screen feel deeper. And that's fine, but as I said mostly unnecessary, because even if we've never been in a totally opulent state room and an 800 ft ocean liner, it's close enough to our every day reality of what the 3D space of a room is that we can make it 3D in our heads no problem. Most of us aren't going to ever see the wreckage of an 80 yr old ship (at the time of filming) miles and miles under the surface of the sea. That extra little depth and dimension for that part stood out to me. For some reason the shot of the boot lying in the silt gave me goosebumps all over.

But then, I've always been completely fascinated by the Titanic wreckage. I was watching the old Titanica documentary on Netflix the other night, and a they guys on the submersibles were arguing about messing with things in the debris field and the voice over guy took the opportunity to spell out the controversy over whether artifacts from Titanic should be preserved or if it's a grave that should be left undisturbed. Count me in the preservation camp. Maybe it makes me a horribly insensitive person, but I would pay big money to pick things up from the debris field and study them.


Anyway, this movie has a lot of well known and discussed flaws, but I still love it. Despite it's weaknesses (there is a good reason none of its Oscar nominations were for writing) it's still very moving. And I don't mean Rose and Jack. Well, OK, I like Rose and Jack, I think they're sweet, but mostly it's everything else. It's the whole story and the way they were able to capture the scale of the disaster and the loss of life. Two scenes never fail to make me cry hard. The Nearer My God To Thee sequence, and when the water bursts the glass dome and is then seen ripping the ship apart elsewhere.

#42

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 3:27 PM

I'm in the crowd that was too young to see the movie in theaters the first time around, so I was really excited to see it on the big screen (the 3D was just a bonus - the scene where the water bursts through the glass dome in the main stairwell gave me chills in three dimensions).

Yes, there are some corny parts of the dialogue, but, overall, I loved it. Leo and Kate really have a believable chemistry. The scene where she is getting lowered in the boat and she's looking back at him, with the flares in the background - it was such a beautiful shot and moment between the two of them.


The time really passed by for me - it might have been that I was having a leisurely day and had no other occupations about things to do and such, but the movie didn't feel like the 3+ hours that it is.

#43

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 10:15 AM

Oh, I love that line. It's not the best choice of words, but I love her attitude...and the fact that she hawks one in his face. Great movie moment.


I remember seeing the movie the first time around and all of us in the audience were cheering when Rose spit in Cal's face.

#44

regardez

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 4:02 PM

Where is the thread for the mini series? Can't find it. I'm liking it a lot better than the movie version

#45

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 5:25 PM

Best audience response line ever: "When the ship docks, I'm getting off with you" (audience) "You just did!"

That was brilliant.


LOL!

I saw this movie a shitload of times when it came out and though I couldn't care less about the 3-D, I went to see it again last week.

It is funny though, that particular line made me realize something when I saw it last week. When she says she is going to get off with Jack, the ship was still a few days away from New York. What was Rose going to do during that time?. She had made her decision to go with Jack, so staying with Cal and her mother didn't seem feasible. Was she going to stay with Jack in his steerage cabin, alongside Fabrizio and the two Swedes? Of course the iceberg rendered the situation moot, but I am curious as to what she was going to do. That would have been an awkward couple of days.


Edited by reggiejax, Apr 15, 2012 @ 5:26 PM.


#46

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 7:35 PM

I always assumed Rose was planning on bunking with Jack in his cabin. They had already slept together at that point, and she was past what anyone else thought.

It would have been CROWDED, though.

Edited by Rdnzl, Apr 15, 2012 @ 7:36 PM.


#47

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 7:38 PM

She had made her decision to go with Jack, so staying with Cal and her mother didn't seem feasible.

It would be awkward, sure, but she'd been doing it the rest of the trip.

#48

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 11:37 AM

My favorite part of the movie is when Ruth is whining about how boats should be seated according to class, and Rose finally snaps: "Oh Mother, SHUT UP!" And later, when Ruth is urging her to get into the boat with her, Rose just tells her goodbye.

It's kind of cold to let your mother think that you died on the Titanic, but then again, so is pimping out your daughter to a jerk for financial security. So I guess Rose did the right thing.

#49

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 1:21 PM

It's kind of cold to let your mother think that you died on the Titanic, but then again, so is pimping out your daughter to a jerk for financial security. So I guess Rose did the right thing.

It was financial security for Rose, too, and actually much more so than her mother who would be dependent on how much Rose and her new husband felt the need to give her. And that in no way compares to letting your mother believe that you are dead forever. She definitely did not do the right thing. She should have let her mother know at some point (after she was safely married to someone else if she were worried).

#50

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 2:40 PM

It was cruel, but I hated how Ruth layed the whole guilt trip on Rose about how their future was set squarely on Rose's shoulders and how they'd be ruined if she didn't marry Cal. I know how it was for women in 1912, but Ruth could have gotten a job, couldn't she? I don't think she cared so much about being secure, she wanted to be RICH, first class, all or nothing.

But yeah, even though she though she deserved to lose Rose, that way was extreme.

#51

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 2:42 PM

She should have let her mother know at some point (after she was safely married to someone else if she were worried).


I always wondered if Cal/her mom knew that she was alive. She was an actress, after all. Maybe she refused contact, but they must have at least known of her existence.

#52

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 6:01 PM

I went to see this on Sunday with my family. The 3D was cool and all (the coolest 3D effect for me was when Cal's shooting at Jack and Rose and the spray of water comes up towards the camera) but mostly I had forgotten how HUGE everything is.

During the original release, I was totally one of those squealing teenage fangirls that went to go see it multiple times. I had Titanic posters and magazines and books and my own little version of the Heart of the Ocean necklace (which I was actually going to wear to the movie on Sunday but forgot). I've seen it upwards of 40 times (sadly, that's not an exaggeration; I lost count--YEARS ago--somewhere in the high 20s and I know I've seen it at least ten times since then), but the scale of it all kinda gets lost on a small TV screen.

And even though I'm well beyond "squealing teenage fangirl" age, I will always think the kiss on the bow is the most beautiful thing ever. I love the way they're playing with each other's hands. (It's totally my favorite part. Shh.)

#53

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 6:04 PM

I always wondered if Cal/her mom knew that she was alive. She was an actress, after all. Maybe she refused contact, but they must have at least known of her existence.

If Rose had been a stage actress, she could have gone unnoticed by her mother and Cal. She could have flown under the radar as a movie actress, too, since a lot of actors/actresses back then were not known by name. Ruth and Cal didn't seem like the movie-going types, anyway; they both seemed a little too 19th century to be interested in movies, at least in my opinion.

I know how it was for women in 1912, but Ruth could have gotten a job, couldn't she? I don't think she cared so much about being secure, she wanted to be RICH, first class, all or nothing.

As big a bitch as Ruth was, I *kind of* understood where she was coming from. Ruth was a middle-aged woman living in 1912 and didn't have any useful work skills that we know of; she would have been LUCKY to become a seamstress. This was a time when there wasn't much of a middle ground between rich and poor- and if you were poor, you had nothing- so if I were Ruth I would want to stay rich, too.

Of course, that doesn't excuse her from pressuring her daughter to marry an asshole she didn't love, but that's another post for another day.

Edited by Rdnzl, Apr 17, 2012 @ 6:05 PM.


#54

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 6:58 PM

I always assumed Rose was planning on bunking with Jack in his cabin. They had already slept together at that point, and she was past what anyone else thought.

It would have been CROWDED, though.


It would be awkward, sure, but she'd been doing it the rest of the trip.


I think it would've been a cold day in hell before Cal would've let this happen. Considering how violent (his meltdown at breakfast after Rose spent the night dancing in steridge) and vindictive (him setting Jack up as a thief) he could be, there is no way he would've allowed Rose to spend the rest of the trip with Jack, then get off the boat with him when they docked. He (and her mother) would've been completely mortified and felt disrepected by this behavior and thus would've corrected it immediately. Jack being a third class citizen and Rose a first class citizen, a woman, and Cal's fiancee, wouldn't have had any choice but to comply. I honestly thought they were being very naive about getting off the boat together - perhaps it was the afterglow of the sex.

Furthermore, I'd even argue that had Jack been able to join Rose on the door, and they both survived that Rose's life would've turned out very different. It was easy for her to hide from Cal when he came looking for her on the California because it was just her. However, if Jack had survived and been with her I don't know if she'd been so lucky to stay hidden from Cal. Moreover, even if she had, would their "love" been strong enough to survive the struggles of a life together beyond Titanic? Jack was dirt poor and was a free spirit. Would he have been content with settling down and taking care of Rose? Would she have been content with living a life in poverty? Up until that point, she'd been used to living a very affluent lifestyle, and though she did survive the Titanic by living a life that wasn't affluent like the one she'd led before, I think her being able to live such a life (I'm assuming with minimal complaints) was heavily inspired by her need to honor Jack's memory - what he'd done for her. Had he lived and they had to struggle together I don't know if she would've been as successful or even if her and Jack would've remained together.

Edited by Enero, Apr 17, 2012 @ 7:01 PM.


#55

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 8:24 PM

I honestly thought they were being very naive about getting off the boat together - perhaps it was the afterglow of the sex.

She probably would have snuck off. They couldn't watch her at every moment.

However, if Jack had survived and been with her I don't know if she'd been so lucky to stay hidden from Cal.

If she could hide then he could hide as well.

Would she have been content with living a life in poverty?

She wouldn't have had a choice unless she wanted to go back and marry Cal. Although yeah, she might have been a bit unpleasant at times as she adjusted.

#56

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 10:52 PM

At the risk of being labelled the least romantic person on the whole TWOP: they actually fit in the door! http://lolsnaps.com/news/21594/0/

#57

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Posted Apr 18, 2012 @ 8:15 AM

I don't think they were planning on doing much sleeping... *winks* But more seriously, that could have been easily managed. They could have worked out a rotation with Fabrizio or even swapped bunks with him. Of course, Cal would probably try to have Jack arrested or something for seducing Rose. I won't be surprised to hear that that may have been an actual crime in the 1920s.

#58

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Posted Apr 18, 2012 @ 8:44 AM

they actually fit in the door!


Haha! Although, I'm not so sure it was the room that was the problem, but the weight. If the bloggers were sitting on a floating piece of wood that size, I'd give it to them.

#59

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Posted Apr 18, 2012 @ 5:42 PM

I always assumed Rose was planning on bunking with Jack in his cabin. They had already slept together at that point, and she was past what anyone else thought.

It would have been CROWDED, though.




It would be awkward, sure, but she'd been doing it the rest of the trip.




I think it would've been a cold day in hell before Cal would've let this happen. Considering how violent (his meltdown at breakfast after Rose spent the night dancing in steridge) and vindictive (him setting Jack up as a thief) he could be, there is no way he would've allowed Rose to spend the rest of the trip with Jack, then get off the boat with him when they docked. He (and her mother) would've been completely mortified and felt disrepected by this behavior and thus would've corrected it immediately. Jack being a third class citizen and Rose a first class citizen, a woman, and Cal's fiancee, wouldn't have had any choice but to comply. I honestly thought they were being very naive about getting off the boat together - perhaps it was the afterglow of the sex.


This is along the lines of what I was thinking when I first posited the question of how Rose planned to spend the remaining two or three days on the ship. She got away from Lovejoy and Cal that night, but I cannot imagine she would have been able to keep that up for the remainder of the trip. I agree, no way in hell does Cal allow it. Which to modern ears sounds quaint, but we are talking about the norms and mores of the Philadelphia upper-class society of 1912, to which Rose belonged.

Cal certainly would not have stood by, and Rose would have to be an idiot to think he would. But I'll grant that she was not thinking clearly after becoming intimate with Jack in the cargo hold, which was the style at the time.

Not to mention that I think the White Star line would have a serious problem with this entire little melodrama occuring on the ships maiden voyage, or the 86th voyage for that matter. I cannot imagine they would have allowed Rose to stay in Jack's cabin under any circumstances.

Edited by reggiejax, Apr 18, 2012 @ 5:43 PM.


#60

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Posted Apr 18, 2012 @ 6:57 PM

They could have worked out a rotation with Fabrizio or even swapped bunks with him. Of course, Cal would probably try to have Jack arrested or something for seducing Rose. I won't be surprised to hear that that may have been an actual crime in the 1920s.


I'm voting for Molly Brown. I think she would have let Jack and Rose hide out/bunk with her.