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The Hunger Games


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#301

glitter5579

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Posted Apr 10, 2012 @ 11:22 AM

Watched the film a second time and I liked it a lot more once I was able to disconnect if from my expectations of what I pictured in the book.

I appreciated Jennifer Lawrence's performance much more the second time around. I found her a bit too guarded and short (not height, attitude) the first time, but upon second viewing she really did capture Katniss. Since Katniss is the narrator of the book, it's easy to forget how internal she is and how little she speaks of her feelings out loud and I think Lawrence did a good job of playing just bellow the surface. One of my favorite moments was when she and Peeta go hunting and he jokes about the bow, the reaction she gives is just so spot on, like it's the first time that Katniss has ever noticed a boy flirting with her.

I found Peeta a little too whiny and not quite self deprecating. I admit, when I read the books, I always picture Peeta as Pacey Witter circa season 3. All woe is me, why is there always a soulmate in my way, hopeless romantic who invests too into his relationships. But most importantly a charismatic talker who uses humor to get people to like him. I think Hutcherson has the ability to portray that and there were hints of it, but in general it didn't quite translate (the "feel free to kiss me anytime" line that got cut would have been a good example). Another thing that really bugged me was the scene where Katniss tells Peeta to throw the weights to impress the Careers went against everything about the Katniss and Peeta dynamic. Peeta was always the character that knew how to work a room, so him needing advice from Katniss rang false.

As for Haymitch, I thought he was too competent and subdued. I guess when I heard WH was in the role I assumed he'd be like his character in Zombieland all belligerent and crazy and stuff. I still enjoyed the character, but would have liked it if he were just a bit more sarcastic and drunk.

I liked Liam Hemsworth and Gale much more than I thought I would, although I always preferred Gale to Peeta in the first book. Him and Lawrence had an easy chemistry that worked well to set up the Gale/Katniss relationship in the brief scenes they had and I think they did a good job setting up Gale and his ideals that don't really come into focus until Mockingjay.

My biggest pet peeve though was how rushed and boring the end was. By the end of the games, the kids barely had but a few scratches on their faces and are basically all "Well that was weird. So, watcha up to this weekend?" I hope they let the last two films go a bit darker because by the end of the trilogy Katniss and Peeta are just so fucked up from all the things they went through, it was jarring in this film that they seem to be really nonchalant about the whole thing.

Edited by glitter5579, Apr 10, 2012 @ 11:46 AM.


#302

Kabota

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 12:51 PM

Its weird, because often when seeing a movie, I don't always enjoy the experience the first time around. I come out thinking, well, that was 2 hours I'm never getting back, but after talking it over with friends, remembering high points, funny lines, etc., I realize that it really wasn't that bad. In fact, I may rent it in the future and actually love it. With HG, it was a weirdly opposite experience. I left the theater thinking that the movie was great, touching, suspenseful, but the more I thought and talked about it, the less I liked it! It must just be a natural function of my familiarity and love for the books. It took my third viewing to make peace with that!

I think it's a fine adaptation and an interesting, engrossing movie. Many of the problems I have with it are the same ones that have been repeatedly mentioned in this thread, like limited characterization, minimal survival hardship in the arena, etc. The same goes for the strengths, such as the cast.

I found Peeta a little too whiny and not quite self deprecating. I admit, when I read the books, I always picture Peeta as Pacey Witter circa season 3. All woe is me, why is there always a soulmate in my way, hopeless romantic who invests too into his relationships. But most importantly a charismatic talker who uses humor to get people to like him. I think Hutcherson has the ability to portray that and there were hints of it, but in general it didn't quite translate (the "feel free to kiss me anytime" line that got cut would have been a good example). Another thing that really bugged me was the scene where Katniss tells Peeta to throw the weights to impress the Careers went against everything about the Katniss and Peeta dynamic. Peeta was always the character that knew how to work a room, so him needing advice from Katniss rang false.


This is probably the main thing that still bothers me, mostly because it has impact going forward. I don't know if it was in effort to solidify Katniss as the strong, female hero to root for right from the start, but I felt that they really unbalanced their relationship in her favor. In the book, they seemed more like equals, just with different strengths, but by omitting many of Peeta's wise and humorous lines, they subdued and flattened the character. In the book, Peeta makes fun of Haymitch and Effie. In the cave, he tries to make Katniss feel better about her inability to help him when he's near death. We really see very little of his levity in the movie, which is an important counterpoint to Katniss's seriousness. Don't even get me started about the bread scene and his having to apologize for it! Also, in their "rooftop" conversation, Katniss already seems to get what Peeta's trying to put into words about not giving in to the Capitol. In the book, it takes Rue's death to really make her understand. In the movie, I just felt Katniss started off a little too fully formed, making her emotional, psychological journey a little less impactful. This is just a problem I have with the script, though, not the actors. I thought both Lawrence and Hutcherson were perfectly cast and capable of even more.


When he finds out in the book it's so heart breaking to the point that you just wanted to shake him and say "Oh Peeta, you blind idiot! Can't you see she doesn't love you?" I don't know why they would save it for the next film, or if the "We try to forget" was supposed to be it.


From a storytelling standpoint, it's really not a good idea to end by opening up a new conflict (especially if they wanted the film to stand well on its own). It wasn't even a good idea to do that in the book, in my opinion. Then again, I feel like one of the only people who thought, "please don't make them have a long conversation about how it was all fake right now" at the end of the movie, and sighed with relief when they didn't.


I know a lot of people didn't like the way this went down, but this was one point that didn't bother me. I actually thought the "we try to forget" conversation conveyed the "it was all for the games" idea pretty well, although with some wiggle room. She sounds pretty unemotional and dismissive (which is, itself, likely a coping mechanism) and he sounds/looks fairly resentful and hurt. After her obviously put on performance in the final interview and, by contrast, his fairly dialed down one, I actually figured he was pretty clear about her intentions in the arena.

Edited by Kabota, Apr 11, 2012 @ 12:54 PM.


#303

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 1:09 PM

I know a lot of people didn't like the way this went down, but this was one point that didn't bother me. I actually thought the "we try to forget" conversation conveyed the "it was all for the games" idea pretty well, although with some wiggle room. She sounds pretty unemotional and dismissive (which is, itself, likely a coping mechanism) and he sounds/looks fairly resentful and hurt. After her obviously put on performance in the final interview and, by contrast, his fairly dialed down one, I actually figured he was pretty clear about her intentions in the arena.


Here's my problem though, yes I thought her intial comment illustrated that it was all for the games but then his response opened up the possibility that they could continue having a relationship anyway. And then in the film there is nothing more to the scene so it can be viewed with an open-endedness, like maybe Katniss is tacitly implying that she agrees with Peeta. In the book there is no doubt that Katniss feels trapped with this relationship thats being forced on her and in the movie you can interpret their relationship as something that both may be open too. I didn't view Josh's reading as resentful and hurt. Granted I've only seen the scene once but from my recollection there was a bitter sweetness to it.

Edited by MV007, Apr 11, 2012 @ 1:11 PM.


#304

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 1:50 PM

Here's my problem though, yes I thought her intial comment illustrated that it was all for the games but then his response opened up the possibility that they could continue having a relationship anyway. And then in the film there is nothing more to the scene so it can be viewed with an open-endedness, like maybe Katniss is tacitly implying that she agrees with Peeta. In the book there is no doubt that Katniss feels trapped with this relationship thats being forced on her and in the movie you can interpret their relationship as something that both may be open too. I didn't view Josh's reading as resentful and hurt. Granted I've only seen the scene once but from my recollection there was a bitter sweetness to it.


It's certainly open to interpretation, as we don't actually see her reaction to his words. Resentful may be too harsh of a word, but he certainly seems guarded, so the fact that he looks down afterwards leads me to believe he didn't get much encouragement from her. It's also possible that I'm letting my book knowledge inform the scene!

#305

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 2:07 PM

I haven't read the books, but I took the "what do we do now? "we forget" "i don't want to forget" in a much more existential and moralistic context, not a romantic one. I thought Peeta was asking how do they move on from something so horrific, and Katniss responded "we try to forget," meaning to try to forget the entire experience and move forward. Her own coping mechanism of having to live with not only what she went through, but what she had to do to survive. And his response "I don't want to forget," in a "never forget" type of way. He never wants to forget everything that happened - part survival's guilt, part remembering how horrific it was so they don't become too complacent, apathetic, or supportive to the Hunger Games.

That's what I would prefer them to be talking about, anyway. It's what would separate this series from something like Twilight. While there were romantic elements, I took the satiristic, dystopian future as much more serious element and social commentary. After such a traumatic and life altering experience, I would hope the characters would be thinking about something more important than "omgz, we totally kissed in the cave, what do we do now?!"

#306

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 2:38 PM

I haven't read the books, but I took the "what do we do now? "we forget" "i don't want to forget" in a much more existential and moralistic context, not a romantic one. I thought Peeta was asking how do they move on from something so horrific, and Katniss responded "we try to forget," meaning to try to forget the entire experience and move forward. Her own coping mechanism of having to live with not only what she went through, but what she had to do to survive. And his response "I don't want to forget," in a "never forget" type of way. He never wants to forget everything that happened - part survival's guilt, part remembering how horrific it was so they don't become too complacent, apathetic, or supportive to the Hunger Games.


Yea, this makes sense now that I think about it. Maybe I too was using my book knowledge too much as well. Katniss's inner dialogoue is as much about her "romance" with Peeta and her trying to reconcile what she just went through. Whereas in the movie the "romance" aspect took a definite back seat.

#307

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 2:47 PM

I haven't read the books, but I took the "what do we do now? "we forget" "i don't want to forget" in a much more existential and moralistic context, not a romantic one.

I took it as both. Peeta was asking "what now?" in relation to the 2 of them, Katniss thought he meant"what do we do now that we've won and we're going home and everything?" Katniss wanted to move on, forget she lived through that, go back to her mom, Prim, Gale, same as usual. But Peeta wanted to remain connected to her, romantically AND in regards to what they went through together.

#308

glitter5579

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 3:06 PM

I agree with you to an extent OptimisticCynic, I think Katniss was thinking from a strictly game playing POV. Majority of her actions throughout the entire series are motivated by survival and romance is generally the last thing on her mind. So now that she's survived the games, she wants to forget all the horrors and return to her family. With Peeta though, majority, if not all of his actions are based around Katniss and his love for her (it's what makes his character kind of boring at times), so I have a hard time interpreting the scene any other way, especially when it was juxtaposed with Katniss seeing Gale again and looking guilty.

#309

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 3:06 PM

I took it as both. Peeta was asking "what now?" in relation to the 2 of them, Katniss thought he meant"what do we do now that we've won and we're going home and everything?" Katniss wanted to move on, forget she lived through that, go back to her mom, Prim, Gale, same as usual. But Peeta wanted to remain connected to her, romantically AND in regards to what they went through together.


I absolutely think there are layers of meaning here which makes it a very interesting scene...short, few words, but rather a lot conveyed.

And his response "I don't want to forget," in a "never forget" type of way. He never wants to forget everything that happened - part survival's guilt, part remembering how horrific it was so they don't become too complacent, apathetic, or supportive to the Hunger Games.


With Peeta though, majority, if not all of his actions are based around Katniss and his love for her (it's what makes his character kind of boring at times), so I have a hard time interpreting the scene any other way, especially when it was juxtaposed with Katniss seeing Gale again and looking guilty.


I think it's entirely reasonable and in character to assume he is speaking on both levels. We know that in CF,
Spoiler
So, I think he has a moral center that is not always tied up in Katniss, and this harkens back to his "rooftop" speech. I wonder if it's too much to read the not forgetting part
Spoiler

Edited by Kabota, Apr 11, 2012 @ 3:27 PM.


#310

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 4:48 PM

It's certainly open to interpretation, as we don't actually see her reaction to his words. Resentful may be too harsh of a word, but he certainly seems guarded, so the fact that he looks down afterwards leads me to believe he didn't get much encouragement from her. It's also possible that I'm letting my book knowledge inform the scene!

In reading the book, I thought that Katniss' feelings for Peeta did evolve in the Arena, with a bit of a very PG romantic awakening in Katniss, who had closed herself off of that, told herself she never wanted to have children and risk losing them to starvation or the games. And it's pretty easy as a 10, 11, 12 year old to be adamant you don't want kids. It's a different story when hormones hit, and I think book Katniss sort of found out that she wasn't really as uninterested in guys and love and all of that as she had thought.

A lot of the post-Games stuff in the book made it clear that Katniss did have some sort of feelings for Peeta, and she wanted to get back home to sort through them. But when she's told by Haymitch that she has to continue "the act" of being in love with Peeta after the games, it sort of killed any independent, genuine feelings she developed.

In thinking about how the movie handled the post-Games material, it may have been better to end the movie when Peeta and Katniss are announced the winners, and have the cliffhanger be whether Peeta survives his injuries (which were pretty superficial in the movie). Rushing through all the the post-Games stuff was rather anti-climatic, and, most of it, besides Haymitch's warning to Katniss, could have been handled more effectively in some sort of flashback montage, or interspersed flashbacks, at the beginning of the second movie. And the announcement of the winners when I saw it played for laughs, and while I get that it is funny, how the Capitol caves, it also just sort of undercut the emotional heft of the end of the Games. Excising all the scenes of medical treatment, Katniss' concern for Peeta's life, etc. also did that.

I respect that TPTB don't want these movies to be viewed like "another Twilight," but I don't think they need to redact all sentiment or romance from the movies to try to differentiate the two. The HG books are not centered on the trials and tribulations of Katniss' love-life, as written -- they tell a pretty straightforward coming-of-age story. I haven't finished the rest of the series, and frankly don't know whether Katniss ends up with Peeta, with Gale, or with Buttercup (nor does it really matter to me). But I feel scrubbing out any complexity and maturation of Katniss' feelings toward her male friends doesn't serve the coming-of-age story well.

Edited by annlaw78, Apr 11, 2012 @ 11:51 PM.


#311

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 2:28 AM

One thing that cracked me up was President Snow narrating that video at the Reaping, if only because Donald Sutherland does so much commercial voiceover work (especially in Canada). I saw an ad for a new golf course in Nova Scotia and heard President Snow's voice, which was pretty hilarious.

I assumed he'd be like his character in Zombieland all belligerent and crazy and stuff

Yeah, I was initially skeptical about Woody Harrelson's casting until I remembered how much I enjoyed him as Tallahassee in Zombieland. The writers did allude to him sobering up, though; I did notice a bit where he's at a dinner at the Capitol and wordlessly declines a refill of his glass.

I appreciated Jennifer Lawrence's performance much more the second time around.

What I loved about Lawrence's performance is that even though she generally played Katniss as stoic/guarded, when Katniss did have a strong reaction, boy did she make it count: her blind panic and terror after she's shut into the tube/elevator, or her horror and despair after Rue's death.

Edited by Blue32, Apr 12, 2012 @ 2:33 AM.


#312

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 4:35 AM

I think they did a good job setting up Gale and his ideals that don't really come into focus until Mockingjay.


I think it's going to be very interesting to see how Liam Hemsworth handles Gale going forward. The Gale in the first book is just beginning to flesh out who he becomes in Mockingjay, and I hated him in this movie (I'm seeing it again tomorrow, so maybe I'll change my mind) and it's a very intense character development, so I hope he's up to the task. And he really has to work on his American accent.

I found Peeta a little too whiny and not quite self deprecating.


See, this is interesting to me (and maybe I'm a little biased; Peeta is my favorite character) because I kind of felt like Katniss was the one who was kind of whiney, but I also think that's because it's a first person narrative. Peeta would probably be Bella Swan-like if it were the other way around, lol. I think Peeta is a very selfless character, and in some ways, more mature and intelligent than Katniss. I think the other makes up for what the other lacks.

And speaking of Peeta, I watched some youtube videos of Josh Hutcherson interviews, and he is just the nicest, most down-to-earth, humble, polite, intelligent man I think I've ever seen in the Hollywood scene. He's got a good head on his shoulders and I hope he does big things. Talk about a kid that was raised right. True class act. Jennifer Lawrence is funny and quirky, as well. It's always so nice when you have a cast that are not only great actors, but good people, too.

#313

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 6:27 AM

One thing that cracked me up was President Snow narrating that video at the Reaping, if only because Donald Sutherland does so much commercial voiceover work (especially in Canada). I saw an ad for a new golf course in Nova Scotia and heard President Snow's voice, which was pretty hilarious.

I was thinking the same thing. He did the voice overs for the Vancouver Olympics and that video is a lot like something you would see for Olympics.

#314

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 7:33 AM

I respect that TPTB don't want these movies to be viewed like "another Twilight," but I don't think they need to redact all sentiment or romance from the movies to try to differentiate the two. The HG books are not centered on the trials and tribulations of Katniss' love-life, as written -- they tell a pretty straightforward coming-of-age story. I haven't finished the rest of the series, and frankly don't know whether Katniss ends up with Peeta, with Gale, or with Buttercup (nor does it really matter to me). But I feel scrubbing out any complexity and maturation of Katniss' feelings toward her male friends doesn't serve the coming-of-age story well.


I agree. Katniss is mature and very adult in many ways at the start of the story, but emotionally, she is just sixteen.

It will be important to find the right balance between the political, action and love/romantic aspects of the story, especially going forward. I think the "love story" is more about forging connection, letting oneself be vulnerable and open to other human beings in a world that objectifies human life and promotes survival of the fittest.  It's not so much about how many times Katniss kisses Peeta or Gale, but about whether she is willing to open herself to the possibility of caring for someone so much that she's willing to risk the pain of possibly losing him.  Katniss knows the pain of losing her father. She saw what that did to her mother. As the series starts, the only person she allows herself to love fully is Prim.  She sees death all around her as the trilogy progresses.

Panem is a brutal place where love, compassion and self-sacrifice can result in pain and death. The relationships in the story define the difference between surviving or existing and, actually, living. Without love, there is no humanity.....the characters may just as well be animals, then. The "love story" informs Katniss's arc across the series, as she struggles to maintain her humanity in the face of all the horrors. 

The triangle aspect is actually pretty metaphorical and ultimately in Mockingjay speaks to
Spoiler
. It's an important aspect of the books and, if adapted well, should function within the interwoven themes and plot lines without taking over.

Edited by Kabota, Apr 12, 2012 @ 8:41 AM.


#315

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 9:03 AM

What I loved about Lawrence's performance is that even though she generally played Katniss as stoic/guarded, when Katniss did have a strong reaction, boy did she make it count: her blind panic and terror after she's shut into the tube/elevator, or her horror and despair after Rue's death.

I can sense her saying in her mind how much she hates the Capital for making her go through this.

#316

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 11:43 PM

I found Peeta a little too whiny and not quite self deprecating. I admit, when I read the books, I always picture Peeta as Pacey Witter circa season 3. All woe is me, why is there always a soulmate in my way, hopeless romantic who invests too into his relationships. But most importantly a charismatic talker who uses humor to get people to like him. I think Hutcherson has the ability to portray that and there were hints of it, but in general it didn't quite translate (the "feel free to kiss me anytime" line that got cut would have been a good example). Another thing that really bugged me was the scene where Katniss tells Peeta to throw the weights to impress the Careers went against everything about the Katniss and Peeta dynamic. Peeta was always the character that knew how to work a room, so him needing advice from Katniss rang false.


I enjoyed Peeta in the movie and yet, I felt he was less fleshed out than the Peeta in the first book. Josh Hutcherson did a really good job with what he was given but what to do when the character's best lines are cut. I picture Peeta as a Hufflepuff/Slytherin mix and outside of the interview - which was so perfectly Peeta - I don't think they expounded on the character's ability to read people and play them. I also think they went overboard on the lovestruck aspect of his character. From what I remember, Peeta only had an long-enduring crush. He even mentioned he noticed other girls. But in the movie, he was watching her walk home everyday. LOL. I love the character and I cringed at that line. I read the character as falling in love forreal with Katniss during the Games and in the movie, it seemed like he was in love with her before that and I don't know. My issues are really script issues but it does change the character and it changes his dynamic with Katniss (to be fair, Katniss is more emotionally open in the movie as well). I enjoyed movie!Peeta and Katniss however.

Oh, also, I wish "You here to finish me off, sweetheart?" or "If only the arena was a giant cake" were included because it was Peeta's self-deprecating humor that endeared me to him. Oh, I do take issue with Peeta's leg remaining intact. It felt awfully ableist for TPTB to take a character in the book who's meant to be disabled and is mentioned as having a limp and then having him keep his leg in the movie.

JLaw was amazing.She was not the Katniss I pictured (POC Katniss what) but she made me really love the movie Katniss. I got literal chills during her emotional scene with her mother and with Rue. The emotional impact of Rue's demise was not strong for me in the movie whereas it was the only death I sobbed over in the book series.

Liam Hemsworth is not who I pictured as Gale but he did what he was meant to do. I have no definite opinions on Gale's portrayal yet. I was apathetic towards Gale in the book so hopefully movie!Gale can change that. We shall see when we get to CF or MJ when the character gets more play.

I mean, I have my quibbles on the slight variations in character and story but overall, I enjoyed the movie as its own entity.

Catching Fire is my favorite in the series so hopefully, I can pleased with that one as well. Oh, and Zoe Saldana for Johanna Mason. Please and thank you.

Edited by dogstar85, Apr 13, 2012 @ 11:50 PM.


#317

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 12:12 AM

It felt awfully ableist for TPTB to take a character in the book who's meant to be disabled and is mentioned as having a limp and then having him keep his leg in the movie.

I highly doubt that their was any discriminatory intentions. They probably just didn't want to get that graphic or have to worry about a fake leg in the future movies.

#318

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 6:51 AM

Finally watched it last night. Really enjoyed it, and definitely one of the better recent book-to-movie adaptations I've seen in a long while. I loved Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss (she's such a good actress) and the rest of the casting was pretty top-notch as well. I particularly enjoyed Elisabeth Banks as Effie Trinket. The book was in a way a meta commentary on reality shows and PR relationships, and for obvious reason I feel as though that particular aspect of the story was highlighted on film.

On the same note, something that struck me (and that one of my friends pointed out as well) is that it never came across how much of it Katniss was faking with Peeta in the cave and how much of it was real. I don't know whether it was because of the acting or because of the way it was written. In the book it's much easier to follow Katniss's train of thought as everything happens from her POV.

#319

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 7:33 AM

I highly doubt that their was any discriminatory intentions. They probably just didn't want to get that graphic or have to worry about a fake leg in the future movies.

In the 2nd and 3rd books I don't even remember much, if any, reference to Peeta's prosthetic leg, so him not losing his leg in the movie didn't bother me too much. At the end of HG, it was part of the whole big reunion on the finale show and so much of that was already missing in the movie.

#320

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 9:29 AM

the Katniss I pictured (POC Katniss what)

The only big-name actress I can think of who fits Katniss' description in the book--short, petite, olive skin, dark hair, light eyes--is Mila Kunis, which...no, not in a million years, a million times no. On the other hand, JH and LH hadn't done much at JL's level before being cast as Peeta and Gale, respectively, so who knows? I'm kind of surprised they made JL's a rich brown colour and not black myself, because it's one dye job versus another.

If JL had made a hash of the role, then I could see her looks being an objection, but she killed it (no pun intended). It does grind my gears that there's all this fuss over Katniss supposedly not looking starved enough, when Gale's built like a well-nourished football player and nobody says jack squat about him. Not cool.

Edited by Blue32, Apr 14, 2012 @ 9:33 AM.


#321

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 11:49 AM

It does grind my gears that there's all this fuss over Katniss supposedly not looking starved enough, when Gale's built like a well-nourished football player and nobody says jack squat about him.

Gale was in the movie for five minutes or so.

#322

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 3:03 PM

Liam Hemsworth said in an interview that when he got the part, his brother sent him a text saying, "It's the Hunger Games, not the Eating Games."

#323

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Posted Apr 19, 2012 @ 7:13 PM

The only big-name actress I can think of who fits Katniss' description in the book--short, petite, olive skin, dark hair, light eyes--is Mila Kunis, which...no, not in a million years, a million times no. On the other hand, JH and LH hadn't done much at JL's level before being cast as Peeta and Gale, respectively, so who knows? I'm kind of surprised they made JL's a rich brown colour and not black myself, because it's one dye job versus another.

If JL had made a hash of the role, then I could see her looks being an objection, but she killed it (no pun intended). It does grind my gears that there's all this fuss over Katniss supposedly not looking starved enough, when Gale's built like a well-nourished football player and nobody says jack squat about him. Not cool.


I really enjoyed JLaw in the part but I won't get over the fact that they took a white girl and clearly bronzed/tanned her up rather than even entertain the possibility of Katniss being played by a non-white girl.

My issue is more with the casting people who specifically asked for Caucasian actors for Katniss (and Gale for that matter) rather than open up the process for POC/mixed/Hispanic/Native actresses and then choosing the best possible actress for the role. Also, I don't think of Mila Kunis, who is Ukranian IIRC, as a person of color.

It's disappointing that the default color is always white even when the character is racially ambiguous (Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights being played by white dudes for years springs to mind). I think I even read that the director said that Katniss was supposed to be biracial and SC referenced ethnic mixing as well. Regardless, they precluded any non-white actresses from auditioning for the part. Excellent essay I read on racebending.com (http://xalexiel.blog...n-of-color.html)

Edited by dogstar85, Apr 19, 2012 @ 7:39 PM.


#324

Emily Thrace

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Posted Apr 20, 2012 @ 1:03 PM

It's disappointing that the default color is always white even when the character is racially ambiguous (Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights being played by white dudes for years springs to mind). I think I even read that the director said that Katniss was supposed to be biracial and SC referenced ethnic mixing as well. Regardless, they precluded any non-white actresses from auditioning for the part. Excellent essay I read on racebending.com (http://xalexiel.blog...n-of-color.html)



I hate to say this but I don't really see how Katniss is anything other than white. She's supposed to be from Appalachia which is very white now and I highly doubt it getting more isolated would change that. A couple people have mentioned that District 12 sounds like a classic case of founder effect, which means they probably are all descended from a small group of people. The fact that almost everyone has blue/grey eyes makes it highly unlikely that thier ancestry is anything other than European and in fact is probably Irish/British/Scots/Welsh since that's where that trait is most common. Some Native American ancestry might be there its pretty common in that region and would account for the olive skin(Although thats not unheard of in Ireland/Britan either) but it would be a fairly small percentage. Of course that would require the author knows her genetics which given the amount of basic research fail in the books I wouldn't hold my breath on that.

I do agree that casting policies generally suck and are unfair to POC but I don't think they've fucked up in the specific case. I was actually pleased with the overall diversity amongst the cast it was a decent mix still a little too white but if all of Paneam has some level of founder effect it would make sense.

#325

Sakura12

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Posted Apr 20, 2012 @ 2:48 PM

Katniss' mother and sister are blonde haired and blue eyed. Katniss and Prim have the same parents so if Prim is white so is Katniss. Dark hair and olive skin is not an indicator of different ethnicity. Many Europeans have dark hair and olive skin and they are still considered Caucasian.

#326

braggtastic

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Posted Apr 21, 2012 @ 12:17 PM

Maybe Katniss' father was black in the author's thinking, or maybe he was bi-racial. I don't think there was any talk of grandparents in any of the books. I think I assumed that life was so rough at this point in time that the average lifespan had dramatically decreased.

#327

murrrrr

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Posted Apr 21, 2012 @ 4:03 PM

What's the big deal about two siblings from the same parents having different colouring. Both my parents are white, from Irish, Scottish descent. I take after my mother's side with light hair, eyes and complexion. My younger sister takes after my dad's side with dark eyes and medium complexion. She tans very darkly. At best, I can muster a light tan. My three older sisters have dark hair. One has light eyes and the other two have dark eyes. Katniss is described as having gray eyes. Very few non-whites have gray or blue eyes. Vanessa Williams is the exception.

#328

Vega01

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Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 6:54 AM

Also, I don't think of Mila Kunis, who is Ukranian IIRC, as a person of color.

The book says Katniss had olive skin and grey eyes.

According to wikipedia:

Olive skin describes a skin color range of some indigenous individuals who are from the Mediterranean and some other parts of Europe, Horn of Africa, Middle East and regions of South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia.

[...]

fair skin can have an olive hue, and some olive-skinned people may burn easily in the sun if they are also fair


http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Olive_skin

I think Mila Kunis fits that despcription. Although I agree she does not fit Katniss.


I pictured Katniss simmilar looking to a Mexican actress called Ana Claudia Talancon while I was reading the books. If her and Gael García Bernal were younger and American, I feel like those two could have played Gale and Katniss, especially when they used to look like in this scene.

But meh, that's just looks. After seeing the film I just can't think of anybody else but Jennifer Lawrence in the role. I can't think of anybody else that can enbody the strenght and fierceness of Katniss with those little cracks of vulnerability that Lawrence imprints the role.

Edited by Vega01, Apr 22, 2012 @ 7:50 AM.


#329

Sakura12

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Posted Apr 23, 2012 @ 9:46 AM

When reading the book everyone will see someone different as the character. So I never get to hung up on who they get to play the character in the movie as long as the actor can pull off playing said character. Jennifer Lawrence did that perfectly, so that's all that matters to me.

#330

Haberdasher

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 4:05 PM

When reading the book everyone will see someone different as the character. So I never get to hung up on who they get to play the character in the movie as long as the actor can pull off playing said character. Jennifer Lawrence did that perfectly, so that's all that matters to me.

Agreed. Plus, Suzanne Collins herself approved of the casting, which should have removed a lot of doubt (not that I had any. I thought the casting was perfect).