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7-18: "Karma" 2012.02.27


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#61

mbd

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Posted Mar 1, 2012 @ 3:01 PM

The ending, with Ted leaving Marshall and Lily the old apartment, was sweet, but also confusing. I can understand Ted wanting to get out of that apartment, because it's so comfortable and familiar that I can see how he might feel that he's using it as a security blanket of sorts. And true, he knew that Marshall and Lily were miserable out in the suburbs. But did he really know that they wanted their old apartment back? I remember back in Season 1 that Lily didn't want to live there because it was a "boys' apartment", that she basically wanted a new place for her and Marshall to start their married life/family together. On the other hand, I think it was a great idea for the show to have Marshall and Lily move in there, because I think it'll be easier and more realistic for them to hang out at MacLaren's occasionally or for the gang to hang out with them if they're right upstairs with the baby, rather than in the suburbs or even a different part of the city.


I see what you mean. But Marshall and Lily have the opportunity to turn the apartment down. It seems like Ted moved out to shake things up a bit in his life, not because he thought they needed/wanted it more. They might sell the house, or let Lily's dad take it, and forget about it completely ... or they may hang onto it as a fallback option. Maybe they will keep it as a weekend/summer place, or maybe they'll rent it out to someone and be landlords. They very well might end up deciding that they don't want the apartment.

I don't think Season 1-era Lily ever wanted a suburban house. She seemed really happy in the city. Marshall, if anyone, was the one who wanted a white picket fence. She disliked being a married couple living with a roommate, not the apartment itself. Now the apartment is completely bare and she can set it up however she wishes, since it's only for her, Marshall and the baby.

I totally agree that moving M&L back to the city will give them more opportunities to hang out at the bar. The two of them schlepping a newborn out from Long Island wouldn't ring true to what most real life parents would do, and it'd be really crappy of either of them to say, "You take care of the baby, I'm taking a 46-minute train ride to go to a bar and spend time with my friends." That's at least three of four hours out of the house, and that's assuming they only have one or two quick beers - and who would take that long trip just for one or two quick beers? It's more realistic of them to bring the baby to the bar/restaurant downstairs to grab a hamburger for dinner, or for Marshall to say to Lily, "I'm just going to run downstairs and have a quick beer with Ted, then I'll stay with the baby while you do something to relax."

#62

TheNewb

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Posted Mar 2, 2012 @ 6:29 PM

I am happy to see that the apartment will remain in the show but this does detract from the earlier episodes of Lily and Marshall adjusting to the house. Remember when the ended the episode with Ted recounting how home was where ever they all were together? This just feels like the show is being too responsive to viewer feedback or even the studio....

Well, we know the next episode is gonna have to touch base with Robin and Ted's conversation that made him want to leave. I'm all for big changes in the series but don't be sloppy when it doesn't work.

#63

Astor

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Posted Mar 3, 2012 @ 10:13 AM

This just feels like the show is being too responsive to viewer feedback

I kind of got that feeling too, but it feels kind of like they're only doing it because they remembered this was a TV show with a planned end game, not a sleeping pill.

Like a student who goofed off all semester and then pulled an all nighter for their final project. Yeah, at the end it's 'too much, too fast' but only because they had completely neglected to address it until then and let the work pile on.

#64

SuitUp84

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Posted Mar 3, 2012 @ 3:54 PM

"Karma" was, without a doubt, the worst episode of the entire series, as far as I'm concerned. Very little of the episode made any sense.

My biggest gripe: Marshall has been portrayed as a "suburbs guy" for the entire series, even as recently as this season. I get that he misses is friends, but now,it of the blue, he's a city guy?

And why are they moving again? They just moved into their new FREE house a few episodes ago, and now they're going to sink more money, time and effort into moving back to the city, with Lily on the verge of popping out a baby, and when they've spent the entire series complaining about how they're always strapped for cash? Moving on a whim comes off as being completely stupid.

As somebody mentioned, Robin, Barney, and Lily all work in the city. So why were they stuck in the suburbs for days? There's an entire angle about commuting that could have been worked in, which would have come across so much better than the whole "everybody and everything in the suburbs blows" thing because people who live in the suburbs can actually relate to getting up early only to wind up stuck in traffic or cramped on a train. In fact, they could have incorporated the whole "Drunk Train" idea into the commuting angle instead of doing a whole episode on it.

Speaking of Robin, she has become so irrelevant that they might as well write her out. Ship her back to Russia to cover stories for a while.

I have no problem with Barney trying to settle down, because it's inevitable. But who the hell is Quinn? I've seen every episode of the series and don't remember her at all.

And Ted? I wouldn't care if he jumps off of one of his beloved skyscrapers in the next episode. Ted has degenerated into such a whiny little flip-flopping bitch since the start of the Zoey/Arcadian storyline that it's difficult to care what happens to him anymore. This is a character who has done some stupid, cheesy things, but he always gave you a reason to root for him (come on, he "rode the tricycle" before Barney). Those reasons just aren't there anymore.

This season has really gone downhill. Every season has had "themes," if you will, and this season's themes were supposed to be Lily's pregnancy and Barney settling down. Both have been done very haphazardly at this point. Everything seems poorly planned, poorly written and very impulsive. It's very uncharacteristic for a show that has been extremely witty and concise for so long.

#65

HappyBerry

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Posted Mar 5, 2012 @ 1:11 PM

But who the hell is Quinn? I've seen every episode of the series and don't remember her at all.

Quinn appeared in the recent episode as a girl Barney met at a bar while Ted was off chasing some other girl. Barney was intrigued by her because she saw through all his bullshit. At the end tag, it was revealed that she was surprised Barney didn't recognize her, since he is at the strip club so much.

I enjoyed this episode. I don't think it was the best of the season, but it is definitely much better than some of the awful episodes we've see this season. I'm holding out some hope that the forward progress the show seems to be showing will continue.

#66

scarlet revised

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Posted Mar 6, 2012 @ 4:34 AM

I think a big problem for the writers is the fact that Robin, Ted and Barney have become completely and utterly depressing. Robin's career was supposed to be part of her happiness and now it's seems pretty crappy and she always seems to never really have a home.

Ted is clearly depressed and in love with Robin for the gazillionth time and Barney is a caricature. The actors are aging and every time I watch, I think the characters must be really sad when they return home at night and I cant enjoy a sitcom if all the characters seem so dark.

I know it happens in life all the time, but it's really depressing that only Lily and Marshall are evolving, even on the career front.

#67

nanobabes

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Posted Mar 8, 2012 @ 7:50 PM

It feels like a different set of (shitty) writers who work on one episode each week, who have no background or notes from the previous writers, nor a real sense of who the characters are. Actually, let me revise that. They get no history, no direction of where the overarching plot is going, but they get maybe a post-it note saying "At some point, Barney picks between two women, doesn't matter who, make it work!" Or, "The Staten Island house set is getting expensive, get rid of it somehow". They use memorable symbols from the past, like the yellow umbrella, the blue french horn, and slap bet to maintain supposed "continuity", but the characters seem like they come from a completely different mold in each episode.

I don't know why Lily and Marshall are in a hurry to start their family life out in the suburbs. Actually, most people I know stay in their small rental for their first kid during the first few years. Why make two huge transitions at the same time? Why move away from where your closest friends and family are, when you might need their help the most? Why get a 4 bedroom house before you even know what it's like to have one child? And while a free house in the suburbs seems too good to be true, there's still plenty of other factors in deciding where you want to raise your kids, like the kind of school you want them to attend. And like someone else mentioned, it's much easier to maintain a social life when you can have everyone easily come to you. Venturing out for the parents is MUCH more of a project. And it's not like your infant or toddler is going to be deprived of much in the city. Babies aren't outdoor dogs. I can understand when they get older, when they start going to school and you might want to build long-term relationships in a community, or have your kids play outside by themselves with other neighborhood kids. (Do parents still let their kids go out and play unsupervised, as long as they come home before dark?)

I don't have kids, but I don't understand the reluctance of raising children in the city. I can understand if you're in a dangerous neighborhood, or a neighborhood that caters to young singles or a crazy nightlife, but otherwise, what's the problem?

#68

hnygrl808

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Posted Mar 12, 2012 @ 7:47 PM

Speaking of rewritng history...

You remember in Season 1 when Marshall and Ted had the sword fight to see who got the apartment when Lily moved in?

Lily said at that time that she DIDN'T WANT THE APARTMENT because it "smells like dude"

#69

romantic idiot

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Posted Mar 12, 2012 @ 10:25 PM

Well, Robin's been living in it for a while, maybe she got the dude smell out.

#70

mbd

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Posted Mar 13, 2012 @ 9:27 AM

Speaking of rewritng history...

You remember in Season 1 when Marshall and Ted had the sword fight to see who got the apartment when Lily moved in?

Lily said at that time that she DIDN'T WANT THE APARTMENT because it "smells like dude"


All of the guys' stuff was in the apartment at that point. When Ted moved out and handed the apartment off to Marshall and Lily, he also cleared everything out of the place except for the crappy crib he built.

The apartment is now completely up to Marshall and Lily to furnish and decorate, so it's truly their own place. It's not just Lily moving into Marshall's former bachelor pad. That may be what she meant ... she wanted a fresh start with her husband, not just to be tacked on as almost an afterthought to an already-established home and life.

#71

SydNC

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Posted Mar 15, 2012 @ 8:35 AM

The apartment is just as much a character on the show as the main cast is. They cannot get rid of it.

All of the characters are at a turning point, realizing their life isn't turning out the way they wanted or planned. Doesn't mean their lives are bad though. In the beginning, Ted would have married any girl who said yes. Robin wouldn't have married her soulmate if God himself came down and said "this is the guy for you". Barney wouldn't even speak to a girl after he's nailed her, saying it's like "changing the oil in a rent-a-car". Marshall would have had 100 kids if it was up to him. Lily though, I find is the character with the least amount of character evolvement, and is my least favorite character on the show.

#72

BasilBee

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Posted Mar 16, 2012 @ 1:07 PM

Since we know from a way back episode that the kids know Robin as "Aunt Robin" the entire Ted/Robin getting back together was pointless to me as a viewer (maybe not to Ted but it's still not interesting enough for me to care). As well, Marshall's "not yet" at the end was pointless as a viewer. Is Robin the mother? Not unless she's their Aunt/mother and I don't think this is that kind of show.

Barney has always been vulgar and sexist, but loyal to Ted and with a big heart hidden way, way down deep. But he was never stupid. I don't think he could be as successful in business if he was as dumb as the show is now portraying him. I like the character of Karma -- I wouldn't want to know her -- but she is interesting. I can see how she and Barney would work out, but then we're left again with Barney/Robin and the Love That Goes Unspoken. I don't quite buy Barney's speech about how he was over her -- so I can't buy that he is so blinded by love for Karma that he can't see that he's being taken. And what was the reason given? Because Karma was "amazing" in bed? Barney has slept with so very, very, many women, I just can't buy that. Barney used to be a very interesting character. Now, as someone said upthread, he is just a caricature -- his actions make no sense because there is no real motivation. Neal Patrick Harris should be applauded for taking it as far as he can and for attempting to give depth where there is none.

Edited by BasilBee, Mar 16, 2012 @ 1:08 PM.