Jump to content

8-12: "Chase" 2012.02.13


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.

27 replies to this topic

#1

TWoP Nikita

TWoP Nikita

    Fanatic

  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted Feb 12, 2012 @ 3:00 PM

From Zap2it:

As Chase treats Moira (Julie Mond), a cloistered nun who is on the verge of making life-altering vows, they form a connection that causes Moira to question her faith; Taub and House take part in a series of pranks.



#2

extracat

extracat

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Feb 13, 2012 @ 9:23 PM

I fully expected someone at some point to accuse Chase of turning into House, but I was hoping it was going to be Foreman just because Foreman has known the two of them the longest. I was disappointed that Chase was so scientific about matters of faith in the end. It would be nice for someone on the show to have a different perspective on faith than everyone else. The scene that made me a fan of the show was Chase praying over the dead baby in Forever so I miss that Chase. I was also disappointed that Chase didn't come up with the final diagnosis. He was doing that back in season 3 with some consistency so I miss that Chase too. I don't buy that at this stage Chase would have to go running to House for every answer. He's not an idiot, even if he was emotionally invested. I hope this will be a wake up call for him and that knowing that he could fall in love again will make him reassess his lifestyle. I really liked that House *didn't* want Chase to turn into him, that he wanted him to be happy rather than a miserable clone of himself. The look exchanged between House and Chase at the end was perfect. I also liked that House told him he didn't make a mistake. I enjoyed Taub and Park's little stories. I'll have to watch this one again. There was so much in it.

#3

lz1982

lz1982

    Fanatic

  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Quincy, MA

Posted Feb 13, 2012 @ 9:38 PM

Having always enjoyed the House/Chase relationship, I really liked this one. It strained credulity that Chase would have been allowed to operate--and perhaps that he would have recovered so quickly--but I got into the story enough to go with it. I'm glad that Chase isn't leaving the team with just a handful of episodes left.

Also, I burst out laughing when the janitor tackled Taub. And it was cute when Chase pretended to be uninterested in the pranks, but still hung back to see if Taub would get soaked by the water gun.

Edited by lz1982, Feb 13, 2012 @ 9:54 PM.


#4

Calrice

Calrice

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Feb 13, 2012 @ 9:43 PM

I was also disappointed that Chase didn't come up with the final diagnosis.

Except he did, extracat. Once he saw the symptoms he went to House & asked for House to confirm his diagnosis & then have the team administer steroids. Chase couldn't do it himself because he was off the case. I thought the episode was quite brilliant - my only disappointment was that I thought Chase's decision at the end came a bit abruptly, I'd have liked to see more of what happened once the nun left & before the resolution of Chase coming back to House's team.

I fully expected someone at some point to accuse Chase of turning into House, but I was hoping it was going to be Foreman just because Foreman has known the two of them the longest.

That would require Foreman to have a brain & some degree of awareness of what makes both Chase & House tick. One thing that this season has confirmed for me, & this episode to a significant degree is that Foreman is simply Cuddy 2.0, with the same lack of awareness, & the same hypocritical blind spots. Foreman's the guy who not only slept with his patient, he did it on an ongoing basis, put her deliberately at risk through manipulation of a clinical trial & then the only reason he didn't kill her was because House came to the rescue. Chase slept with a discharged ex-patient once & then he mostly saved himself, only some minor kicks in the pants from House required.

#5

extracat

extracat

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Feb 13, 2012 @ 9:44 PM

Another thing--I loved the scene with House and Chase limping down the hall together. It said so much and was funny at the same time.

The House/Chase relationship has always been my favorite part of the show. I wish there had been a few more scenes with House. I think they've made it quite clear that cares about Chase and that's satisfying.

Jesse was great tonight. It's really a shame that they wasted his talent for so many years by giving him about one minute of screentime a week in seasons 4 and 5 and the man ho storyline last year. Now that they've finally realized he's got the chops, the show is coming to an end. Boo.

Except he did, extracat. Once he saw the symptoms he went to House & asked for House to confirm his diagnosis & then have the team administer steroids. Chase couldn't do it himself because he was off the case.


I'll have to watch it again with that in mind. Thanks!

Edited by extracat, Feb 13, 2012 @ 9:46 PM.


#6

peggy06

peggy06

    Couch Potato

Posted Feb 13, 2012 @ 10:50 PM

I didn't like the episode very much; I thought it was one of the poorer religion-themed shows and managed to be both facile and hokey about a religious vocation. The main plot with Chase and the postulant was forced, both that he falls for her and that she has a "vision" that sends her back to the convent. The bit about the doctors all being scared was weird. I mean how long has Taub been working there, and nothing has ever happened to him? Also, maybe it's just that it's a lame duck show, but I can't tolerate stuff like House trying to attack Taub with water balloons and water guns any more. I don't care what kind of convoluted logic they apply to justify it, it still makes me roll my eyes.

The relationship between House and Chase has been one of the strengths of the show. The one saving grace of the ep (IMO) was the scene where House and Chase talk, where House tells him not to make House's own mistake. Where he reiterates that Chase didn't make a mistake, something bad happened. More of that House over the last 3 years and maybe they'd be coming back with another season.

One question: In last week's preview, there was a scene where House says, "I'd apologize, but you still haven't accepted the first one." I didn't see that moment tonight. Was it in the episode?

Edited by peggy06, Feb 13, 2012 @ 10:54 PM.


#7

Shanna Marie

Shanna Marie

    Stalker

  • Gender:Female

Posted Feb 13, 2012 @ 11:29 PM

One question: In last week's preview, there was a scene where House says, "I'd apologize, but you still haven't accepted the first one." I didn't see that moment tonight. Was it in the episode?


It was near the beginning, when House shows up at Chase's place at a very bad time.

While I liked a lot about the episode, and I love it when they let Jesse Spencer out of the dungeon for longer than one or two lines per episode, I, too, am a bit disappointed in what feels like a retcon about Chase's faith. While I'm not sure that he had a true vocation for the priesthood and it's been clear that he's struggled with his faith, it's always seemed like the core of his faith was genuine and that it was maybe even something that scared him, that he was running from. The way he talked about leaving seminary, it came across like he couldn't allow himself to believe that God really cared about someone like him.

Now it comes out that he only went into the seminary because the nuns and priests at Catholic school were the closest thing he had to a family, and then he got kicked out for sleeping with the groundskeeper's wife (ugh). He kind of wishes he could have faith, but when it comes down to it, he doesn't believe at all. That doesn't fit with the guy who smugly ticked up points for God on the whiteboard and then argued that all the things that came together to allow the patient to be saved counted as a miracle, the guy who was able to sit and pray with a patient in crisis, or the guy who earnestly prayed over the dead baby.

#8

peggy06

peggy06

    Couch Potato

Posted Feb 13, 2012 @ 11:31 PM

It was near the beginning, when House shows up at Chase's place at a very bad time.

Thanks. I missed the very beginning.

#9

m3dix

m3dix

    Just Tuned In

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 1:25 AM

So what did we learn about Chase that was new in this episode? In "Wilson," we learned that Wilson was a big ole sap to whom "will give the shirt off his back" also includes his liver. In "5 to 9" we learned that, along with several million viewers, even in "Houseville," people thought Cuddy was a bitch, albeit a limber one.

However, other than buffing up reeeeeaaallly nice since shagging Cameron a few years back (and therefore guaranteeing the odd guest appearance in my Fantasy Cortex), what did we learn about Chase? It was an okay episode over all, and I was happy to see the focus shift over to that character for a change. However, for me, something was missing.

#10

PaulAllanJones

PaulAllanJones

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 1:32 AM

The need House has to make sure that he's a one-off is pretty much what rescues him as a character. Unlike Foreman or Cuddy, House knows what's wrong with him and despite his refusal to believe that he can be saved from himself, wants very much to not have company being what he sees as an irredeemable mess.

#11

Chimel

Chimel

    Just Tuned In

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 2:04 AM

The great song at the end is Promise, by Ben Howard.
His only album so far will be released in April in the U.S.

#12

bellonaclub

bellonaclub

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 8:10 AM

Now it comes out that he only went into the seminary because the nuns and priests at Catholic school were the closest thing he had to a family, and then he got kicked out for sleeping with the groundskeeper's wife (ugh).


There was something about that line was said that made me wonder if he invented that bit. About the groundskeeper's wife, I mean. I dunno. Like he didn't want to open up about his real reasons for leaving, so he made up a flippant one in keeping with his image of a manslut.

He kind of wishes he could have faith, but when it comes down to it, he doesn't believe at all. That doesn't fit with the guy who smugly ticked up points for God on the whiteboard and then argued that all the things that came together to allow the patient to be saved counted as a miracle, the guy who was able to sit and pray with a patient in crisis, or the guy who earnestly prayed over the dead baby.


But *that* Chase has had a lot of things happen to him since then. To me, it's not inconsistant at all that Chase's faith has been wiped out--this is a man who has deliberately killed a patient and watched his marriage fall apart as a result of that, a marriage he fought to make happen. That kind of experience would test anyone's faith.

#13

mcjen

mcjen

    Video Archivist

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 9:10 AM

this is a man who has deliberately killed a patient and watched his marriage fall apart as a result of that, a marriage he fought to make happen.


I kind of expected Chase to blurt that out in one of his confrontations with House - that he'd killed a man, that a woman he thought loved him left him (on account of that murder), that he'd been shot. It IS a lot to go through, while seemingly keeping a lid on it, and only acting out by sleeping around. I thought House's reassurance that Chase hadn't done anything wrong ("You were just shot.") was a bit facile. Chase did in fact do something "wrong" (i.e. stupid) in bringing a scalpel into the room with a patient in danger of psychosis who wasn't under restraint.

I guess I would have all been a little more resonant for me if we'd learned Chase was actually interpreting his being shot as some sort of sign from God, vis-a-vis the murder of the dictator. Having it all brushed off left me a little unsatisfied.

Couple of gripes: I swear, if I have to listen to one more character come yell at House about how he's miserable and so he wants everyone else to be miserable...I'm gonna stick a scalpel in myself. Shut up, everybody. It's his world-view - it isn't all about you.

Also: is it just me, or is it an inevitable function of being in the 8th season, but does most of the backstory that's unveiled about characters (especially longstanding characters like Chase) feel like it's being shoe-horned in, or troweled-on? Nothing feels organic to me anymore.

#14

lz1982

lz1982

    Fanatic

  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Quincy, MA

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 9:29 AM

But *that* Chase has had a lot of things happen to him since then. To me, it's not inconsistant at all that Chase's faith has been wiped out--this is a man who has deliberately killed a patient and watched his marriage fall apart as a result of that, a marriage he fought to make happen. That kind of experience would test anyone's faith.


I agree. I can buy that Chase has lost his faith (even though it's kind of a drag that no one on this show can be genuinely religious or even spiritual). I do wish we'd seen more of his religious crisis in the last couple years, rather than just a lot of his sleeping around, so that it didn't seem so sudden now.

#15

090108joanna

090108joanna

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 10:43 AM

Of the three character-based episodes they've done, I still think "Wilson" is by far the best, but "Chase" had its moments. I thought it was interesting that the rest of the team all reacted to Chase being stabbed in different ways -- Taub taking self-defense training, Adams going to trauma counseling, and Park being afraid to treat patients -- but that Chase himself refused getting help. I didn't totally buy his connection to the would-be nun, but JS made it fairly believable, and I wasn't surprised at all that whatever faith he may have had in the past has been shaken. Like House, he's been through an awful lot in the last few years. Best scenes -- at the end, when he went to help Park, taking on the mentor/teacher role he should have with the newer doctors, and the last scene, especially the look between House and Chase when he came back to work and sat at the table.

#16

jany11

jany11

    Just Tuned In

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 12:53 PM

The need House has to make sure that he's a one-off is pretty much what rescues him as a character. Unlike Foreman or Cuddy, House knows what's wrong with him and despite his refusal to believe that he can be saved from himself, wants very much to not have company being what he sees as an irredeemable mess.


Totally agree. The scene with House and Chase toward the end was key for me. House telling Chase not to do "something stubborn and stupid" like he did and end up miserable. A rare insight from House himself as to his state of mind, and the first since the car crash and prison. Also noted that House's shirt was untucked for the first time this season. Could it mean he's slowly losing control over even the tiny things that have kept him together since being released from prison?

#17

romantic idiot

romantic idiot

    Stalker

  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Bangalore
  • Interests:Urban fantasy and paranormal romance, Buffy, Angel, Firefly, VM, FNL, Friends, MASH, Avatar, House, Farscape, Roswell, Glee, True Blood, Community, P&R, 30 Rock, The Good Wife, Boss, Downton Abbey, Coupling, old SYTYCD, Leverage, White Collar, Jonathan Groff, mutton, chicken and eggs.

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 1:12 PM

Ugh, I hate Adams. Why is the House world made of sanctimonious bitcas? And Park.

I was disappointed that Chase was so scientific about matters of faith in the end.

I thought he wasn't being scientific. He wanted the nun to stay, he couldn't argue faith with her, so he was trying to find a "scientific" basis to disprove her epiphany.

Trust Taub to do the only practical thing of all the 3. Okay, therapy works too, but it's not going to be applicable in similar situations later. Though I guess they'll be rare, but not with PPTH security being what it is.

I liked this episode well enough, but I have to say - my favourite part about it was the fact that Chase finally shaved.

#18

Shanna Marie

Shanna Marie

    Stalker

  • Gender:Female

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 2:32 PM

But *that* Chase has had a lot of things happen to him since then. To me, it's not inconsistant at all that Chase's faith has been wiped out--this is a man who has deliberately killed a patient and watched his marriage fall apart as a result of that, a marriage he fought to make happen. That kind of experience would test anyone's faith.


I don't really have a problem with his faith having changed since then. My issue was with the backstory they've given him, where it made it sound like he'd never really had faith -- he went into seminary because the nuns and priests at Catholic school were the closest thing he had to family, and he left not because of matters of faith but because he was shagging a married woman and got caught. He talked like faith was something he wanted to have but didn't really, and that's the part that's inconsistent with what's been shown before, where it sounded like he really did have faith, deep down inside, even though it was something he struggled with, and maybe he was afraid that bailing on seminary made him unworthy.

It just seems like the backstory made that whole aspect of his character more shallow instead of deeper, and it doesn't fit with the way his faith has been portrayed before. But I guess a character with a genuine faith wouldn't fit in this show's world view. He has to move away from it rather than toward it.

Then there's the fact that in "Damned if You Do," he commented on hating nuns but here he says the nuns at his Catholic school were the closest thing he had to family. If he saw nuns as surrogate family (which is a nice change from the usual "I went to Catholic school, so I hate nuns" cliche), would he recoil in horror from them the way he did in the earlier episode? It seems like the writers here remembered that Chase was Catholic and had been in seminary but left, but they hadn't actually seen any of the earlier episodes that addressed his religion.

#19

FakeLocke

FakeLocke

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 3:19 PM

There was something about that line was said that made me wonder if he invented that bit. About the groundskeeper's wife, I mean. I dunno. Like he didn't want to open up about his real reasons for leaving, so he made up a flippant one in keeping with his image of a manslut.


ITA. The whole story seemed rather contrived, and too pat. He was just trying locker-room-bravado to shelter his real religious underpinnings.

And no doctor working with House should really have much in the way of faith. FAITH is pretty much the opposite of diagnostic medicine, where known science, observable facts, and manifest symptoms dictate the conclusion. Personally, if it were me on the diagnostic table, I don't want my doctor to have any faith in a supreme being. DON'T LEAVE IT TO GOD.

And this would be the type of woman to appeal to Chase. Guilt-ridden, but not judgmental to others, reasonably attractive, enough background religion to be able to discuss matters of faith/theology, but needy enough to be a considerate lover. Granted, a couple of days is a little quick to unleash the "I think I love you" bomb on her, but it's only an hour-long show.

Did anyone else think the whole Holmes-ian "You're wearing a blue veil, meaning you're a postulate. You're also wearing a brown skirt, meaning you're a Carmelite..." was a little anvilicious for the Chase-is-House-lite crowd? As was the clean-shaven I-am-not-House Chase that we were treated to at the end.

I will admit that I liked the unspoken nod between the two (I've had those with my teenage son in my wife's presence). Men communicate a lot with nods. "Are you OK?"... "Yeah, I'm good."... "Don't tell anyone that I cared about you"... "No prob. Thanks." All that in two small nods.

#20

TheFinalRose

TheFinalRose

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 4:01 PM

I kind of expected Chase to blurt that out in one of his confrontations with House - that he'd killed a man, that a woman he thought loved him left him (on account of that murder), that he'd been shot. It IS a lot to go through, while seemingly keeping a lid on it, and only acting out by sleeping around.


I hope Jesse Spencer gets to do comedy in his next television series.


I liked this episode well enough, but I have to say - my favourite part about it was the fact that Chase finally shaved.


Amen! Now can we get the long blonde hair going again?

#21

BronnT

BronnT

    Channel Surfer

Posted Feb 15, 2012 @ 11:56 AM

Of the three character-based episodes they've done


Don't forget that Masters also got her own episode. But it wasn't as good as "Wilson" or "5 to 9," and it was for a recurring guest character instead of a cast member, so we can ignore that.

The one thing that bugged me about "Chase" was that he got thrown off the case, and it had no discernible effect at all. I mean, he was there when Adams found liver dysfunction, then he was in the ensuing DDX, then he spotted the jaw symptoms (don't know what they were) that led to the last diagnosis. Just about the only thing he didn't do was run the blood test to confirm T-cell lymphoma, and you have to be paying attention to realize that he's not doing that because he's off the case-it doesn't take 4 doctors to run a blood test anyway. He's still essentially acting like her doctor in that scene, since he's telling her that the test results will be back in an hour, that her only treatment option is chemo-therapy, and that the prognosis is very poor. For not being on the case, Chase was very much still involved in the case. If you're going to add a dramatic development to your story, don't kill the drama by making it fail to matter-they really needed to make it pay off by refusing to let Chase participate in any of the medicine afterward, or refusing to let him see the patient.

Beyond that, it was a good episode. Not as good as last week's, but pretty good. I laughed out loud at House squirting himself with a water gun, then at Taub being tackled by the janitor. And if anyone deserved a "day in the limelight" episode, it's Chase. Plus, at this point, I'm happy any time a patient actually has a personality, rather than exist just to throw off symptoms and give us a puzzle. The writers too often use the patient of the week the same way House does (purely as a puzzle, rather than a character to be cared about), and they always generate dramatic new symptoms any time they're on screen for more than 20 seconds. They didn't exactly go that route this time.

#22

AriAU

AriAU

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 16, 2012 @ 4:36 PM

I assume it was no coincidence that Moira was a dead ringer for Cameron, especially with the habit on, so that it showed his loss of faith lead to losing Cameron and then losing Moira since she found faith....or is that too deep?

#23

QueenofCups

QueenofCups

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 19, 2012 @ 2:28 PM

Did anyone else think the whole Holmes-ian "You're wearing a blue veil, meaning you're a postulate. You're also wearing a brown skirt, meaning you're a Carmelite..." was a little anvilicious for the Chase-is-House-lite crowd?


This didn't seem at all Housian too me. A former seminarian recognizing the habit of a particular order of nuns doesn't involve any deductive reasoning. It would be similar to a college football fan recognizing the uniform of a particular team.

Of the three "supporting character becomes the lead" episodes, I'd put in somewhere in the middle. It was better than the awful "5 to 9". I think the writers have lost touch with who Chase is, since for so long he's just a guy on the screen holding a clipboard for thirty seconds an episode.

House's show-runners are lavish spenders. They are spending good money for RSL and then they just end up using him for thirty seconds in a role that could have gone to an extra. He hasn't really had anything to do since "Transplant". What a waste! It will pay for RSL's daughter to go to Harvard, or help feed his wife's horses, I guess.

#24

HyacinthBucket

HyacinthBucket

    Couch Potato

Posted Feb 20, 2012 @ 9:15 AM

I don't really have a problem with his faith having changed since then. My issue was with the backstory they've given him, where it made it sound like he'd never really had faith -- he went into seminary because the nuns and priests at Catholic school were the closest thing he had to family, and he left not because of matters of faith but because he was shagging a married woman and got caught. He talked like faith was something he wanted to have but didn't really, and that's the part that's inconsistent with what's been shown before, where it sounded like he really did have faith, deep down inside, even though it was something he struggled with, and maybe he was afraid that bailing on seminary made him unworthy.


Shanna Marie, that is exactly what bothered me about this Chase episode. Ever since Chase's background became known in "Damned if You Do," I have been waiting for the writers to go back to it. I guess they had to get rid of Thirteen and Cuddy before they bothered to find time to write for Chase again, and the result was a bit disappointing to me. Jesse Spencer was great, as usual, but I hated that they gave such a shallow reason for Chase leaving the seminary. Coincidentally, writer Eli Attie was also involved in writing Cameron's exit in early Season 6, and at that time I questioned why a new writer would be given the task of writing such an important story line for an original character. I didn't think the issues with Cameron leaving were true to her original character, just as I didn't feel Chase's reason for leaving the seminary was true to his original character. (I'll take any further comments about Cameron's issues to her own thread or that episode thread, but I just wanted to comment about my reason for not particularly liking this writer.)

There has never been any doubt in my mind that House cares deeply for Chase, and I have always felt that Chase is more like House than Foreman will ever be. I like that Chase knows that House cares about him, but I preferred the way the writers told us that House cared for Foreman in the Euphoria episodes from Season 2. The look House gives Foreman's empty chair at the DDx table, and using clinic duty to distract himself from worrying about Foreman was priceless. I wanted that for Chase, too.

In the first two seasons, we may have shaken our heads at House's antics and wondered how he could possibly keep his job, but at least we knew that it was always in pursuit of a diagnosis for the patient. It could be humorous, but there was a reason for it. In this episode, House was lobbing water balloons at Taub in the lobby with people walking around, and shooting paintballs in the office. I couldn't help but laugh when the janitor tackled Taub because the visual was so funny, but I had to grimace, too. The things House gets away with have gone beyond ridiculous, and I think this kind of over-the-top silliness has brought the show down over the last few years.

#25

Truckhorse

Truckhorse

    Channel Surfer

Posted Feb 23, 2012 @ 12:01 AM

Also: is it just me, or is it an inevitable function of being in the 8th season, but does most of the backstory that's unveiled about characters (especially longstanding characters like Chase) feel like it's being shoe-horned in, or troweled-on? Nothing feels organic to me anymore.


It's not just you. It the last few seasons, there've been lots of character developments that feel hasty and tacked-on, like Thirteen's insta-brother with Parkinson's in 'The Dig.' Also whiplash reversals, like Cameron saying she she didn't know if she ever really loved Chase in 'Lockdown.' Really? And Kutner, the happiest guy on five seasons of House, committed suicide? I love this show and these writers, but sometimes it feels like the prevailing ethic in the writer's room is 'Oh why not?' whenever anyone proposes a new take on an established character.

#26

QueenofCups

QueenofCups

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 23, 2012 @ 2:22 AM

It bothered me that Chase didn't have any blinds or curtains. He's on the ground floor so that passers-by and neighbours can look in. Even if he and his perpetual parade of one-night stands don't care about privacy, you'd think Chase would care up getting his sleep. The sun would wake them up very early in the morning, especially in summer.

#27

SnarkySheep

SnarkySheep

    Fanatic

  • Gender:Female
  • Location:CT

Posted Mar 19, 2012 @ 1:02 PM

Finally got around to watching this one...

At this point, I think I have to conclude that Chase is an extremely troubled individual. IMO he always has been, but perhaps the intensity of those driving feelings has increased, and the focus changed ever since Cameron left.

That said, I think we would have been seeing a very different kind of character/story arc had Jennifer Morrison not left. That whole thing always seemed a bit abrupt and odd to me, and thus Chase's storylines after the fact as well. We are getting all kinds of information, largely retro-conned; but given what we know of Chase thus far, combining that emotional turmoil with the constant comparison to House, makes me wonder how much of it, if any, is actually true.

Finally, in regard to the House/Chase relationship, I think TPTB have always set the two almost like surrogate father/son. After all, House was the one to plan an elaborate bachelor party for Chase, which is something a father might do, and most certainly there was nothing in it for House, as he didn't even want to attend himself. With these moment throughout the years in light, I think that's why neither is too upset at this time of any grudge or unaccepted apology hanging in the air; much like parents and children, both know that they'll have their issues and yet still remain in one another's lives.

#28

Forn

Forn

    Couch Potato

Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 10:58 AM

I agree. I can buy that Chase has lost his faith (even though it's kind of a drag that no one on this show can be genuinely religious or even spiritual). I do wish we'd seen more of his religious crisis in the last couple years, rather than just a lot of his sleeping around, so that it didn't seem so sudden now.

Now that this show is coming to an end, I have to say one of the main things I've disliked about it is the smug stance they've taken on religion and spirituality. None of the doctors were allowed to have faith, because of course no one of any intelligence can be spiritual. I can take House being so atheistic, since it goes well with his cynicism. But Wilson is just as dismissive: "Let them have their fairy tales".

The occasional patient is allowed to have faith, although there is always some element of doubt sown in. But none of the doctors, none of the professional staff, were allowed to be spiritual. Chase was the one exception. But of course, what do they do? Change him into having the same attitude as the rest of them. I remember the episode you're talking about, and I was like "What? Chase lost his faith? When did this happen?". It was like "Well, he's had bad things happen to him, so of course he's lost his faith". Bleh. Weak sauce.

Obviously they didn't shy away from the subject of faith, they weren't afraid of it. It's just too bad they always had to take the same perspective on it. I'm sure this is the message the creators or producers wanted to send, so it's their right. But I don't have to appreciate it, either.