Jump to content

The Bronson Pinchot Project


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.

58 replies to this topic

#1

WileyCoyote

WileyCoyote

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 6, 2012 @ 2:21 AM

Wow, I know there isn't much of an expectation on "The Do It Yourself Network", but wow. The guy who played Balki, who hasn't worked anywhere for 15 years?

You know, I don't know whether to compliment him for not wearing a toupee, or stare every time the camera shows the back of his head. Did he NOT get the memo about maybe... cutting his hair shorter when he develops a big patch like that? It looks WORSE when hes got the same old "Perfect Strangers" floppy hair-do otherwise.

Also... Bronson. Can you at least PRETEND to do some of the work? I don't think the first episode I saw showed him as much as lifting a finger. He didn't even HOLD stuff for the two "assistants"---they did it all. So not so much "Do It Yourself" as much as "Pay Guys To Do It and Talk About It".

#2

biakbiak

biakbiak

    Stalker

  • Gender:Female

Posted Feb 6, 2012 @ 2:23 AM

The guy who played Balki, who hasn't worked anywhere for 15 years?


I didn't see the show and while he hasn't had a regular gig, he certainly has been in things he just hasn't been a series regular.

Edited by biakbiak, Feb 6, 2012 @ 2:24 AM.


#3

WileyCoyote

WileyCoyote

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 6, 2012 @ 2:28 AM

I wonder if he has a bad back or something. He wouldn't even lift a box from the post office, or move a piece of wood from the salvage yard into his truck.

he certainly has been in things he just hasn't been on a series regular.

I was being a bit sarcastic. I meant anything "of note". Which IS a judgement call admittedly.

I mean 1 episode of "Chuck"? Great. I even kind of remember it. One episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit? I don't remember it but that's nice. 1 of Hawaii Five-0? Okay, that's not bad.

But overall he's not got much of a career anymore. His name alone certainly isn't going to draw people to this show.

#4

Chit Chat

Chit Chat

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 12, 2012 @ 11:43 AM

Did anybody else catch the premier of Bronson's new DIY show? His first project was to renovate his 1840 Greek Revival house. Although I'm not a fan of this particular style, I did find the show interesting and enjoyed watching him search for authentic pieces to renovate the house with.

http://www.medialife...roject-fun-.asp

#5

Mondrianyone

Mondrianyone

    Couch Potato

  • Gender:Female

Posted Feb 12, 2012 @ 2:10 PM

I did, and I agree with your review, Chit Chat. I liked looking at the finished kitchen, but it's not something I'd want to live in. A little too contrived--I wouldn't want to have to open each of those concealing panels every time I needed to use the oven, or the microwave, or the fridge. And if you were someone with kids, you'd absolutely never want all that old peeling paint on everything (probably leaded paint, too). But it was very dramatic, the light was lovely, a great party kitchen the way it led out to that beautiful garden gazebo, and I respected his love for and knowledge of old pieces and period elements. He seems smart, and I think the show will be fun to watch, not necessarily to take seriously.

What made me laugh was how he put on the bandanna sweatband at the start of every workday and then did virtually no physical labor himself. Sweatband probably stays pretty sweat-free!

#6

Chit Chat

Chit Chat

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 12, 2012 @ 3:07 PM

and I respected his love for and knowledge of old pieces and period elements.

ITA, and that's what made it interesting to me. He knew what he was talking about. I could understand him being upset about the glass globes being broken. To think that those had made it this far, then to get broken in shipping. It looked like the seller did a piss-poor job of packing them. How sad! I really liked learning about the wavy glass too.

That was funny about the bandanna! He seems like he'd be a fun person to be around and/or work with.

#7

shlbycindyk

shlbycindyk

    Couch Potato

Posted Feb 13, 2012 @ 9:57 AM

I saw this show for the first time this weekend and I liked it. I'm a little tired of the decorating shows where they want to update everything. After a while all the updated kitchens and bathrooms start to look alike to me. So it's nice to see a show that wants to preserve and restore homes back to their original design. It broke my heart to see the broken glass globes and I think it bothered him a lot too. I read an article on him and it said he's been doing this for a number of years so I think he really knows what he is doing.

Edited by shlbycindyk, Feb 13, 2012 @ 9:58 AM.


#8

bestimw

bestimw

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Feb 19, 2012 @ 5:15 PM

I enjoyed last night's show as much as the first. I'm afraid this is going to be a short run show though, so I'm going to enjoy it while I can.

The oval gable vent was absolutely the way to go, with the delicate louvers compared to the chunky ones in the first vent he had in. That first one looked like fiberglass or vinyl, which I really doubt he would use.

I wonder if it was never his intention to actually leave it there, but was put in to ratchet up a little (very little) tension. If so, that's disappointing.

I'm still going to watch.

#9

Chit Chat

Chit Chat

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 19, 2012 @ 6:29 PM

I liked the oval gable too. Sometimes what you think will work when remodeling looks very different up close than it did in your mind!

I'm enjoying this show. It is funny how Bronson avoids most of the manual labor though! The carriage house did turn out nicely. Mike did a good job with the workshop part of it too. I enjoy seeing all of the salvage pieces. There's a store not far from me that sells lots of that kind of stuff, and I find it interesting to see stuff with a lot of history attached to it.

#10

Mondrianyone

Mondrianyone

    Couch Potato

  • Gender:Female

Posted Feb 19, 2012 @ 6:39 PM

Gee, the fact that the original thread started for this show has been sucked into a thread started under another category makes me sound like a total moron for repeating something that's now already been said, even though it wasn't at the time. (Huh?) Anyway, Bronson is sticking to his fairly strict no-physical-labor policy, but that's okay with me--he can afford to pay other people to do the heavy lifting, and that's what I'd do, too! Plus, if the worst thing he does to ratchet up drama is pretend to choose the wrong vent and then pretend to change his mind, that's also fine. Compared to most of the faux plotlines on home-dec and real-estate shows, that doesn't even count as a blip on the radar.

I went to Google Maps street view and put the little man on the one main street in Harford, PA, and there the house is, right across from the teeny outhouse post office, just like on TV, so they're not faking that either. Not sure I believe that Mikey is project-managing for real, but I'll let that go. I'm finding this lots of fun to watch, a very welcome change of pace from all granite and stainless steel all the time. It's nice to see someone who does the opposite of walk into a perfectly fine house and scream "Gut it! Gut it all!" Nice to see someone trying to save a little piece of the past. And if he truly does have a bunch of other houses in town, maybe there's material for a second season.

#11

Chit Chat

Chit Chat

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 19, 2012 @ 8:18 PM

Bronson is fun to watch. This is a nice change of pace from some of the other how-to shows. It's interesting just what you can do with those salvaged items. Many of them are just in need of the paint being stripped and then repainted. Things like the vent for the carriage house are a nice touch to a project like that. Makes me want to shop the vintage stores more often!

Some of the stuff he's done so far really wasn't that expensive, just labor-intensive. I like Bronson's attitude and the laid-back atmosphere of the show.

I was thinking about your post Mondrianyone about the bandana & lack of physical labor when Bronson was talking about just how heavy that door was, and how he wasn't helping with it. It made me LOL during this latest episode.

#12

PrincessLuceval

PrincessLuceval

    Stalker

Posted Feb 19, 2012 @ 8:50 PM

I caught the recent show, and liked it. I loved how the wood from the barn was used around the carriage house door. And Bronson painting the ivy was a nice touch. I like that it's just a half hour; and I like that it's on late enough that I'll record it to get through the commercials.

#13

Mondrianyone

Mondrianyone

    Couch Potato

  • Gender:Female

Posted Feb 26, 2012 @ 1:07 AM

I was thinking about your post Mondrianyone about the bandana & lack of physical labor when Bronson was talking about just how heavy that door was, and how he wasn't helping with it. It made me LOL during this latest episode.

I may e-mail him via the network and extend a personal offer to launder that bandanna, Chit Chat. 'Cause I can see that it's starting to get kind of schmutzy from his just standing around where there's sawing and plastering being done by other people. It was funny how he didn't even take it off to go on that road trip. He's obviously deeply committed to it.

I can't believe he had Mikey sand that entire huge floor with a six-inch hand sander! Although I guess it did keep him occupied.

That pale seashell color was beautiful, but I suspect it's way out of Bronson's comfort zone to use anything but white. The space did turn out gorgeous, mainly because of those fabulous windows. And I definitely coveted some of the objects in his storehouse of vintage pieces. Plus, it's nice to hear someone who has the vocabulary to describe the aesthetics of a space in an educated, colorful way. So even if he never actually picks up a hammer, I think I'm in for the full run.

#14

Zanne

Zanne

    Stalker

  • Gender:Female
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:I'm a female of the species - what species, I'll leave up to you. Just to clarify my name since it makes people think I'm a boy...it's not Zane like rain, but Zanne like fan.

Posted Feb 26, 2012 @ 2:13 PM

I'm beginning to wonder if he bought the entire town. Last night's episode was house #2! I think I had assumed from what I had heard of the original premise that he'd be renovating the one house, but it looks like that one is pretty much complete.

I can't believe he had Mikey sand that entire huge floor with a six-inch hand sander!


Yes! I was wondering why they couldn't find someone to help him out. Even applying the wax (?) would be time consuming and hard for one person to do.

#15

toolazy

toolazy

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 6, 2012 @ 11:13 PM

I really like this show but all of his spaces are very pale and washed-out looking. Other than that, I love his taste and I love what he's doing in general.

If I won the lottery, that's what I'd with myself. Buy old houses and pay people to restore them while I shopped and watched them work.

Another thing I like is that there is very little, if any, drama around money. I know that's not realistic in most renovations but it's relaxing that there doesn't seem to be very much financial stress at all.

#16

SparksFan59

SparksFan59

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 7, 2012 @ 7:18 PM

I love this show and how Bronson collects salvage from old torn down businesses and homes to use on his renovation. Such a nice change from the regular type decorating show.


I love that it's paired with The Vanilla Ice Project, since I also watch that one as well.

#17

ThreeDimen

ThreeDimen

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 10, 2012 @ 11:10 PM

I'm a Philistine because I kept hoping he was going to break out the white exterior paint. Won't unpainted wood like that eventually rot?

Mt. Vernon has chamfered wood siding like Pinchot did on the back.

#18

MsFlibbles

MsFlibbles

    Video Archivist

Posted Mar 11, 2012 @ 8:49 PM

If you get Comcast this show is now on Demand.

Bronson is such a cutie pie. Love that he is trying to save these homes. Poor Mikey having to sand those floorboards with such a small sander. At least it was electric and not just sandpaper.

#19

WileyCoyote

WileyCoyote

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 14, 2012 @ 3:16 PM

Heh, well to be more accurate he's trying to have his employees save those homes!

#20

All Over Blue

All Over Blue

    Video Archivist

Posted Mar 18, 2012 @ 5:41 PM

I watched the marathon today. I love this show. I watch other DIY shows, but I have learned more about architecture today than I have on all the other shows combined. I love old buildings and now I will be looking for some of those details that Pinchot talked about

I did notice that he doesn't do any actual work, but he doesn't need to. It's his creativity and knowledge that make this show unique. Plus, I am glad to see tradesmen employed in such great projects.

Edited by All Over Blue, Mar 18, 2012 @ 5:42 PM.


#21

PrincessLuceval

PrincessLuceval

    Stalker

Posted Mar 19, 2012 @ 7:27 AM

And they all seem to really like him, a lot. Mikey cracks me up. I thought the lengths they took to hide all the appliances in the "country kitchen" were kind of extreme. I guess not my cup of tea, but it really looked interesting. I do like how he doesn't always paint his salvaged wood items, but I have to wonder - will they eventually continue to flake?

#22

Ima Pilgrim

Ima Pilgrim

    Fanatic

Posted Apr 4, 2012 @ 8:28 PM

I'd like to meet his builder, the guy who is actually repurposing all this salvaged stuff, I would be all over him like white on rice. I have a couple of awesome salvage yards near me, but the only thing I've managed to buy is a milk glass towel bar that I could put up myself, the rest of the stuff needs retrofitting by someone who is talented and cares to take the time. Loved the fridge hider, although I think it might be cumbersome. I do take exception to his using old single pane windows in the kitchen, however, ain't no R value in those at all, it'll be freezing in that house.

#23

LadyEight

LadyEight

    Couch Potato

Posted Apr 20, 2012 @ 3:48 PM

I saw the one with the Greek revival house. I liked watching how he designed the fireplace, and why he made the choices he did. I love old houses. I would love to live in a house like that. But it was interesting; Bronson seems to know his stuff about history and architecture, and I would like to watch to learn more about that.

#24

tortuga

tortuga

    Couch Potato

Posted Apr 22, 2012 @ 6:37 PM

I guess I admire his commitment to saving old buildings and architectural elements, but his design aesthetic drives me crazy. Are people really expected to live I these houses when they're finished? I just see paint chips - OLD paint chips - getting over everything. How many times do you get kelated before you decide that this house was a bad choice?

#25

catlover79

catlover79

    Fanatic

Posted May 22, 2012 @ 7:07 PM

In regards to Bronson not being all that physically involved in the renovations, I have a few thoughts.

It may be a better idea for DIY to market the program with Bronson as host/commentator. He really does know his history, and his knowledge is impressive.

Don't forget that Bronson is best known for playing Balki, one of the most physically challenging and taxing roles in television history. I loved Perfect Strangers as a kid but looking at it now through adult eyes...I am amazed at the sheer amount of physical humor Bronson and Mark Linn-Baker as Larry had to take on week after week for 6 1/2 years. They were in their late 20s/early 30s at this time, but all the lifting, spinning, choking, falling, and grabbing tends to take a lifetime toll on the body, especially the neck/back area.

Besides, Bronson was the one carrying Mark at the end of all those Dances for Joy. So I cannot blame him one iota for having a crew handle the grunt work. I'd do the same thing if I was him!!!!

P.S. Am I the only one who totally sees Balki doing something like this - renovating old houses for others? Could Extreme Home Makeover: Mypos be too far off in the future? ;-)

And yes - he really does need to do something about his rapidly thinning hair. That big bald spot sticks out like a sore thumb!!

Edited by catlover79, May 22, 2012 @ 7:16 PM.


#26

MsGonzo

MsGonzo

    Video Archivist

Posted May 25, 2012 @ 11:23 AM

I haven't seen this entire series, only a few shows, but it just hurts to see BP mess up a beautiful historic home. I know he's trying to maintain the aged character of the house, but it would be so much better served if he were not so hung up on peeling wood and spooky plaster figures. What is so wrong with a beautiful restoration? It broke my heart to see that lovely 18th Century Chippendale style chair re-upholstered with what looked like a worn out dish rag. Since money is no object, I would much rather see him renovate/restore the shell of the house to tip-top standards, and then he could decorate it as weird as he wanted to.

I was also surprised to see his crew smoking during their breaks. You just don't see that as a rule on television anymore.

#27

wyndham

wyndham

    Fanatic

Posted Jan 1, 2013 @ 3:42 PM

I caught the marathon of this show today and quite liked it. Bronson certainly has the knowledge about the architecture of the houses he's working on. I do have to agree with other posters on the old lead paint that's left on everywhere. That could have been sanded down/cleaned off-whatever and then repainted or stained to still look old but not grubby. Also that Chippendale chair deserved a much nicer fabric-the original most certainly did not have that tatty old kind of fabric on it. All in all, its wonderful that he's saving and renovating old houses using mostly salvaged materials.

#28

not Bridget

not Bridget

    Fanatic

Posted Jan 1, 2013 @ 4:30 PM

I caught today's marathon, too, & am looking forward to the new season starting soon. Bronson Pinchot is not a house-flipper. (Not even a historically-respectful one like the lady on Rehab Addict--which I also like.) He's doing this for his own pleasure. From a Pennsylvania paper:

Home base is Pinchot's circa 1840 mansion in the center of Harford, a town of about 1,300 people. It was the home of state Sen. Edward Jones in the early 1900s and had more recently served as office space. Pinchot bought the place in 2000.

"I wanted a Greek Revival house within five driving hours of New York City," Pinchot said. When he first walked in, he said, he knew he would buy it.

When he arrived, the scene couldn't have been better staged by a Hollywood set designer: The house smelled of cinnamon toast, the air outside smelled of fresh manure, a woman pushing a baby carriage paused to admire a neighbor's fuchsia roses across the street....

He now owns six historic properties in Harford, including what was a burned-out vacant home also from around 1840 and a sweet blue-shingled building that houses the town's post office. Eventually, he hopes many of the properties will be places for visiting friends to stay.


The houses are a bit far from any major city to suit commuters & most of them will not be comfortable in all weather. But Pinchot is spending his money to express his own artistic vision. Despite the "just guys" interplay with his workmen (who are probably glad to have good jobs in what seems a rather quiet part of the world), he's a serious aesthete...

#29

Lola16

Lola16

    Fanatic

Posted Jan 17, 2013 @ 8:53 PM

Caught this on HGTV today. Personally I don't think restore means old ratty tattered paint flaking stuff. It's like he's trying to make the houses look like they were last lived in in 1890 and have sat vacant since. Stuff from the 1800's didn't start out worn and flaky. Nothing wrong with repainting stuff.

Hated the old doors in the kitchen covering up all appliances. How are you to use the ovens? Does the door swing open flat? If it did, then you'd be blocking the counter. And you'd have to make sure the oven was sufficiently cooled before closing the door.

#30

Chit Chat

Chit Chat

    Fanatic

Posted Jan 17, 2013 @ 9:35 PM

I like Bronson and his crew, but I don't care for his particular taste in the remodel of the Federal house. It's too cold and uninviting to me. However, I do appreciate that he loves it and is very knowledgeable about the materials he chooses. It's interesting and I enjoy the way he presents each episode.