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X Factor (US)


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#1

Dejana

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Posted Aug 9, 2011 @ 9:22 PM

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Since its debut in 2004, THE X FACTOR has remained the U.K.'s #1 program for the last seven years, peaking with an audience of 21 million for its 2010 finale. The format swiftly broke similar records around the world, where local versions have consistently rated #1. The series has received numerous honors worldwide, and more than 100 million records have been sold by artists launched through the series, including over 90 #1 singles and albums and 150 Top Ten records.

In a departure from other singing competition series, the first time contestants audition for THE X FACTOR judges, Simon Cowell, Antonio "L.A." Reid, Paula Abdul and Nicole Scherzinger, they will do so in front of an audience of thousands - raising the stakes and increasing the pressure to impress not only the judges, but also a potential legion of fans. This will be the ultimate test to prove they have the vocal ability, charisma and stage presence that it takes to win an unprecedented $5 million recording contract with Syco/Sony Music.

THE X FACTOR is produced by Syco Television and FremantleMedia North America. Simon Cowell, Rob Wade and Siobhan Greene are executive producers for Syco Television. Cecile Frot-Coutaz, Richard Holloway and Andrew Llinares serve as executive producers for FremantleMedia North America.


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#2

getawayjordan

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Posted Aug 11, 2011 @ 11:11 AM

In a departure from other singing competition series, the first time contestants audition for THE X FACTOR judges, Simon Cowell, Antonio "L.A." Reid, Paula Abdul and Nicole Scherzinger, they will do so in front of an audience of thousands - raising the stakes and increasing the pressure to impress not only the judges, but also a potential legion of fans.


Mixed emotions about seeing Simon cut down a new crop of hopefuls, but this new "cast of thousands" auditioning format should help stir the pot and make things more interesting. My fear is that the crowd will juice Simon up more than usual and prompt him to be crueller than usual.
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#3

WileyCoyote

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Posted Aug 12, 2011 @ 1:42 AM

In a departure from other singing competition series, the first time contestants audition for THE X FACTOR judges, Simon Cowell, Antonio "L.A." Reid, Paula Abdul and Nicole Scherzinger, they will do so in front of an audience of thousands - raising the stakes and increasing the pressure to impress not only the judges, but also a potential legion of fans.

I forget. Were The Voice spinny chair auditions in front of a live (in-studio) audience or not?

Edited by WileyCoyote, Aug 12, 2011 @ 1:45 AM.

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#4

getawayjordan

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Posted Aug 12, 2011 @ 1:47 AM

I forget. Were The Voice spinny chair auditions in front of a live audience or not?


Yes, I believe it was.
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#5

WileyCoyote

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Posted Aug 12, 2011 @ 1:48 AM

So "in a departure from other singing competition series" is a marketing lie, I guess.
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#6

getawayjordan

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Posted Aug 12, 2011 @ 8:55 AM

So "in a departure from other singing competition series" is a marketing lie, I guess.


Marketing.....Lying.....what's the diff? Toe-may-toe......Toe-mah-toe....
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#7

tuco6

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Posted Aug 12, 2011 @ 9:19 AM

To be fair, the UK X Factor began doing initial auditions in front of a live audience before The Voice started. Of course, I think that was cribbed from Britain's/America's Got Talent. So, it's a marketing lie, but the idea originated from Cowell's group.
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#8

vb68

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Posted Aug 16, 2011 @ 8:50 PM

The ads that I saw during pre-season football look exactly like Idol. By that, I mean there are some bad auditions, and Simon lets loose an insult or two.

Edited by vb68, Aug 17, 2011 @ 11:58 AM.

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#9

getawayjordan

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Posted Aug 16, 2011 @ 11:35 PM

The ads that I saw during pre-season football look exactly like Idol. By that, i mean there are some bad auditions, and Simon lets loose an insult or two.


Sure. It's just another case of give the people what they want. IDOL 2.0. We expect Simon to crush yet another poor contestant's fragile egos. Then we laugh nervously because we're glad it's not us and wait for him to blindside the next poor victim.
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#10

chesslover

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 12:01 AM

Call me mean but I hope this show bombs. I also hope a wgwg wins. To those who will be watching I say good night and good luck.
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#11

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 1:01 AM

I also hope a wgwg wins.


Do they allow instruments on this show?
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#12

vb68

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 12:05 PM

I'm not completely sure, but wouldn't they almost have to allow them? I mean, I think it would be hard to allow groups on without anybody playing an instrument.
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#13

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 1:02 PM

I'm not completely sure, but wouldn't they almost have to allow them? I mean, I think it would be hard to allow groups on without anybody playing an instrument.

Normally I'd agree that's true, but we have to remember "where" Simon Cowell comes from, creatively--"boy bands" and "girl groups" (those are the actual names of the genres)--which both traditionally are groups with three to five members who all do nothing but sing. Think of 'N Sync and Destiny's Child. That's Simon's bailiwick, only the UK versions.

Edited by WileyCoyote, Aug 17, 2011 @ 1:05 PM.

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#14

getawayjordan

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 3:59 PM

I'm not completely sure, but wouldn't they almost have to allow them? I mean, I think it would be hard to allow groups on without anybody playing an instrument.


Oh. My bad. I'm not really familiar with X Factor. I didn't know they had groups. I assumed they were set up for single vocalists like that other singing competition .
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#15

AuroraAustralis

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 4:21 PM

So "in a departure from other singing competition series" is a marketing lie, I guess.


Well, it says 'in front of an audience of thousands'. I think The Voice was more like dozens.

I miss Simon. I'm looking forward to this.
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#16

NotPatrick

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 5:19 PM

To be fair, the UK X Factor began doing initial auditions in front of a live audience before The Voice started. Of course, I think that was cribbed from Britain's/America's Got Talent. So, it's a marketing lie, but the idea originated from Cowell's group.


It was yet another off-shoot of the carnival of Susan Boyle bullshit. Simon said that that *magical moment* made him realise how much better it was to have a live crowd for the auditions as he never would have realised the power of the hairy angel unless he'd seen her magical powers bellow out over an audience of yadda yadda yadda. Basically it's just to validate his opinions even more - the good auditions get a rapturous audience and the bad ones get booed off and a peanut gallery of eye-rolls and rude chants.

Instruments are allowed on the show - the last UK winner used a guitar on occasion and Katie Weasel waggled her fingers in the general direction of a keyboard once. In terms of groups there haven't really been any that used any for a long time - it was a feature more of early series when you'd have unholy cheesy "two brothers with guitars" acts. I don't think there's ever been a "proper band" and they don't even tend to audition.

Edited by NotPatrick, Aug 17, 2011 @ 5:20 PM.

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#17

WileyCoyote

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 5:31 PM

In terms of groups there haven't really been any that used any for a long time - it was a feature more of early series when you'd have unholy cheesy "two brothers with guitars" acts. I don't think there's ever been a "proper band" and they don't even tend to audition.

But see that's a cultural difference I think. Boy bands certainly have a firm history in the US, but overall they simply went through a hot period of years about a generation ago, and otherwise aren't a main driver of American culture.

I mean its not like the UK doesn't over the long-term favor "real" bands too (hello? Just about most of the big groups of the 60s and 70s AND 80s?). But Simon's had a lot of years to break his home country in on the idea of boy bands and girl groups, and that's the expectation there now from these shows specifically. Whereas I think right out of the gate, whoever wins X-Factor US is going to be marketed HARD, and expected to chart well. And at this point I think the compass is pointed towards non-boy-bands in the U.S., at least still somewhat. I mean even the most boy bandish current American group out there, the Jonas Brothers, play instruments.

But the show's format is a problem, since it seems like they define "singing group" as "all of them must sing". Sure, even Ringo and George sang, but it was John and Paul who carried the weight--and it doesn't sound like X-Factor allows that kind of vibe to happen.

Edited by WileyCoyote, Aug 17, 2011 @ 5:33 PM.

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#18

vb68

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 8:23 PM

Mariah is in as Simon's mentor for his group. This sounds like a reaction to The Voice to me.
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#19

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 9:21 PM

I don't think there's ever been a "proper band" and they don't even tend to audition.


Ok, I'll bite. What's a "proper band?"
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#20

vb68

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Posted Aug 17, 2011 @ 10:41 PM

I guess it's just my bias, but when I hear the word "band" (or even "group" in a musical sense), I do think of instruments. But now that I really think about what we are talking about, yeah I can see that few would actually want to try out. Pity. That was one thing I was kind of interested to see on this show.
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#21

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Posted Aug 18, 2011 @ 12:18 AM

Ok, I'll bite. What's a "proper band?"

Nah I get it. Its vs. "Boy Band" (or the female version, "Girl Group").

Which despite "band" in the name, I think more of as "singing groups".

Although technically, per Websters, ANY grouping, no matter WHAT they are or what they are doing, can be referred to as "a band".

a group of persons, animals, or things; especially : a group of musicians organized for ensemble playing


So apparently a pile of rocks can be "a band of rocks".
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#22

NotPatrick

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Posted Aug 18, 2011 @ 6:47 AM

I did put in inverted commas to indicate that it's not a concept I take terribly seriously (much the same as "real music"), but I'd guess a "proper band" would be seen to be one who were self-sustaining - played all their own music and wrote their own material, as opposed to being a bunch of singers doing cover songs to a backing track. I think JLS did their own original material before the show, but I'm struggling to think of any other UK "Groups Category" people who did, as opposed to the solo artists, many of whom write their own stuff and play instruments. In the first series for example the groups were a blind guy and his friend who toured clubs doing covers, four members of a College operatic society doing classical covers of pop songs, and three women who sang in Gospel choir in church. Most of the groups these days aren't even "groups" at all - they're solo acts who get shoved together at Boot Camp.

Obviously this is just the UK show, which is the template he's going from, but which I'm sure he'll diverge from if he thinks there's money in it from a different musical culture. I definitely wouldn't bet against a Lady Antebellum/Sugarland derivative in the Groups category somewhere for example.

But the show's format is a problem, since it seems like they define "singing group" as "all of them must sing". Sure, even Ringo and George sang, but it was John and Paul who carried the weight--and it doesn't sound like X-Factor allows that kind of vibe to happen.


As the series goes on, the groups tend to winnow down to the usual girl/boy band formula - two strongest vocallists doing all the work, three others at the back providing warm bodies. There was one famous VT in Series 4 where someone in a girlband complained that their group shouldn't be called "Hope", but "Phoebe And The Woo Woo Girls" because Phoebe did all the singing and the other four just stood at the back going "WOO WOO!". That's pretty much the vibe for most of the groups.
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#23

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Posted Aug 18, 2011 @ 12:36 PM

I'll reserve judgement on X Factor until I see an episode or two. I am glad that IDOL is getting more competition as that may be the only way they will be forced to retool their tired format.
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#24

vb68

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Posted Aug 18, 2011 @ 3:37 PM

I'm going to be interested in how they differentiate this from The Voice. It sounds even closer to that than Idol.
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#25

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Posted Aug 18, 2011 @ 4:13 PM

Its got Simon on it.

There!

XF came first of course because internationally The Voice was aping the UK version of XF. But your average American viewer probably won't know that and stands a good chance of seeing this show as Simon's Voice copy.
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#26

vb68

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Posted Aug 19, 2011 @ 11:30 PM

Its got Simon on it.


Haha. I really walked into that one. :)
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#27

Vienna Woods

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Posted Aug 20, 2011 @ 12:48 AM

I did put in inverted commas to indicate that it's not a concept I take terribly seriously (much the same as "real music"), but I'd guess a "proper band" would be seen to be one who were self-sustaining - played all their own music and wrote their own material, as opposed to being a bunch of singers doing cover songs to a backing track.


In a promotional video about the American X Factor in February 2011, Simon Cowell took pains to say that the show was open to "vocal groups."

I also recall that, in the first series of the British X Factor in 2004, Tabby Callaghan brought his band with him but was told at the auditions that only "vocal groups" could audition. The judges advised him to audition as a soloist, and he did so. He ended up finishing third.

At least, that was the story. I've learned to take what is presented on these shows with an earth mover of salt.
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#28

vb68

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Posted Aug 25, 2011 @ 12:07 AM

A pretty catty Simon interview here.
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#29

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Posted Aug 25, 2011 @ 10:11 AM

Its got Simon on it.


And?

Respectfully, I don't care that X-FACTOR has Simon. I use to appreciate the dry-wit Brit's candor on IDOL because he seemed to be the only one willing to tell the contestants what they needed to hear (as opposed to what they wanted to hear). But sadly, his rudeness schtick has gotten a little long in the tooth and IMO he has always been overrated as a starmaker.
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#30

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Posted Aug 25, 2011 @ 10:57 AM

I'm not sure what you are disagreeing with here. I didn't endorse Simon. OR diss him. It was a neutral statement: "It's got Simon on it".

You don't have to like Simon. The question being answered was "how (will) they differentiate this from The Voice".

It was simply a fact being stated, albeit humorously. The show is being sold as "Simon's show". That's why its not The Voice. Liking him or caring about him has nothing to do with the analysis that the show is being framed around him. It has everything to do, I assume, with someone's individual choice to watch it or not watch it, but that's a different question than the one which was asked.

Edited by WileyCoyote, Aug 25, 2011 @ 11:01 AM.

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