Jump to content

Awake: Sliding Doors, Tragic Edition


  • Please log in to reply

1037 replies to this topic

#751

Irlandesa

Irlandesa

    Fanatic

Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 1:04 AM

What struck me as odd was that a girl from a progressively parented family would choose to continue the pregnancy -- considering that pregnancy is pretty frightening to most teenage girls. But mileage varies etc.


Maybe she didn't continue the pregnancy in the Rex is Alive world. Rex said she had a miscarriage but since she hid the pregnancy from Rex, it's possible she chose to end the pregnancy but fudged on the details letting him believe it was a miscarriage. At that age, a pregnancy is heavy enough but explaining to a boyfriend that you opted to terminate it would potentially make the situation messier. However, if Rex was dead, I agree with Princess Aldrea that it may make Emma reconsider.
  • 1

#752

peeayebee

peeayebee

    Stalker

Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 12:49 PM

Did we get a glimpse of how pregnant the girl seems to be?

I'm pretty sure she doesn't look even vaguely pregnant if her parents don't know yet.

Plus, doesn't she say, "How did you know?"

Considering the character is in an altered state of awareness without visible signs of dementia, I'd say it could be anything from two to four weeks after the accident.

Are you saying that neither world is real? I was thinking that months had passed since no one has any physical scars, and all family members seem to have forgotten about the accident. I've never lost a loved one suddenly like that, so I'm not sure how I'd be acting a month afterwards. Seems like it would take longer to get over than when someone's death is anticipated.
  • 0

#753

Princess Aldrea

Princess Aldrea

    Stalker

Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 3:48 PM

I was thinking that months had passed since no one has any physical scars, and all family members seem to have forgotten about the accident.

I don't think anyone has forgotten about the accident. Rex keeps angsting because of his dead mom and Hannah is insisting on moving to Oregon because she can't bear to stay and be reminded of Rex everywhere. Michael is having the easiest time with the accident, ironically, because he's the one who handled it the worst and won't admit which person is dead. Some people don't show right away when they're pregnant but I don't think Michael could have gotten back to work and then dealt with so many cases so quickly so for me it's been two or three months since the accident.
  • 0

#754

grimm2

grimm2

    Video Archivist

Posted Apr 30, 2012 @ 1:09 AM

Considering the character is in an altered state of awareness without visible signs of dementia, I'd say it could be anything from two to four weeks after the accident.

Are you saying that neither world is real?

I'm saying the protagonist operates as if both dream state and actual reality were real: there's no God complex, no illusion he could tamper with the laws of nature or the smallest hint that he could be able to wake up if things go wrong. He only uses some clues he works with in the dream state to solves his cases in the reality.

Since the logical process isn't compromised and Michael is still in control of his cognotive functions, I believe it can't be more than 4 weeks nor less than 2 weeks after the accident.

Edited by grimm2, Apr 30, 2012 @ 1:11 AM.

  • 0

#755

fauntleroy

fauntleroy

    Couch Potato

Posted Apr 30, 2012 @ 7:03 AM

Since the logical process isn't compromised and Michael is still in control of his cognitive functions...

As has been discussed upthread, the fact that Britten lacks the mother of all cognitive functions, namely the ability to distinguish dream from reality, means he is by definition psychotic. Admitting that to both psychiatrists should have gotten him off duty immediately. He shouldn't even be at work, much less on duty and carrying a gun.

I guess the psychiatrists are progressive too--as long as he is honest with them, they can ignore policy and trust him to do the right thing ha.

As for the time line, since all three characters in the accident appear to have recovered fully and are functioning normally (and assuming at least two of them are real), and that Britten has been involved in solving at least half a dozen cases by now, I'd say it was closer to six months since the accident. But I'd take three months for artistic license, which means he has been preposterously busy at work considering his recent trauma, but which allows the timing of Emma's pregnancy to be just at the limit. Maybe in the red state Emma's parents aren't so "progressive", and she could get away with wearing baggy sweaters. She did seem pretty chipper at the schoolyard for being pregnant and not letting anyone know, or having anyone apparently notice.

Edited by fauntleroy, Apr 30, 2012 @ 9:15 AM.

  • 0

#756

neplusultra

neplusultra

    Couch Potato

Posted May 2, 2012 @ 1:56 AM

Good episode, although I've got to go with fauntleroy a bit in terms of saying that the reveal at the end, combined with other things we've discussed in past episodes, pretty much officially makes the stated premise of the show impossible. Yet I forgive them for it and just enjoy the ride, despite the fact that I'm generally more nitpicky about that kind of thing. Is it because I know the show is canceled? Maybe...not sure if that's why or not.

I did think everyone had been acting like longer had passed since the accident. Yet the son's girlfriend still looked thin, not noticeably pregnant or even ambiguous (like if she just looked a little heavier at least). So that's kinda weird.

I always thought the sympathetic tennis coach was a bit too convenient in Green, too, but they seem to have agreed on that score and written her out.

I didn't mind her character, but it sure does look like you're right that they wrote her out. I wonder if that was one of the decisions made when they stopped production for a while to hammer out the show's direction? It also seems like they have been featuring the family members less in general, which I'm not sure is a great move though I still enjoy it so I guess it's not hurting too bad.

What struck me as odd was that a girl from a progressively parented family would choose to continue the pregnancy

I've mentioned that I identify as a progressive parent, so let me tackle this one (although I can't claim to speak for all progressive parents by any means). For me at least, I think I'd be more accepting of my daughter being pregnant than would a dad who had more traditional moral values. I don't consider such a girl to be "fallen", and I wouldn't consider her baby (my grandchild) to be "illegitimate". Now it's true that being progressive usually goes along with supporting abortion rights. But if my daughter were pregnant, I would encourage her to have the baby, and help raise my grandchild so as to help my daughter be able to continue to be a top student in school as she is now, go on to college, etc. If she chose to have an abortion, I wouldn't shame her about it and I would support her choice...but if her mind wasn't made up, I would gently encourage her not to go the abortion route, nor would I want her to give the baby up for adoption.

I'd say it could be anything from two to four weeks after the accident.


I think it's got to be at least a couple months. Until the pregnancy reveal, I thought we were up to more like six months at least, but even now in my opinion two to four weeks is still too little (and we can add in the fact that women rarely know they are pregnant that quickly). [snip]

I've never lost a loved one suddenly like that, so I'm not sure how I'd be acting a month afterwards. Seems like it would take longer to get over than when someone's death is anticipated.

I lost my father suddenly when I was fifteen. There are times to this day, decades later, that it still hurts a LOT. Yet it was also true that within days after it happened, I was goofing around with friends in ways that took my mind off it (and my sister the same). Some people go totally into a catatonic state or close to it, or at least a consistently melancholy mode 24/7 and maintain that for weeks or months, but I think most people seek to kind of go back into the light and rejoin the world of the living pretty quickly. Then you can have your moments, especially when lying awake in bed or whatever, that you really grieve and have tears pouring down your face, but the rest of the time you can still function in the world, maintain your social relationships, and cheer yourself up so you don't just want to kill yourself or something. YMMV but that is my experience FWIW.

Edited by TWoP Howard, May 3, 2012 @ 8:19 PM.
Boards on boards, manners

  • 0

#757

grimm2

grimm2

    Video Archivist

Posted May 2, 2012 @ 9:55 PM

I'm saying the protagonist operates as if both dream state and actual reality were real: there's no God complex, no illusion he could tamper with the laws of nature or the smallest hint that he could be able to wake up if things go wrong. He only uses some clues he works with in the dream state to solves his cases in the reality.

Since the logical process isn't compromised and Michael is still in control of his cognotive functions, I believe it can't be more than 4 weeks nor less than 2 weeks after the accident.

As has been discussed upthread, the fact that Britten lacks the mother of all cognitive functions, namely the ability to distinguish dream from reality...

I mean cognitive functions as is any mental process that involves symbolic operations like memory and thinking. If the subject were in an altered state of awareness for more than 4 weeks, then either one or all of the above should be compromised in such way he couldn't function as a detective.

*ETA:

Reading more from you downthread, grimm2, it appears you make this estimation based on what I'd call an overly picky evaluation of what kind of mental state he'd have to be in based on the premise

Actually, I'm making an assessment based on the protanist's symptoms: if it were more than a month, then his sense of time within the dream state should be altered enough for the audience to perceive which state is the reality; if it were more than two months since the accident, then the subject himself should be in a coma in order to be plausible.

Edited by grimm2, May 2, 2012 @ 10:08 PM.

  • 0

#758

fauntleroy

fauntleroy

    Couch Potato

Posted May 3, 2012 @ 12:41 PM

if it were more than a month, then his sense of time within the dream state should be altered enough for the audience to perceive which state is the reality; if it were more than two months since the accident, then the subject himself should be in a coma in order to be plausible

Why a month? Why not six months, or a year? We the audience only get glimpses of what is going on. We only get to see what the director and writers choose to show us. The whole thing is unreliable--Britten doesn't know what is happening, and neither do we. He could be a brain in a bottle, or two consciousnesses each in its own 10-terabyte storage, that share a "Britten" memory stored separately. He could be an alien plugged into a guy in a coma. He could be twins, he could be in alternate realities a la Fringe.

I had hoped for internal consistency, but thought the premise as stated, which was that it wasn't sci-fi (ie, none of the above), it was simply a guy in one reality and dreaming an apparent reality, could not be internally consistent, by definition. (Unless Britten can repeatedly have accurate meaningful dreams about the future, which meant he was psychic, not part of the premise.)

Given that though, like neplusultra I've sort of given up on caring about consistency once it became apparent the writers were more interested in the personal drama than in explaining their way out of the logical hole they dug. Too bad. Still it's worth watching I think.

Another beef though is that it's too gloomy. What's the best possible outcome? His son is dead, or his wife is dead? Gee what a fun season/series finale to look forward to, when we get to find out which form his misery takes in reality.

Edited by fauntleroy, May 3, 2012 @ 12:43 PM.

  • 0

#759

grimm2

grimm2

    Video Archivist

Posted May 3, 2012 @ 12:48 PM

Actually, I'm making an assessment based on the protanist's symptoms: if it were more than a month, then his sense of time within the dream state should be altered enough for the audience to perceive which state is the reality; if it were more than two months since the accident, then the subject himself should be in a coma in order to be plausible.

Why a month? Why not six months, or a year? ...

Because the brain can't sustain such a state for more than a month without the subconscious breaking the rules of nature. In pop culture language, think about Inception, the Matrix or Donnie Darko: the conscience fights to be awaken, even if it has to fight against the will of the subject.

Edited by grimm2, May 3, 2012 @ 12:51 PM.

  • 0

#760

fauntleroy

fauntleroy

    Couch Potato

Posted May 3, 2012 @ 1:56 PM

Because the brain can't sustain such a state for more than a month without the subconscious breaking the rules of nature.

That's a new one on me, do you have a (plausible) source? For all we know Britten's brain may be special. Or his subconscious has been breaking the rules of nature and we just haven't been privy to those occasions. I'd say accurate premonitions would qualify. And what was up with that penguin? This misses the point though. Arguing about plausibility here is akin to trying to figure out how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. You can't on the one hand accept the fantastical premise and on the other hand limit it to a month.

Well, I suppose you can, but it's pretty arbitrary. It's like, I was with this show, right up until the penguin--no way would there be a penguin!
  • 0

#761

TWoP Howard

TWoP Howard

    TWoP Moderator

Posted May 3, 2012 @ 8:22 PM

Let it drop, people. We have a rule against repetitive posting. You’ve all made your point several times over, so move on.

#762

ottergreen

ottergreen

    Fanatic

Posted May 3, 2012 @ 11:08 PM

Can someone explain the situation with the police chief? At first I got the impression that this mysterious stranger she keeps talking to not only caused the crash but had also caused Michael's "Two Worlds" syndrome, like the crash was orchestrated to send him into an alternate universe...

(People are saying "this world's real, the other's a dream" but I think it's more science fictiony than that-- they're both real, and they're parallel universes.)

But on tonight's episode the police chief was talking to the mysterious stranger about heroin or cocaine. She was in cahoots with him for whatever reason, and they were trying to get rid of Michael because he had been investigating the heroin case.

Did they try to retcon this? Is the fact that the crash was apparently not an accident unrelated to Michael's "Two Worlds" switchiness? I was kind of hoping the police chief and the mysterious stranger were puppet masters who send people to and fro between universes, and that they had messed up this time.

Also, is the police chief only acting shady in one of the worlds?
  • 0

#763

Cardie

Cardie

    Fanatic

Posted May 3, 2012 @ 11:59 PM

There has been nothing to indicate that the mysterious stranger is anyone but some sort of crook with whom the corrupt Captain Harper is in cahoots in Red world; we've seen no indication that she is corrupt in Green. It looks now like he is or works for this drug kingpin Trujillo whom Michael had been making a case against for years. I assume he engineered the car crash to try to get Michael out of the way and the two worlds came from the aftermath of the "accident."
  • 0

#764

Rickster

Rickster

    Fanatic

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 8:51 AM

To me, the girlfriend seemed considerably more pregnant in this episode than the last one.
  • 0

#765

kiki38

kiki38

    Couch Potato

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 9:03 AM

I like this show, but I'm leaning towards it's shelf life being very short. Just seems too complex to maintain for several years or longer, and the inconsistencies will mount the longer this goes, so they will likely lose viewers.

So is the girlfriend going to live with them, or are they just going to outright adopt the kid? Not sure which way they are going with this.

I maintain that neither world is real, and Michael is in a coma, drifting between two realities that exist only in his comatose brain. Perhaps visits from the wife/son are what causes his worlds to 'switch'?
  • 0

#766

jenniferes

jenniferes

    Fanatic

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 10:44 AM

With each passing episode, I get more attached to both worlds and the thought of losing one becomes a painful proposition. I hope they are able to resolve this in a way that provides some sort of explanation. Even if it is not consistent with real life, I just care that it's consistent within the narrative world we're watching. I worry the show is going to be cancelled and we're going to be left hanging.

I think if we look at the last episode, we did not actually see a shot of the girlfriend below about shoulder level, so I think they're covered with regards to the five months and baby bump. I'll have to rewatch to double check.

I had a slightly harder time figuring out the clues this time and how they (the clues) crossed back and forth between universes. One time he was looking at a suspect folder and I couldn't figure out what the trigger was. I watched on Hulu on a treadmill, so maybe I was winded (ha! I only walk, no excuse there). I did immediately suspect the landlord, though. I think that even if the criminals are telegraphed, the interest is in how Michael is able to use clues across worlds to solve the case; a sort of puzzling it out intrigue vs. a who-done-it intrigue.

I, too, am under the impression that the bad guy in the red world caused the accident to get rid of Britten, but does not control the dream states. He seems to just want Britten gone and he doesn't have any characteristics of being an evil scientist. That could be a miscue, though.

Edited by jenniferes, May 4, 2012 @ 10:47 AM.

  • 0

#767

Cardie

Cardie

    Fanatic

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 10:56 AM

The clue that crossed worlds was the house where the drug bust in Red occurred. It looked very much like the house on the cover of the "Crime Spree" video game. By checking out the video game and talking to the fellow player in Sweden, Michael was able to determine when the young black guy was killed and to realize that he was killed after the old lady, not before.

This episode made very little use of the two worlds premise though. All the personal stuff was in Red while the case of the week was in Green, with nary a mention of or appearance by Rex. No therapy sessions either. It was very close in its effect to a standard procedural in which the cop balances home and professional life.
  • 0

#768

pl86

pl86

    Video Archivist

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 11:10 AM

I think the police work is the weakest part of the show. There's too much signposting going on and the pattern of solving the crime is the same. You know that whatever Britten's partners think is going to be wrong. Both Vega and Freeman always jump to the wrong conclusion so I always know to discount their opinions. It's basically like Castle where the first two or three people that they accuse of the crime is invariably innocent.

The writers can also get too cute. Last night's episode, I knew within five minutes of the show who killed whom and why because the writers dropped massive anvils in the script. Obvious Clue #1 was when they're inspecting the crime scene and Britten asks where the drugs are and his partner Freeman basically shrugs his shoulder. Any time a character poses a question and it's dealt with in a perfunctory way, you know it's important. Obvious Clue #2 was Freeman declaring that the elderly woman was killed for being at the wrong place, wrong time after the young man was murdered. Freeman is always wrong so you know to take this crime scene narrative with a grain of salt. The final clue was when the landlord showed up and he started talking about how Mrs. King had lived there forever before he bought the building, how he tried to get her to leave but she refused and how he had moved out....(connect the dots). He might as well signed a confession when he closed with "She had faith in the community. I'm sorry she was so wrong." This two bit landlord fancies himself a Keyser Söze-like figure who delights in dropping teasing, ironic insinuations of his own guilt in front of the police? That line was the writers being too clever by a half and substituting their own voice in place of the character's.

As for whether one or both worlds are real, Jason Isaacs was interviewed for BBC's Front Row radio program this week since the show is starting to air in the UK and he gives a definitive answer to that question.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...rammes/b01gvryb

Edited by pl86, May 4, 2012 @ 12:14 PM.

  • 0

#769

PhPhan

PhPhan

    Fanatic

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 12:30 PM

http://www.nbc.com/a...sives/timeline/

The producers of this show have a timeline. This last show was week 28. Which I'm not sure makes any sense if Emma is only five months pregnant.
  • 0

#770

benteen

benteen

    Stalker

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 12:39 PM

Yeah, that would make her seven months pregnant.

Good episode last night although I agree, the premise really doesn't have a long shelf life.

Obviously things are working themselves out with the girl and I can understand the closed pregnancy thing but if Britten and Hannah wanted to raise the baby, why the hell not give it to them in the first place?
  • 0

#771

peeayebee

peeayebee

    Stalker

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 3:43 PM

I can understand the closed pregnancy thing but if Britten and Hannah wanted to raise the baby, why the hell not give it to them in the first place?

I think the parents said something about Emma needing closure, so the closed pregnancy would be best. It would be like erasing the child from her life. Whereas if the baby were given to the Brittens, Emma would always know where the baby was, even if the moved to Portland. Giving the baby away without knowing anything about its whereabouts is like sending it into the ether.

I think the police work is the weakest part of the show. There's too much signposting going on and the pattern of solving the crime is the same.

pl86, could you explain what "signposting" means? I think I get the gist of it from the rest of your post, which I agree with, except I missed that the landlord was guilty. I immediately knew the woman was the real target because of all the details we were getting and the time spent in her apartment. Maybe I missed the signposts (?) about the landlord because I was focused on things in the woman's room, like the urn right behind Freeman with either her son's or husband's ashes in it. Also, I thought that somehow SHE was a drug dealer, esp when the lady in the nursing home said that the boys on the corner showed her respect.

Anyway, I'm glad the reveal that she was the primary target happened about halfway thru the show and not at the very end.

The junkie/hit man reminded me of Edward Norton Jr.

I keep noticing numbers. When this series started, numbers seemed very important, or at least as important as Lost's famous numbers. I remember one ep (the second?) where Britten and his partner were standing right in front of a market or restaurant, and the lunch special was painted on the building in huge type. In this ep when he and Freeman are standing outside a building, right behind Britten is the address: 416. Then when he gets the perp's address from the pawnshop, he says it aloud: 2642 something street. It doesn't seem like we need to hear the numbers or see them displayed so prominently on screen, so I keep thinking there's a point to this.

I wasn't too thrilled with this ep. Not enough psychology. But next week's looks great.
  • 0

#772

rory

rory

    Couch Potato

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 4:02 PM

I think I just don't like the pregnancy storyline. It feels like something that was tagged on because the writers figured the show'd be cancelled. I don't believe that 2 college bound 15 year olds would have been so careless as to not have used protection(as Rex said last week they didn't). Is also inconsistent with what we saw of the girlfriend in the penguin episode in Rexalive universe, she didn't act like someone who had already suffered a miscarriage, was too upbeat then, and then in a later episode she's a mess?
  • 0

#773

basiltherat

basiltherat

    Couch Potato

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 4:26 PM

To some reality, if the Brittens wanted to, they could go to court and ask for custody of Emma and Rex's baby. And shame on the "progressive" parents for not even telling the Brittens about the pregnancy.

Was there a hint of a past, ahem, relationhip between Britten and the redheaded captain?
  • 0

#774

PhPhan

PhPhan

    Fanatic

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 5:11 PM

[font=Verdana, Helvetica, Arial,]

To some reality, if the Brittens wanted to, they could go to court and ask for custody of Emma and Rex's baby. And shame on the "progressive" parents for not even telling the Brittens about the pregnancy.

[/font]
[font="Verdana, Helvetica, Arial,"][size="2"]
[/size][/font]
[font="Verdana, Helvetica, Arial,"][size="2"]
[/size][/font]
[font=Verdana, Helvetica, Arial,]I agree. Grandparents do have rights. That whole scene with the parents seemed really cold. Not only did the parents want the daughter to give up a baby in a closed adoption, they were assholes to the fact that this was a connection to the Britten's dead son. I'm not even sure what this progressive parenting means other than "We'll let you mess around all you want, but if you get knocked up, you're out of here". They came off more repressive than progressive. [/font]
  • 0

#775

shapeshifter

shapeshifter

    Fanatic

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 7:07 PM

Grandparents do have rights.

That's what I was thinking, but then it all got resolved before I could bother to look up state and federal laws and regulations and whatnot.


I guess because I've been a renter for for 40 years I immediately figured the landlord was the perp and why. The rest of the clues escaped me.


There are a lot of new and old shows that I've recently deleted from my TV schedule spreadsheet, but this isn't one of them. With only three episodes left, if it's canceled, I'm guessing TPTB must've seen some real ratings killer episodes in the last three.
  • 0

#776

fauntleroy

fauntleroy

    Couch Potato

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 7:20 PM

the pattern of solving the crime is the same. You know that whatever Britten's partners think is going to be wrong. Both Vega and Freeman always jump to the wrong conclusion so I always know to discount their opinions.

Ha that is a good point. They have to be wrong, for Britten to be right. And Britten has to be right, otherwise the premise that he gets to exploit info across the states would be moot. The whole point is that the dual states provide him with insight that regular old single-state inhabitants don't have. Being 100% wrong all the time sucks for Vega and Freeman. Too bad as I like them both as characters.

I assume he engineered the car crash to try to get Michael out of the way and the two worlds came from the aftermath of the "accident."

Yes. There was a remark in the preview for the next episode, something to that effect. And also "both are dreams"? I didn't quite catch it. It's a bit disappointing that hooknose is just a regular criminal, not a scientist from the future or whatnot. I guess this means the source of Britten's condition won't be explained beyond a bump on the head.

I avoided betting on the real state earlier but this last episode seems like it's leaning heavily to red/wife alive. The whole pregnancy plot seems too elaborate to be a mere figment. And next week he stops waking up in green apparently. At least for a while.

The initial dead drug dealer--his record was four counts of possession of pot with intent to distribute? Pot, really?
  • 0

#777

Princess Aldrea

Princess Aldrea

    Stalker

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 8:56 PM

To some reality, if the Brittens wanted to, they could go to court and ask for custody of Emma and Rex's baby. And shame on the "progressive" parents for not even telling the Brittens about the pregnancy.

I hope that's the case IRL. I mean, if custody goes to the mother and then the mother's parents first then that's one thing but it would be terrible for the mother's family to decide to give the baby up for adoption and the perfectly suitable family of the father can have nothing to do with the child.

I don't see why the "progressive parents" are so against the Brittons raising the baby, especially if they had moved to Oregon. Yes, Emma would have always known but she wouldn't have to make any of the sacrifics that comes from being a teenage mom. Since the child is the Brittons' only link to Rex and Emma is so young, they'd be perfectly understanding and let Emma be a part of their adopted child's life. They might not be so understanding if a few years down the road when her life is settled she wanted the kid back but by the time she's settled why would her parents be opposed to that?

Edited by Princess Aldrea, May 5, 2012 @ 1:32 PM.

  • 0

#778

GreenPhoenix

GreenPhoenix

    Fanatic

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 10:22 PM

Thanks for the link to the interview, pl86. I really liked the part when he described people coming up to him on the streets. If I ever ran into him, I'd probably cheerfully proclaim that his son is dead, too (and that I wished it was his wife who died).
  • 0

#779

ouronlylight

ouronlylight

    Couch Potato

Posted May 4, 2012 @ 10:37 PM

The timeline in this episode was all screwed up. If Vega replaced Bird in the red reality after the accident, how is it that Emma is only five months pregnant (even though, as someone noted above, 28 weeks is far longer than five months) while Vega and Britten have been partners for six?
  • 0

#780

fauntleroy

fauntleroy

    Couch Potato

Posted May 5, 2012 @ 9:29 AM

Fudging the timeline by a couple of months to tie things up sooner than originally planned is a fair price to pay I think. If indeed wife is alive, they could move to Portland with their grandchild, and support young Emma however she needs, that's a pretty nice (ie the least gloomy) outcome actually. Making hooknose and captain just about common crime rather than some X Files-type conspiracy is clever--they can then deal with them in one procedural episode. That will only leave explaining how the whole thing happened in the first place. Bump on the head in the crash? That'll be disappointing, though something has to give as the result of a last-minute rewrite.

Come to think of it, I wonder if the X Files shoutout had some significance.

Thanks by the way pl86. I didn't have the patience to listen to the whole interview which might render the above all wrong. I should try again.
  • 0