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#31

NYdreaming

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Posted May 27, 2011 @ 7:51 AM

ITA - they could easily condense the dream property, two home options and plans/selection segments, i.e. the real estate segments, from 4 to 2. Don't they present the plans as they tour anyway? Plus, HGTV already airs at least two HH clones - PV and MFP.

This week's episode seemed slightly better. They did the entire house because the homeowner's friends and family pitched-in. The reno segments felt longer and the end result looked like a complete, professional job instead of patchwork.

Edited by NYdreaming, May 27, 2011 @ 8:30 AM.

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#32

Imonrey

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Posted Jun 2, 2011 @ 2:12 PM

I'm kind of fascinated with this show - for now. I like the brothers, I think they're gorgeous. If not for the hair they'd be identical, they look that much alike facially. I wonder if they made one of them change their hair so we could tell them apart.

I like that the properties they show their clients are disaster areas. You almost never see that on HH or PV or MFP. The ones they showed last night were total gut jobs. One of the houses was filled with crap from floor to ceiling, it would be impossible to see the potential. I like the massive transformations they go through although I do feel cheated by the fact that they obviously do not remodel the entire house.

The one part they could drop would be where they show the couple their dream home first so they can see what they can't afford. That seems like a waste of time. They could either show them three potential properties they can afford, or else spend more time showing the reno and reveal.
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#33

CrowdedBackyard

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Posted Jun 2, 2011 @ 7:32 PM

I like that the properties they show their clients are disaster areas.


Now, see, I feel this is the fakest part of the show. Some of the mess is just so far over the top; garbage spilling out of bags, a half of sandwich artfully teetering on a ledge, clothing tossed about, furniture tipped and askew, tripping hazards everywhere, etc. It is as if the places have been searched by the police. If we are to believe that these houses are for sale, there is no way a real estate agent would allow them to be shown in, what often appears to be, a potential hazardous state. One misstep by a potential buyer resulting in injury and they'd own not only the house but the real estate firm (I exaggerate a bit). Yes, I know that there are houses out there like that, but they are usually the type that are sold at auction and you can't get in to take a look until you are the successful bidder.
It all smacks of some reverse staging on the part of production to amp up the buyers' angst and to make the before and after appear even a bigger accomplishment.
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#34

NYdreaming

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Posted Jun 3, 2011 @ 8:07 AM

We're on the same page, CrowdedBackyard. Someone actually asked this week while we watched, "Do you think they purposely mess these places up for filming?" Too staged for us -

Edited by NYdreaming, Jun 3, 2011 @ 8:10 AM.

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#35

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Posted Jun 5, 2011 @ 4:53 PM

I like the brothers, I think they're gorgeous.

Now for me, I found them kind of creepy looking and that's why I stopped watching.

I'm sure the messes are staged, just like "Clean Sweep" -- there's no way people lived in that much clutter.
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#36

Bitterswete

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Posted Jun 6, 2011 @ 10:50 AM

I'm sure the messes are staged, just like "Clean Sweep" -- there's no way people lived in that much clutter.


People definitely live in that kind of clutter. I've seen it personally many times. Not to say that some staging doesn't sometimes go on for TV shows. But no matter how bad something looks on TV, I can guarantee there's someone living in the same conditions, or worse, in real life.
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#37

NYdreaming

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Posted Jun 6, 2011 @ 4:54 PM

Agreed, many people live in clutter but would they attempt to sell their home that way? In addition, would their realtor, a professional, allow a home to be shown in that state? On national/international television? Ok, possibly if every home on PB is in foreclosure.

To the realtor, the home represents an item of inventory - any professional presents inventory in the best way possible. Many realtors routinely complain that they end up providing cleaning services to their clients by performing light chores before open houses or showings. They also routinely recommend cleaning services, gardeners and/or stagers to get the home, a very expensive item of inventory, in selling condition.

In addition, in the extreme, a homeowner and/or realtor might have liability if visitors injured themselves tripping over clutter. IIRC, the previous thread comments referred to the home as an item of inventory, not simply ongoing, cluttered living conditions.

Edited by NYdreaming, Jun 6, 2011 @ 5:01 PM.

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#38

Bitterswete

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Posted Jun 6, 2011 @ 5:06 PM

Agreed, many people live in clutter but would they attempt to sell their home that way? In addition, would their realtor allow a home to be shown in that state?


You'd be surprised. I remember in the Get It Sold thread, posters talking about going to open houses and seeing clutter everywhere, sinks piled high with dirty dishes, even one place with ants crawling all over the place. And on Buy Me (a much beloved show about people trying to sell their homes) their were plenty of sellers who put their clutter-filled houses on the market...and on TV. In one classic episode, the real estate agent (can't remember his name) was constantly battling with the seller to get rid of some of the crap packed into her home. You should go to that thread and search for "Mimi." Just reading about that episode is fascinating.

But, again, that's not to say their isn't plenty of staging going on on Property Brothers. From what I've seen of the show so far, it wouldn't surprise me all that much.

Edited by Bitterswete, Jun 6, 2011 @ 5:20 PM.

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#39

jeanine0123

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Posted Jun 6, 2011 @ 5:58 PM

Agreed, many people live in clutter but would they attempt to sell their home that way? In addition, would their realtor, a professional, allow a home to be shown in that state?


Yes they do. The folks we bought our home from did. Not quite to the point of some of the dumps I saw on Property Brothers but pretty damned near. They just had way, way too much stuff. Of course, we weren't on a television show but still.

The only other time I saw a house in the state ours was when we looked at it was when I moved in with my boyfriend who was sharing his house with three other guys in college. Bachelor pad of guys who only cleaned if mom was coming over. And since mom hardly ever came over, the place hardly ever got clean. I swear, the mold was the only thing holding up the bathroom ceiling in that house.
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#40

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Posted Jun 6, 2011 @ 6:56 PM

Understood and nothing would surprise me. I've seen scores, actually thousands, of homes in these states as a long-time investor but we're talking about realtors promoting their homes on television. Even if PB doesn't air the episode for many months, the home may receive attention at the time from being featured and filmed for HGTV. In fact, many realtors advertise if a home was featured in their listing comments.

We're not talking about routine, ongoing real estate listings. BTW, the Buy Me and GIS homes may have been set-up also because they addressed problem sales situations. ETA: IIRC, DTS participants indicated they were instructed to leave messes for the realtors.

Edited by NYdreaming, Jun 6, 2011 @ 9:48 PM.

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#41

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Posted Jun 10, 2011 @ 9:13 AM

Anyone else wondering how this week's couple with the newborn twins planned on redoing the balance of that 7,000 s.f. house, including the kitchen? Can't remember their budget but hope they had enough $$$ leftover to complete it, including that scary kitchen.

Loved the midcentury den - too bad they only removed part of that bulkhead. At least the brothers gave them a good start.
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#42

MethodActor05

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Posted Jun 10, 2011 @ 5:22 PM

Both brothers are hot though Jonathan has too much of a 90s look going on. Wonder if it is for the show (they look to be identical so something to differentiate between them) or if it's his style.


I kept thinking, "Hey, Jonathan, the 90's called and they want their blond highlights and surfer boy hairstyle back." He would look so much better with natural colored hair and a more modern hairstyle.

I think the guys are cute so I'll watch when it's on.

Edited by MethodActor05, Jun 10, 2011 @ 5:23 PM.

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#43

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Posted Jun 10, 2011 @ 6:40 PM

Writing show comments but keep seeing "they're so hot". The wardrobe's a little prescious to me - Not my type, but that's o.k. -

BTW, agree on the highlights and surfer boy style. They don't look identical to me. (re: someone said "twins" earlier)

Have a great weekend, everyone - look out for aging-surfer-contractor dudes that do magic on the side!

Edited by NYdreaming, Jun 10, 2011 @ 6:49 PM.

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#44

Imonrey

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Posted Jun 15, 2011 @ 1:27 PM

Agreed, many people live in clutter but would they attempt to sell their home that way? In addition, would their realtor, a professional, allow a home to be shown in that state? On national/international television? Ok, possibly if every home on PB is in foreclosure.

It's possible. It's also possible - actually, probable - the show reaches out to large real estate companies looking specifically for abandoned homes in need of remodeling, given the nature of the show. Depending on the market, there may be a glut of homes in sorry states the realtors simply don't care very much about. Remember, the homes they are showing are considered "cheap" by their market standards. A lot of realtors don't want to be bothered with homes under a certain price point. If every home they showed was filled with clutter, dirt and trash I'd find it more suspicious, but a lot of the time the homes are simply empty, so I'm willing to believe these homes are the real deal.
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#45

NYdreaming

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Posted Jun 15, 2011 @ 7:35 PM

ITA - I reconsidered after remembering how many filthy places I've toured over the years. Initially, because of my background, it was abhorrent to me that any professional would allow their inventory to be filmed on national television (ok. int'l) in that state.

Edited by NYdreaming, Jun 15, 2011 @ 7:36 PM.

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#46

CrowdedBackyard

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Posted Jun 16, 2011 @ 1:40 AM

Now for me, I found them kind of creepy looking and that's why I stopped watching.


Agreed! For me they look like the human versions of Sid the Sloth from the Ice Age movies. Hopefully if there is a second season they will tighten up the pacing of the show.
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#47

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Posted Jun 16, 2011 @ 8:27 AM

I just watched an hour show that was originally on in Jan. The kitchen was a real nightmare. The arrangement was horrid. They didn't even show what they did to that kitchen. The bath with the horrid maroon fixtures was bad but usable. The kitchen wasn't. So show us the hard expensive stuff not some furniture you bought for the place. Not sure I will be watching this show much.
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#48

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Posted Jun 16, 2011 @ 9:12 AM

IIRC, that was the first episode and it's been my main problem all along. They show us a 7,000 s.f. trashed home (like last week), talk about the buyers' tight financial situation but only renovate 3 rooms or so. The fact that they skipped that kitchen on the first episode put them immediately on the wrong foot in our household. (like they care, haha)
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#49

Imonrey

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Posted Jun 16, 2011 @ 11:52 AM

I saw that hour long show too. I like the format much better. For one thing, they show that the couple actually does look at more than just two houses. They just narrow it down to two choices eventually. They also show a lot more of the renovation work.

What still kind of bugs me though is how the prospective buyers turn their noses up at cosmetic things like carpeting and paint color. I mean, they know what kind of show they're on and what the deal is: to buy a fixer-upper. So they have to go into a house trying to focus on the basic layout and potential. It's one thing to say "there are only three bedrooms, we really need four" but "this house is so dated and needs too much work" is in idiotic thing to say when you're on a show with a professional (?) contractor (/magician) who is along specifically to removel for you. It's just so fake.
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#50

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Posted Jun 16, 2011 @ 11:41 PM

If I were touring a 7,000 s.f. home and pregnant with twins (like last week's participants), I'd be very concerned with the totality of the home renovation, since my contractor/magician's apparently only doing 3 or 4 rooms. (In fact, the PB didn't even do the kitchen for the expecting couple, even though it was a wreck.)

Edited by NYdreaming, Jun 17, 2011 @ 5:57 AM.

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#51

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Posted Jun 27, 2011 @ 2:30 PM

I've caught a couple of episodes of this show. The thing that gets me with the people is they are so surprised that there dream home is way outside of their budget. It's like haven't they been looking at the market, going to open houses, something? How do you not know what you can afford? This is a pet peeve that I have with a lot of shows.

I don't find the brothers creepy looking. It's weird looking at them though. I think it's the twin thing for some reason with me.

I have no problem with the format of the show. I don't have a problem with them only doing certain rooms in the house. Of the shows I've seen, the couple never have enough $ to do the whole house. As long as they do the rooms the homeowners want done, I'm all good.

The last one I saw had the engaged couple who wanted a house before the big day. The bride-to-be's father was going to be living in the basement and they do a lot of entertaining. They chose the first house, which I wouldn't have chosen. The first house didn't have a bathroom in the basement so they would have to put one in since the house only had 1 on the main level. The second house was smaller in square footage but Jonathan's plan accounted for that. If they went with his plan, they would've had entertaining space inside. It also had a big backyard, not as big as the first but big enough for their needs. And they wouldn't have maxed their budget therefore, they would've had money to fix up other rooms in the house, like the only other bathroom. So not my choice but I'm hoping they are enjoying their new home and making it work.
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#52

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Posted Jun 28, 2011 @ 5:25 PM

Jasprit irritated the hell out of me. Totally high maintenance. But that 5 story row house made me salivate. And I'm completely jealous.
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#53

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Posted Jun 30, 2011 @ 4:04 AM

I swear, it's like the 2008 crash never happened in Toronto. I can't believe people paying 460k on houses in such bad shape.
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#54

NYdreaming

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Posted Jun 30, 2011 @ 2:14 PM

Everyone notice they're airing expanded versions with the same families these past two weeks and calling them "New" episodes? Haven't watched them. Don't know if it's worth my time. To anyone who's seen both: does the expanded version improve PB significantly?
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#55

Imonrey

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Posted Jun 30, 2011 @ 2:24 PM

I guess I didn't notice the hour-long versions were just expanded versions of the half hour shows. I did catch another hour long version last night.

Yes, I think it's better as an hour-long show. Maybe they realized that after a couple of episodes. The whole concept of this show is a cross between House Hunters and Income Property, basically. So half is devoted to finding a house and half is devoted to fixing a house. Trying to cover all that in 22 minutes (or whatever it is without commercials) is a challenge. The one I saw last night had a couple with an Asian husband who was kind of a perfectionist and they showed Jonathan rolling his eyes at the camera while the guy was complaining about something.

I think the main thing I like about this show is that it's nice to see a lot of fixer-uppers and try to imagine their potential. Too many properties on HH and PV are new builds and they all start looking the same after awhile. I just wish they'd drop the "this is your dream home that you can't afford, now let's go look at run-down homes you can afford" start of the format.

There is maybe too much time spent on the renovations in the hour-long version I guess. Maybe a 45 minute format would be ideal. Last night's couple also took the building inspection contigency out of their offer to insure they got the house they wanted and they ended up paying big time for that. I couldn't believe how foolish they were to do that. That's not even legal in the state where I live, building inspections are required. I can't imagine paying $440k for a house without having a building inspection first and then finding out you just bought a giant money pit.
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#56

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Posted Jun 30, 2011 @ 2:46 PM

I guess I didn't notice the hour-long versions were just expanded versions of the half hour shows. I did catch another hour long version last night.


That's odd! In Canada we were shown the hour long shows first, and now they are showing them as 1/2 hour shows, but I know they are the same episodes, just shortened.

I think the 1/2 hour is too short to show everything. I would like it if they skipped the "dream home" bit too, and maybe looked at a couple more houses instead.

The Asian husband annoyed the crap out of me too. There was also a gay couple I didn't like all that well either; they had to live in the basement of the house during the work and finally went on vacation part way through the reno, because one of them couldn't stand all the upheaval (although the other one had been helping with the reno).
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#57

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Posted Jul 1, 2011 @ 2:53 PM

CrowdedBackyard

Agreed! For me they look like the human versions of Sid the Sloth from the Ice Age movies. Hopefully if there is a second season they will tighten up the pacing of the show.


That is creepily accurate.

I do like the variety that this show offers vs. some of the other "Let's look at houses" shows due to the lack of model homes and new construction. One thing that bugs is the downright whining about how ugly/outdated things are. I grant that the producers might be egging them on but shut up! You're poor*! That's the type of house you get to look at!


*Poor said not seriously at all as our house buying budget was 1/3 to 1/4 the cost of the pre-renovation houses shown.

Edited by monty9, Jul 1, 2011 @ 2:54 PM.

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#58

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Posted Jul 1, 2011 @ 3:35 PM

I think the main thing I like about this show is that it's nice to see a lot of fixer-uppers and try to imagine their potential.

Yes! I love older homes, too, which is why I watch. I think those of us that can see the potential are drawn to this show. I was in love with the Indian couple's 5 level (yum) row house.

Last night's couple also took the building inspection contigency out of their offer to insure they got the house they wanted and they ended up paying big time for that. I couldn't believe how foolish they were to do that.

OMG me too. I thought, "Jesus are you people high?" I laughed when he asked, "Who doesn't get a property inspection on a 100 year old house?" The ones you're standing next to.
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#59

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Posted Jul 1, 2011 @ 5:32 PM

Thanks for the responses, all. Glad to hear the 1 hour format helps - it definitely needed something. So far, I've recognized each couple and IIRC, they're going in order of the season. I was missing the reno portion, too. Always feels like too much of a rehash when I recognize the couple and never sure about investing the time.

Agree, it's absolutely insane to purchase a 100-yr old property without an inspection. In CA, with our disclosure laws and potential realtor liability, I can't even contemplate a realtor ever writing up an offer in that fashion. In extreme cases, dangerous situations can be present and realtors get sued.

I'll have to check out that episode. How did the PB handle that? Here, the realtors (most, IME) compare notes through their local associations and are keenly aware of the dangers.

Thanks, again. Happy 4th, US viewers!
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#60

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Posted Jul 13, 2011 @ 9:53 AM

I think the main thing I like about this show is that it's nice to see a lot of fixer-uppers and try to imagine their potential.

The thing that frustrates me most about this show is that most of the homebuyers (I think a lot of them are first-timers) cannot see the potential of a space at all. Either they have no imagination, or they can't see past the surface (dated, messy, unpleasant or wrongheaded finishes, dirty carpets, yada yada, "where's my double sinks at?"-cakes.) Of course, a third possibility, that the show is edited to make the homebuyer look as mindbogglingly clueless as modern technology allows, exists also.

Was it the episode with the Asian Perfectionist Husband where the guy kept saying "This is old ... this looks dated. More old windows"? Buddy, it's a pre-war house with high ceilings, original woodwork, and frickin' stained glass in those so-called "old windows." I don't begrudge Jonathan a couple of eyerolls. I wanted to slap the guy. Do some people just not understand the concept of character, or was APH Guy just not into anything but the most up-to-date (i.e., soon to be dated) style?

I don't think Property Brothers is the only show where the homebuyer can't tell the difference between dated design and good bones, or between a solid house and a money-pit with fancy surfaces (like that GINORMOUS house with the 80s-style rooms and the avalanche of a fireplace, yikes), but, the concept of finding a fixer-upper to transform into your dreamhouse seems to exacerbate the disconnect between what the homebuyer expects and what they can see (and afford). Good grief, it's a good thing I'm not a realtor, because if my prospective buyers behaved like that, some of those open houses would end up with a few extra skeletons in the closets.

"Oh, and look: here we a view of the spacious backyard, with an extra-large vegetable garden! Planted, well, just yesterday, in fact..."

Edited by Sandman, Jul 14, 2011 @ 10:12 AM.

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