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3-15: "Subject 13" 2011.02.25 (recap)


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#421

DixieGirl

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Posted Sep 9, 2011 @ 3:20 PM

It was either that or "Remember when we said Peter had a high IQ? LOL, we lied". I think the latter is correct, they went to extreme lengths to show how stupid he was.
Have to take issue with this, as there are different types of intelligence



Agreed... and I've always thought that the part of Peter with the 190 IQ wasn't fully engaged during this period of time. Blood loss, and all that.

#422

lizw65

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Posted Sep 9, 2011 @ 3:49 PM

As my SO is fond of saying, there's only enough blood in a young man's body to run one head...or the other.:)

#423

DixieGirl

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Posted Sep 9, 2011 @ 4:49 PM

As my SO is fond of saying, there's only enough blood in a young man's body to run one head...or the other.:)


Exactly what I meant, lizw65.... and it's not limited to young men, either.

#424

Lurkey

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Posted Sep 13, 2011 @ 12:59 PM

As my SO is fond of saying, there's only enough blood in a young man's body to run one head...or the other.:)

Snerk.

There's another dropped thread in the narrative that runs between "Peter" and this episode, and one that I hope will resurface this season: the gap between Olivia being key to Walter's rudimentary plan to return Peter to the redverse, and whatever happened to disrupt the program and cause both Walter AND Olivia to forget. In "Peter," as told by Walter, he couldn't bring himself to save and then surrender this little boy so like his own. In "Subject 13," Peter's recovered but is so demonstrably distressed by the weirdnesses he's noticing that he's losing it; Walter and Elizabeth are lying to him, yes, but out of necessity: they care for this child, and they want to keep him alive (and sane!) long enough to get him home as they've realized they must.

But figuring out how to do that puts Walter in another moral quandary: he wants Olivia to act as Peter's inter-universe transport, but he's discovered that it works best when she's frightened and upset. He toys with the idea of letting evil stepdad continue smacking her around unchecked--it's Elizabeth, again, who calls him on that. At the end of the episode, Walter warns Evil Step (though I imagine that backfired horribly), and to Olivia, he suggests that they try something new, tomorrow. So my question is, what happened "tomorrow"? Or very soon thereafter? I think it must be some combo of Evil Step yanking Olivia out of the program for spite, and/or her home situation worsening until she shot the bastard and was...in some kind of legal limbo? packed off to boarding school as a third-grade would-be murderer? And then...both she AND Walter forgot all this?

Fascinating...to me, anyway. :)

#425

Money Magnet

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Posted Sep 13, 2011 @ 1:04 PM

So my question is, what happened "tomorrow"? Or very soon thereafter?


Walter injected Olivia with Forgetfulness Drugs and then he went nuts and forgot it over 17 years in the asylum. Wouldn't make a very long or cohesive episode. :-)

#426

Unspoiled

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Posted Sep 18, 2011 @ 4:02 PM

I've read many of the past posts on this thread, trying to get myself to like "Subject 13" better than I did on watching it. "Peter" just has such a special place in my heart, this episode really paled for me. But I'm trying to feel it! Please, let's have an episode this season which goes into the 80's again! Maybe I'll see some poignant memory-erasing situations and/or brainwashing of our characters to explain the backstory further!

Edited by Unspoiled, Sep 18, 2011 @ 4:54 PM.


#427

Ulkis

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Posted Sep 18, 2011 @ 5:39 PM

Don't worry, it's okay not to enjoy "Subject 13"! :) I think it's a good episode, but I don't rewatch it often myself - it's pretty depressing.

#428

Unspoiled

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Posted Sep 19, 2011 @ 4:03 PM

I appreciate that! I don't think I dislike it, so much as little things about it I find confusing. I love the perfomances. One thing I've been wondering about--in "Jacksonville" there were these toys and things in the daycare that Walter said were from the other side. I just can't figure out when those were acquired, or at what age Olivia first saw the glimmer on them.

#429

DixieGirl

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Posted Sep 19, 2011 @ 7:42 PM

I think Belly must've brought the toys back. Not sure about Olivia's age when she first noticed the glimmer, though.

#430

lizw65

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Posted Sep 19, 2011 @ 7:52 PM

I got the impression from "Jacksonville" that Olivia was about 3 or 4 when she first saw the "glimmer".

#431

DixieGirl

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Posted Sep 19, 2011 @ 8:53 PM

Olivia was about 3 or 4


I'm pretty sure that's about the time she torched the room, as the little girl huddled in the corner was quite small... so she very well could've seen the glimmer at the same time. I don't think they told us if her cortexi-powers appeared gradually or all at once.

#432

jipijapa

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Posted Apr 14, 2013 @ 1:06 PM

This is maybe the first Fringe episode I've rewatched since it aired and found it weaker than I originally thought it was. I still think the strong points were strong (the kids, and the mythology, particularly how Walternate came to learn the truth was very cleverly done)... but it really is a fundamentally odd episode to watch because John Noble is the only regular cast member in it.

I don't think the shuttling back and forth between the Walters and Elizabeths really worked very well. Also, it's really too bad that they didn't think to get Jenny Blong back (or she wasn't available), because Walter's assistant really needed to be Carla here.

The lack of meaningful interaction between Walter and Peter here still puzzles me. Why the writers chose to emphasize Walter's connection with Olivia, and Elizabeth's with Peter, is still a little odd. IMHO.

The Science Channel marathon this weekend is now, as I write this, plowing into the dodgiest section of Season 3... I'm taking a wee break and will return for the end-run of "LSD" through "The Day We Died." Doing a rewatch of these episodes doesn't change my opinion that the show was beginning to head off the rails during the 2nd half of the season -- and that the so-called reboot in Season 4 did wonders for refocusing the writers, even though many fans and reviewers weren't thrilled with Season 4.

It was enjoyable and in many ways "classic Fringe," but it was also getting crazy and not in a good way.

#433

petunia846

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Posted Jun 22, 2013 @ 10:36 AM

When Walter threatens Olivia's stepfather and warns him not to hurt her, is he basically giving up on sending Peter home at that point? I know he tells her they'll work on something new tomorrow, but that's starting all over from scratch when he already had something that was maybe 90% likely to yield results. For some reason I never really got the significance of that part of the episode before. I always thought, oh how nice, Walter is protecting Olivia, and then focus on the next scene with little Stockholm Syndrom Peter and the beginning of alcoholic Elizabeth. Anyway, I'm sure it wasn't a completely selfless decision on Walter's part...that just meant he had an excuse to keep Peter longer.