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Cash & Cari: Finding Treasures and Cashing In


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#1

chessiegal

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Posted Jan 18, 2011 @ 5:46 PM

New show on HGTV airing Mondays at 10 ET/9CT.

With her razor sharp business sense and an eye for spotting diamonds in the rough, estate sale guru Cari Cucksey combs through her clients' basements, attics and garages in search of hidden treasure. And once she and her team have organized and priced the entire contents of the home, they hold an estate sale right on the premises. From antique furniture and vintage toys to retro electronics and rare cars, there's something for everyone, and everything must go!


Great show for people who like going to yard and estate sales, or shopping at thrift, consignment, or antique shops.

#2

OldTowneTavern

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Posted Jan 18, 2011 @ 5:48 PM

I enjoy it. And it so much more civilized than Storage Wars, where people act like buzzards over people's lost belongings.

#3

NYdreaming

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Posted Jan 18, 2011 @ 8:41 PM

This one's been fun so far as a nice alternative to the endless reruns of HH, MFP, PV, et al. My dh wanted the pool table in the episode last night but swore that drill press is only worth $50! It naturally has the fakality TV manufactured drama. For instance, wouldn't she know the permit requirements and signage rules for sales in the various cities or towns in her local area? Just seemed so fake that one episode where they made them take the signs down. I would have asked the neighbors on the street corners if I could post the signs in their yards and possibly offered them a discount on something. Just one idea -

#4

stinkymcgee

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 8:49 AM

How is this show any different from Cash In The Attic?

#5

NYdreaming

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 9:07 AM

CITA had a set formula for each episode - one family, one home, money goal, home/basement search, appraisal and closing auction. So far, this has had slightly different dramas so far. It doesn't feel as staged, even though their basic formula consists of estate sale(s) together with an item redesign/reconstruction with an occasional individual antique sale thrown in.

The last one featured one estate sale heavy on tools plus another with women's china and glassware. They also included a Currier lithograph and a small cabinet redesign. We'll see if it gets boring like CITA as they go along. Another one featured antique cars.

Most importantly, it's not a HH rerun!

#6

AuntiePam

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 1:40 PM

Just caught about half an episode -- I think it's grandpa's house, the one with the barn full of old cars.

I like that Cari is researching as she makes her inventory. I'd like it better if she slowed down a bit, showed us more items, instead of covering two or three estates in one episode. There was enough stuff in grandpa's house to cover several episodes.

In my area (Iowa), many estates are disposed of by auction. The entire contents of a house (except for clothing and personal items) are sold, and it's not just antiques and collectibles that people are interested in -- people will buy everything. So it was frustrating that Cari valued the contents of grandpa's house at just $10,000. There was a lot of good stuff there, and a well-advertised sale should bring double that, at least.

Waste of time to show her staff moving stuff and loading the truck. Let's see the stuff!

I wouldn't have wasted time evaluating the Degas. Of course it's a reproduction, and Cari even considering that it might be genuine makes me wonder if she knows what she's doing.

#7

NYdreaming

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 5:02 PM

We've noticed a few things where we've questioned her skill, also. Yes, don't need to see the moving and the employee contest/drama.

I'd be surprised to see many homes that would bring in $20,000, unless they have some very significant items like the stable of antique cars. Yes, people will buy everything but they won't pay much for used goods. For instance, they asked $500 for that beautiful pool table because it needed many hours of restoration work and had a tough time selling it. (It was also huge so tough to move and set-up.)

Is it true that 10 or 12 of these "picker" shows already exist on other networks? Anybody recommend any of the others?

#8

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 5:28 PM

It's different, but I didn't find it especially interesting. Of course, I've been distracted the two times I've watched, so that could have affected it.

But every piece she's shown that she's done over has looked worse to me. I question her taste level.

#9

selkie

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 7:22 PM

For instance, wouldn't she know the permit requirements and signage rules for sales in the various cities or towns in her local area?


Her local area is metro Detroit, and given the township/town/city government structure in Michigan, there are probably 150 different municipalities within a 30 mile drive of her shop in Ferndale. And the show goes much further afield than that. At one point in a show they were having an estate sale in Alto/Ada which are Grand Rapids suburbs 2+ hours from Detroit.

Edited by selkie, Jan 19, 2011 @ 7:23 PM.


#10

NYdreaming

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 8:28 PM

I can appreciate that but I believe she has a professional responsibility to her clients to make one phone call (or have a staff member do it) to the municipality and determine the permit requirements before each sale. In fact, it's probably available online. Otherwise, she can seriously affect the clients' proceeds as indicated when the signs were removed. If she's not even professional enough to do that, she wouldn't be handling my estate sale. I'm sure they could find some other means of providing drama for the show, too.

Edited by NYdreaming, Jan 19, 2011 @ 9:35 PM.


#11

OSM Mom

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 10:18 PM

I know this is pretty shallow of me, but the pronunciation of her name bugs the crap out of me. If she pronounced it correctly, ie, "carry", the name of the show would make more sense to me. The whole "car-e" thing just bugs.

#12

Diane M

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 11:20 PM

You think you're shallow. I can't get past her last name. Can't help it.....it just sounds naughty to me.

#13

NYdreaming

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Posted Jan 20, 2011 @ 8:23 AM

Agree with you two on the name. I just pronounce it the normal way since it makes sense for the show. She must have changed it to be cool. Now, for the last name, we need to dream up a stage name and send it to her --

#14

chamuska

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Posted Jan 20, 2011 @ 9:32 AM

But every piece she's shown that she's done over has looked worse to me. I question her taste level.


ITA. The items would have looked better if she cleaned them up and left them in their original condition. All that spray painting and doodad adding makes them look gross.

#15

spaghettijimmy

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Posted Jan 20, 2011 @ 4:30 PM

I wonder how long she has been in business? I am a dealer with nearly 27 years in the business, and I'm not particularly impressed with the Estates she has handled, that "Degas" painting was absurd, and I hate her "redos" in the shabby chic style that is about 10 years out of date, however, male friend is impressed by her MILFness, LOL.

#16

NYdreaming

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Posted Jan 20, 2011 @ 5:38 PM

Yep, don't think I'd be hiring her if I lived in Detroit or buying any shabby chic junk. IIRC, she discounted one of those redos in her shop on the last episode.

To you dealers/experts, what about the fact that you can negatively affect value by remaking items? Or, are the items she's cherry-picking for her shop from the estates such low quality antiques that it doesn't matter? That last cabinet did look like it wouldn't have sold, as she said. Which items need to be left intact, in their original state?

Nate Berkus seems to constantly recommend remakes also but his appraiser indicated the other day that changing the wheels on a classic red wagon had negatively affected the value. Just one example -

BTW, wouldn't want Car-ee cherry picking my junk, either.

#17

AngelaHunter44

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Posted Jan 20, 2011 @ 6:34 PM

I'm no expert, but I do know that if antiques have any value then painting them would totally destroy that value. For the type of old junk (not real antiques) I saw on the one episode I watched of this show, e.g. the old chair, it doesn't matter what she does to it.

Agree the shabby, crackle finish stuff is long since out of date.

#18

spaghettijimmy

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Posted Jan 21, 2011 @ 12:37 PM

To you dealers/experts, what about the fact that you can negatively affect value by remaking items? Or, are the items she's cherry-picking for her shop from the estates such low quality antiques that it doesn't matter?


You hit the nail on the head, the stuff she picks to redo starts out as crap, but I hate how she has been having it redone--to either her credit, or the editor's hand, she hasn't cherry-picked anything that the family would have made more money on during the Estate Sale, and she pays more money for some of the stuff than I would have given.

There is a whole art to pricing at Estate Sales, btw, for example most people probably don't know that at least 75% of the people going to such sales are dealers, the effective Estate Sale manager needs to know how to price right to maximize the Estate's profits without turning off their likely buyers who also want to make some sort of profit. Knowing the "value" of an object is just the first step since valuation by internet or by book is totally subjective in most cases (it is rather different in the world of fine antiques where auction records may suggest a more reliable value.)

#19

Suz at Large

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Posted Jan 21, 2011 @ 8:38 PM

the stuff she picks to redo starts out as crap, but I hate how she has been having it redone--to either her credit, or the editor's hand, she hasn't cherry-picked anything that the family would have made more money on during the Estate Sale,

spaghettijimmy, thanks for this. It seemed to me that she didn't pick anything all that wonderful for those makeovers, but it's good to have a more informed opinion than my amateur ideas.

That said, I so agree that she takes beat-up unattractive crap pieces and turns them into freshly-painted tarted-up pieces that are even more unappealing. But priced a lot higher. Those things are just fugly after she and her assistant (or whoever that person is) get finished with them. Not only are they rendered ugly and overpriced, whatever potential I, as a shopper, could have seen in the pieces in their original form, is long gone.

#20

NYdreaming

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Posted Jan 21, 2011 @ 8:56 PM

Thanks for the info, Jimmy. Totally makes sense that she needs to save some margin for her regulars, although my dh was convinced some of them overpaid for the tools because of the thrill (haha) of their HGTV cameo.

I bought some nice collectibles recently and planned to sell a few extras. Checked E-Bay and the dealers were selling them at 2-3, usually 3 times retail! Don't know enough about E-Bay to know if things sell at those "buy it now" prices.

Anyone know a good source to check online auction value, other than hit-or-miss on the auction websites themselves? What would Cary be using to price miscellaneous things, other than just her gut or experience and that subjectivity Jimmy mentioned above?

A good weekend to all --

#21

CourtneyLove

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Posted Jan 25, 2011 @ 2:13 AM

I hate her name too, but I doubt she changed it to be cool.. Paula Deen has a niece or stepdaughter named Car-ee (cari) so it's not unique.. I'm surprised by the low figures as well, and then she takes like 50% of the profit, which seems insane. That lunchbox guy could have just taken pics of his car and sold it via the news paper perhaps, and kept all of his lunchboxes based on how much he probably made after paying Cari... I know she does a lot of work, but it seems pointless to me to hire her to sell a house's contents and then make less than $2000 after she charges you for everything!

#22

NYdreaming

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Posted Jan 25, 2011 @ 7:27 AM

You know, Courtney, I believe her clients know they're paying for the service of having her people come in, organize everything and clean it all out/donate it for the tax deduction. I'm sure they know they could individually post all those items on E-bay and keep that margin for themselves but it takes many hours of their time.

Plus, these are estate sales, so the emotional involvement could make it extremely difficult. They just want someone to clear it out and give them the check, albeit small, plus the tax deduction form. They're done with it. Then they can probably sell the property and split that hopefully larger check with the relatives.

#23

Jennionthefarm

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Posted Jan 25, 2011 @ 8:19 AM

In my area (Iowa), many estates are disposed of by auction. The entire contents of a house (except for clothing and personal items) are sold, and it's not just antiques and collectibles that people are interested in -- people will buy everything. So it was frustrating that Cari valued the contents of grandpa's house at just $10,000. There was a lot of good stuff there, and a well-advertised sale should bring double that, at least.


It seems like they'd be better off having an auction, but maybe they don't do that in Michigan or they don't have enough to do so? I believe the auctioneer gets 10%. They'd have to take it outside themselves though, based on my experience, so perhaps they mostly want Cari etc. to clean stuff out?

#24

selkie

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Posted Jan 25, 2011 @ 9:21 AM

We googled her name to try to figure out where her shop was, (answer: Fabulous Ferndale) and if she has changed her name, it was pretty much out of high school since she shows up as Cari in some 5K race results in the 20-24 age group back in the day.

#25

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Posted Jan 25, 2011 @ 11:41 AM

I've actually contracted with auctioneers for business clients. They want a large number of high quality items - they're not interested in cleaning out your basement and disposing of a bunch of junk that won't sell. So far, none of the sales she's done on the show looked like something an auctioneer would take.

WRT her name, I thought perhaps she changed the pronunciation. In addition, wasn't the name of the shop changed prior to the show?

#26

chessiegal

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Posted Jan 25, 2011 @ 2:05 PM

Everytime I see tables covered with dishes and glassware I wish I could jump through my TV screen. I inherited a few pieces of depression glass, and then started collecting. It's a guilty pleasure. I have to say, the amount of "stuff" in that house would be overwhelming to me if I had to dispose of it.

#27

OldTowneTavern

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Posted Jan 25, 2011 @ 9:46 PM

I think I'd have looked hard at that china if I were at that sale. I definitely would want the 30s/40s style cabinet it was resting on.

I'm really surprised that people are taken aback by the pronunciation of her name as [KAHree] instead of [KAAree]. I'm more inclined to say [KAHra] than [KAAra] and was surprised to find it's [AAlton] Brown instead of [AHlton]. It's a toMAYto toMAHto issue. And, it's not so unusual. Did anyone watch Kari Wuhrer on MTV's Remote Control? That was 20 years ago.

Edited by OldTowneTavern, Jan 25, 2011 @ 9:47 PM.


#28

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Posted Jan 26, 2011 @ 5:27 AM

Don't care how she pronounces her name. Never met a "Car-ree" so maybe it's a regional thing. Bottom line, I think we're trying to say "Carry" because it works with the premise of the show.

Watched this week's episode tonight. Intrigued by the Japanese screen and loved all the 30's furniture. Wanted to take that icebox home and refurbish it.

Can pass on the Sears cabinet and fire trap, er Pinto. If we went to that sale, I'd have to restrain my dh from buying the tractor. Would that putt-putt up the SF hills?

#29

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Posted Jan 26, 2011 @ 8:47 AM

I've actually contracted with auctioneers for business clients. They want a large number of high quality items - they're not interested in cleaning out your basement and disposing of a bunch of junk that won't sell. So far, none of the sales she's done on the show looked like something an auctioneer would take.


There's a huge range of auctioneers and some do indeed have a business in which the entire contents of a home is auctioned off.

I am probably generalizing but my experience is that those auction houses which conduct auctions on THEIR premises are selective with a range from the super upscale auction houses to those which conduct auctions of items of more moderate value. One of the famous auction houses in NY (can't remember which one) has a subsidiary which auctioned off what was essentially upscale used furniture - i.e. items that weren't valuable enough for its very high end auctions. Many decorators would pick up stuff at the lesser sales.

But when an auction is held on site, it generally disposes of the entire contents of a home. I think this happens more frequently in rural areas. Beyond stuff like tools, used furniture, possible collectibles, there are people who make a living selling "junk" in quantity at flea markets; swap meets and "thrift stores".

#30

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Posted Jan 26, 2011 @ 9:42 AM

We're not talking about the NYC or SF auction houses. The auctioneers that do entire sites are extremely particular and require that you have several draws (high value items) to bring in a crowd to the sale. A '77 Pinto won't cut it. IMHO, after managing many auctions for clients, they wouldn't want a $6K total sale. They'd want several $6K items, plus many more small items.

If a seller tries to hold out key items and sell them online to keep the margin for themselves, the auctioneer won't take the sale. It's all or nothing. For the the smaller items or remaining junk, they'll sell them in lots. So, in that farmhouse episode, the $500 garage would have been the final lot after they sold the car, tractor and other large or valuable tools.

If Cari did auctions, we might see her add high value items from her store to these sales, if any given estate lacked draws. If these sellers had more stuff, I don't think they'd be calling her. To me, she's one step above a garage/tag sale. The site auctioneers are one step above her.

JMHO, YMMV.

Edited by NYdreaming, Jan 26, 2011 @ 9:44 AM.