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Blaine: Mix Up the Letters, Eventually, You'll Get Nebali


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#16771

Jester85

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 5:57 PM

Cooper Anderson is a deliberately over-the-top comic character, but so was Sue's mother Doris, and that didn't mean Doris didn't illuminate anything about Sue's character.
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#16772

boxedturtle

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 10:12 PM

I'll buy that a lot of Blaine's showboating might be rooted in his feelings that he was always ignored in favor of his older brother, but the level of anger and resntment that he showed seemed really overblown and I found it hard not to laugh at times. Seeing Blaine during the Duran Duran mashup doing everything possible to get attention refocused on him while everyone was gravitating to Cooper reminded me of a small dog, jumping up on everything and barking - doing everything possible to try to regain everyone's attention while they're focused on something else.


I don't buy that his issue with Cooper was resentment over him "stealing" ND's attention during the masterclass or the Duran Duran mashup, especially considering the scene leading up to the performance where he is shown as quite embarrassed and reluctant to perform with his brother. This really doesn't lead me to believe that these are the actions of someone intent on getting everyone's attention. There may be some showboating rivalry but much of it seems to be more a plea for Cooper in particular to respect and like him, not ND. He directly says to Cooper in the masterclass "You're my brother, why can't you just support me," while ignoring the group around them and his acting during the NCIS scene was extremely understated in comparison to Rachel's, again not the actions of someone screaming for attention from his peers.

Someone already mentioned how he looked at Cooper throughout the Duran Duran performance for cues and his happiness during and after the number until Cooper's fateful words explaining that his brother didn't really pay attention to him at all. These seem to point that his need for validation was specifically geared towards his brother. When he felt that he and his brother had a great time rocking it together he seemed more than happy to share the spotlight afterwards smiling and hugging Cooper, it was only when Cooper revealed his inattention to him that his face fell.

In Blaine's private conversation with Kurt, when given a chance to explain what his issue was with his brother the first thing he says is "He's the one that's leaving" which I think is very telling of his feelings.

The conversation they had in the diner too had him smiling at his brother's antics until Cooper again showed that he found problems with Blaine. Blaine is emotional saying that he would "love" getting to know Cooper while at the same time showing frustration with Cooper's admittedly douche behaviors. His final conversation with Cooper in the auditorium has him explicitly stating that "[being friends] is exactly what [he's] always wanted to be" and the songs (however well or terribly they were done) all reflect his anger at being abandoned and criticized by Cooper, wanting specifically his older brothers attention, love and validation.

Edited by boxedturtle, Apr 12, 2012 @ 10:36 PM.

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#16773

Jester85

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 10:23 PM

Well pointed out, that Blaine didn't even want to do the Duran Duran performance until he was badgered into it, and didn't really want to be part of the acting class either.
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#16774

MGaboriau

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 8:44 AM

Cooper Anderson is a deliberately over-the-top comic character, but so was Sue's mother Doris, and that didn't mean Doris didn't illuminate anything about Sue's character.

OTT is certainly one of the writers' preferred strategies, as a quick and efficient way to develop characters and plots (the musical numbers being the most frequent one). They have used it before with other characters; now it was Blaine's turn and Cooper was the device they designed for it. Such sharp writing choices carry with them a few storytelling conventions.

I tend to think most viewers won't mistake Glee for a totally realistic show and would recognise its heightened stories for what they are; an amplification of often minor conflicts and tensions. However, even though this caricatural bent is not part of our own daily experience, it is an integral part of the show's internal reality and logic; within the show's narrative and for the characters, OTT is to be considered as a true reality because this is how they experience their world. It makes sense to them within the story (at least for the duration of each individual episode), in this specific instance for Blaine in relation to his brother.

Since we observe this from a distance, most viewers can probably make the necessary distinctions between script-generated exaggeration and real-world referents. We are able to identify Cooper as OTT, but the characters don't have that luxury because that would contradict the writing approach chosen. What makes sense within the narrative of Glee in terms of motivations or (dare I use the word when discussing this show?) of psychology would often fail in a realistic show; but it is what constitutes the characters' authentic experience of that world, inside the confines of the Glee narrative.

And within that context, Blaine was indeed making the only truly intelligent comments during the master class, whatever his reasons for doing so; granted, considering how uncritically accepting everyone else was to the nonsense they were being fed, that was a rather low bar to exceed. It was useful for this episode and for that scene to put him in that position, but such attributes are not necessarily lasting on the show. Next time, Cooper might turn out to be the true adult.

This collective temporary suspension of critical thinking by the Gleeks was of course another form of OTT plot turn.

However, the illuminations that can be provided by OTT narrative devices are not necessarily long-lived because of how these writers use them. Did what we learned about Sue through Doris survive for long in the next few episodes she appeared in? She has been sort of all over the place until the recent pregnancy and alliance with Will. Perhaps Blaine's path will be similar: whatever demonstrations they were aiming for in this episode would then soon turn out to having been only transient and will be contradicted or just ignored for the rest of the season. Only to maybe eventually be revisited when they realise it's been a long time since they focused their attention on Blaine as a character and not simply as a walking jukebox.
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#16775

sothinky

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Posted Apr 16, 2012 @ 8:37 AM

Did what we learned about Sue through Doris survive for long in the next few episodes she appeared in? She has been sort of all over the place until the recent pregnancy and alliance with Will. Perhaps Blaine's path will be similar: whatever demonstrations they were aiming for in this episode would then soon turn out to having been only transient and will be contradicted or just ignored for the rest of the season. Only to maybe eventually be revisited when they realise it's been a long time since they focused their attention on Blaine as a character and not simply as a walking jukebox.


Yes—agreed. I think one thing we see on Glee is that the traits inherent to a character's makeup don't really change. They face situations where they have to recognize they have said traits and deal with them. But those traits are like a ball and chain—they will always be there. That's not to say that characters—or people for that matter—don't change, but once we're cognizant of some issue we have, we find ways to adapt ourselves to it (or we don't). So yeah, while there is the level of the show and its need to seemingly drop things for plot reasons, there is a philosophy there, nonetheless. I dunno.

I do think other posters have pointed out a subtlety about Blaine's performing, though, that's revealed in "Big Brother." I know most see him as a showboater, but the "Duran Duran" mashup, as others have said, helps us see otherwise. I even think about "Fighter" and his other angry/sad songs of late, like "Cough Syrup," and how Blaine won't do those kinds of things publicly—to more or less make sure everyone knows how he feels. I keep going back to that moment where he says, in front of everyone, but to Coop, "Can't you just support me?" He's totally vulnerable there and public, too—which we rarely see with him.

There's no argument about Blaine's liking to perform (when it's safe and he's relatively confident what he'll do will be "approved," which by the way is interesting in light of some of his earlier songs this season in front of the choir, where he was actually criticized after). But I don't see him as someone who has to be at the center of it all, or who even feels as if he deserves any special treatment whatsoever. Even when Coop tells Blaine at the end how talented he is, the expression on Blaine's face is more one of disbelief than, "Yeah, that's right." Given his traits, I really wonder what his plans will end up being for post-MKHS. What does he want for himself?

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#16776

Jester85

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 8:33 AM

I also wonder what Blaine's future intentions are. Darren has said Klaine will discuss the future in 3x17, so hopefully we'll find out something then.
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#16777

subdrone

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 11:56 AM

My problem with Blaine is twofold:

1. He's given a disproportionate amount of solos and screentime compared to the other characters.

(He's given a solo, solo in a group number, or duet nearly every episode regardless of plot relevance.)

2. He's a flat flat flat flat flat character.

(Who's range as a character extends into such riveting, thought provoking areas such as pretty, angry, and boyfriend.)

This episode showcased both of those problems. Because he was given 4? solos or duets and an entire episode that revolved around him even though there are a dozen plus other characters on the show. And because despite the ungodly amount of time we spent watching Blaine be pissed his brother because he wouldn't give him his toys, (Remember when Quinn got hit by a truck?) he didn't grow as a character. He didn't learn anything. No ambiguities were injected into his characterization. He's still gratingly flat. He's still just pretty, angry, and boyfriend.

(Which would be fine if he was tertiary or secondary character and not the black hole character that he is.)
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#16778

Ireland77

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Posted Apr 17, 2012 @ 4:28 PM

So based on this, I am gonna to assume that having lil' Blaine singing to MMMBop in the episode was influenced by Darren.
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#16779

Mixi

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Posted Apr 18, 2012 @ 2:56 AM

And because despite the ungodly amount of time we spent watching Blaine be pissed his brother because he wouldn't give him his toys, (Remember when Quinn got hit by a truck?) he didn't grow as a character.


Really? Because he wouldn't give him his toys? I would think this was the case if I only saw STIUTK but considering the rest of the episode..not really. Blaine's issue with his brother was his complete lack of support and how he tears down Blaine every chance he gets, and how he's been doing it his entire life. I have two older sisters so I was able to relate. Unfortunately my older sisters didn't do it because they want me to ~be all I can be, but that's my own issue. What I took away from this episode, as far as Blaine is concerned, is that he's always looking for approval and attention because he doesn't get it from anyone in his family. It didn't tell us much new stuff about Blaine apart from the fact that he randomly has a brother, but it did help me understand why he's the way he is. I mean, I wasn't expecting much, this is a show with a character like Brittany, who never makes sense and should even exist.

When it comes to Blaine I think at the end of the day either you like him or you don't, and I don't think anything is gonna change that at this point. Big Brother worked for me, but I've been a Blaine fan since Silly Love Songs, so.

Anyways, I was coming here to say that with Blaine's moves in You Should Be Dancing, I'd love for him to be a Cheerio. And if Brittany doesn't graduate (which she likely won't), I'd love to see the two of them on a Cheerio duet.
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#16780

kineticzo

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Posted Apr 18, 2012 @ 1:17 PM

When it comes to Blaine I think at the end of the day either you like him or you don't, and I don't think anything is gonna change that at this point. Big Brother worked for me, but I've been a Blaine fan since Silly Love Songs, so.



I liked him alot more last year, I liked the persona he had at Dalton. This year with revamped character 2.0 or 3.0 they've done with Blaine I like him less. With me alot has to do with the writing...I used to like Rachel alot more than I do now, for example. So it can be more complicated than just you like someone or you don't. I want to "like" Rachel more . Ditto Blaine.

The angst over Brother Cooper was way overdone IMO. Mileage varying and all that.

Edited by kineticzo, Apr 18, 2012 @ 1:52 PM.

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#16781

AwesomeWelles

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 6:39 AM

Darren Criss tearing up is heartbreaking, every single time. He's really grown since he first arrived. He found something real with Kurt and it's made him insecure, and I know people call it the writers messing up, but his whole story just rings true. It just fits. Admittedly it's occasionally rushed but the actions, the feelings, everything, just seems real. I don't think there has been a character like him on television before, and there certainly not a relationship like his. Not that I've seen anyway.
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#16782

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 11:46 AM

He found something real with Kurt and it's made him insecure


I think the show has shown that for all his outside bravado and self confident air, Blaine is a bundle of insecurities with serious self esteem issues.

His "anger" is an outlet for all these issues, which appear to stem from Daddy lack of approval, big brother lack of support,gay bashing, etc. I think Kurt is the least of it as far as Blaine's "insecurities" IMO.

Edited by delplata, Apr 26, 2012 @ 12:44 PM.

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#16783

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 12:59 PM

What's really unfortunate is that Kurt is everything to Blaine, but Blaine is so afraid of Kurt leaving that he's done everything possible to push Kurt out the door. Kurt has his own enormous insecuries based on being all but untouchable and unworthy of affection for so long. For Blaine to have withdrawn his affection both emotionally and physicially, could not be more of a signal to Kurt that he was no longer a priority in Blaine's life. The exact opposite was true, but this was the impression that Blaine was unwittingly giving Kurt.

Both characters badly misread the actions of the other. I believe very strongly that a lot of Kurt's reasons for engaging in some flirting with Chandler was not only for emotional gratification, but an attempt to regain Blaine's attention. He wasn't doing a lot to hide his texting, doing a lot of it while sitting right next to his boyfriend (who's posture during that scene - very closed off and in on himself - was very telling). Blaine's behavior when the truth came out was petulant and very vicious towards Kurt. Yes, he has ample justification to feel hurt and afraid by Kurt's non-relationship, but it was clear that he really wasn't listening to Kurt. When Kurt expressed his very sincere feelings that he was feeling emotionally abandoned, Blaine deflected and put the focus on Kurt's actions. He threw the fact that he transfered schools in Kurt's face (as if that above all else should always stand as evidence of his current feelings and basically was demanding what more did Kurt want from him). And then in glee, he sought to publicly punish Kurt for his transgressions by calling him out in front of all their teammates and friends. It was an exceedingly cruel and petty thing to do.

Even when given the opportunity to speak his mind to Kurt freely in Emma's office, Blaine couldn't help from first trying to put the focus on Kurt's failings and the petty annoyances. It took him a good while to finally reveal just what was eating at him and his rational for pushing Kurt away. Blaine is very fortunate that Kurt's own bad confrontation tactic (shutting down and turning into an ice cube) actually worked in their favor because Kurt didn't allow himself to escalate their arguement. He wouldn't rise to Blaine's insults and baiting, and instead continued to try to reach out to him.
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#16784

a finn gleek

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 2:50 PM

And then in glee, he sought to publicly punish Kurt for his transgressions by calling him out in front of all their teammates and friends. It was an exceedingly cruel and petty thing to do.


I can't believe how these kids keep bringing up their problems so openly in the Glee club. But Blaine is a guy who equalled some hip action in Sectionals to selling oneself and then yelled about it in front of the club to a homeless boy who had to resort to stripping to provide for his family (seriously, how much can this show crap on Sam? And he doesn't even complain that much) so if Blaine has a consistent character trait, it's blowing up at people in front of the club. I actually like this about him, I enjoy angry!Blaine.

I have been waiting for a Klaine-fight and Blaine to throw the transfer in Kurt's face. I don't think Blaine would be human if he didn't resent Kurt one bit for that. He may say whatever he wants, and I'm sure he likes being with Kurt, but the fact is that Blaine transferred because of Kurt, mere months after Kurt had first transferred out of the school they went together. Basically, if Kurt needed Blaine so, he should have just stayed in Dalton. What about Blaine's senior year, which would be way more special in Dalton, I believe. I don't like that they didn't come up with a better excuse for Blaine's transfer (there were a million that were speculated on during the summer. All were better than the one we got) and I think that's one of the reasons I don't like this pairing all that much. With the transfer and what occured in Michael (Kurt getting rid of the evidence on Blaine's "assault" without consulting him first), if Blaine were a girl, me and my inner feminist would be RAGING about this relationship in the "Gender Issues" -thread.
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#16785

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 3:14 PM

f Blaine has a consistent character trait, it's blowing up at people in front of the club. I actually like this about him, I enjoy angry!Blaine.


I don't "mind" it but it just proves he's as much of an asshole as any of the other characters. At first they tried to present him as "nicer" than the ND kids, but really the only consistently nice people are TIKE and they rarely get story lines.

He may say whatever he wants, and I'm sure he likes being with Kurt, but the fact is that Blaine transferred because of Kurt, mere months after Kurt had first transferred out of the school they went together. Basically, if Kurt needed Blaine so, he should have just stayed in Dalton. What about Blaine's senior year, which would be way more special in Dalton, I believe.


I agree, but the point is that Blaine must be pretty needy if weighing all that he decided to transfer anyways. It wasn't as if Kurt was breaking up with him if he didn't transfer, that's why I'm loathe to "blame" Kurt for all the so called sacrifices Blaine did.

Edited by kineticzo, Apr 26, 2012 @ 3:06 PM.

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#16786

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 3:43 PM

Blaine's behavior when the truth came out was petulant and very vicious towards Kurt. Yes, he has ample justification to feel hurt and afraid by Kurt's non-relationship, but it was clear that he really wasn't listening to Kurt. When Kurt expressed his very sincere feelings that he was feeling emotionally abandoned, Blaine deflected and put the focus on Kurt's actions. He threw the fact that he transfered schools in Kurt's face (as if that above all else should always stand as evidence of his current feelings and basically was demanding what more did Kurt want from him).


In that bedroom scene I didn't see Blaine as petulant or vicious at all. I didn't really think he was throwing the transfer in Kurt's face. He didn't say it like it was something he held against Kurt, but was trying more to point out that his actions should count for something-- it's not like he transferred because Kurt badgered him into it, he transferred because he loves Kurt so much that that made him happiest. Obviously that doesn't give him a free pass, and Kurt had justification in feeling like he wasn't getting as much validation as usual since Blaine was deliberately pulling away, but I can see why Blaine would think their history should prove to Kurt how much he matters to him.

And then in glee, he sought to publicly punish Kurt for his transgressions by calling him out in front of all their teammates and friends. It was an exceedingly cruel and petty thing to do.


Petty, maybe, but I wouldn't say "exceedingly cruel". This is Glee, these kids are always playing out their relationship drama in the choir room; just last year Kurt had most of them accusing him of cheating on Blaine in a way that was much more baseless than Blaine was here. I didn't blame him for being angry and hurt after Kurt's dismissive attitude. As far as Blaine was concerned, Kurt had been one foot out the door for a while and that whole argument just fed into his fears that Kurt was having no trouble with the idea of leaving Blaine behind and could replace him with his exciting new life in New York. It certainly wasn't the ideal way to handle things but it was understandable to me.

Even when given the opportunity to speak his mind to Kurt freely in Emma's office, Blaine couldn't help from first trying to put the focus on Kurt's failings and the petty annoyances. It took him a good while to finally reveal just what was eating at him and his rational for pushing Kurt away. Blaine is very fortunate that Kurt's own bad confrontation tactic (shutting down and turning into an ice cube) actually worked in their favor because Kurt didn't allow himself to escalate their arguement. He wouldn't rise to Blaine's insults and baiting, and instead continued to try to reach out to him.


Kurt's confrontation tactic is, when backed into a corner, lash out and derail and find a way to regain the upper hand. He's done it a lot in the past, and he did it with Blaine too by pretty much saying he "drove" Kurt to someone else for emotional validation/support and then going off on a tangent about all the other unrelated reasons he's resentful of Blaine. And yes, if Blaine hadn't been distancing himself Kurt wouldn't have felt the need, but at the same time Kurt should've taken some responsibility for his own actions when he got caught out on it. As far as the office scene, the first thing Blaine brings up is the texting, but then also immediately acknowledges the similarity between that and his actions with Sebastian, so I didn't think he was trying to pin everything on Kurt there. Bringing up his petty (and very amusing) annoyances with Kurt about the snapping and the bronzer felt more like a way of talking around the problem/building up to discussing the real painful issue than an attempt at baiting.

Edited by toasterdeath, Apr 26, 2012 @ 3:44 PM.

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#16787

Jester85

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 3:47 PM

I think Kurt is a stronger person than Blaine, that Blaine is basically a big ball of insecurity beneath his cool, collected, assured persona he tries to maintain, and that Blaine is the more co-dependent one in the relationship.

I'm not saying Blaine isn't a major aspect of Kurt's life, of course he is, but Kurt's existence doesn't revolve around Blaine, whereas it kind of seems like Blaine's life does revolve around Kurt. He couldn't even handle being at different schools in the same general area where they saw each other regularly outside of school anyway, which might not bode well for his emotional state when Kurt moves to NYC.

I do think Blaine has valid cause to be upset about the Chandler situation, and I think Kurt egged Chandler on more than Blaine did with Sebastian, even though I don't think Kurt cared about Chandler himself per se or had any interest in going any further with him, he just liked the attention, the flattery, and the ego-stroking.

Musically raging at Kurt in front of Mr. Schue and all of New Directions is definitely not the best way to deal with your relationship problems, but I can't really hold that too much against Blaine specifically, considering that's pretty much how all of ND rolls and is par for the course for Glee.

I think overall Klaine is a much more steady and healthy relationship than Finchel. I think, while Kurt shares some of Rachel's ego, self-centeredness, and prima donna tendencies, he's not as extreme with any of them as her, and I think Blaine is less selfish than Finn. For the most part, they actually (gasp) have conversations instead of freaking out and jumping recklessly into some panicky ill-advised move like cheating on each other in a vengeful pissing contest, or jump spontaneously into an engagement driven by their insecurities.

However, they both have defensive mechanisms that kick in when they're upset or hurt by something, and I think this was a case where their shields clashed with each other. I think Kurt sometimes has trouble letting himself get close to people or even knowing how to do so because of all the years where he was made to feel like an untouchable pariah and retreated completely into himself and his aloof, haughtily superior ice queen shell. The only people he made exceptions for were his father and to a point Mercedes, and it's only been through his relationship with Blaine and he and Rachel growing close that he's learning to let go and be in open emotional relationships with people he lets in close to him. Look at Kurt in S1 and Kurt now, and the difference is striking. S1 Kurt was a seemingly cold, haughty ice queen who was really a scared and desperately lonely boy backed into a corner and defending himself. We've seen enough moments of Kurt being exceedingly kind to someone (the flowers to congratulate Blaine about Tony, for which he puts his own ego aside, which for him is not always an easy task, the very big and compassionate way he reached out to Karofsky despite the past emotional trauma Karofsky put him through), to show that there is a sweet, tender-hearted, loving boy deep down inside the ice queen, who is slowly learning that it's okay to poke his head out without getting slushied or thrown into a dumpster. He has learned to be close with people, but he still has the ice queen defensive mode that he goes into when people upset him. He is also proud and self-righteous, and sometimes egotistical, and sometimes all of those things give him a hard time admitting when he's wrong about something.

I also think his lack of inexperience functioning in a relationship led him to his misguided attempt to get Blaine's attention back by blatantly giggling at flirty texts from Chandler. Major communication fail.

In general, I think Blaine is a more mellow, laidback, and quote unquote "nice" person than Kurt is. He makes friends with people much more easily, at least on a superficial level, and of course has the good looks and innate charisma that give him a magnetic presence to people. But it's skindeep. Not his, I believe, basic decency as a person (having basic decency doesn't mean I think Blaine is a saint, but I think he, and Kurt for that matter, are at their core compassionate and loving), but we've seen time and again that Blaine is eaten up with insecurities beneath his self-assured outward persona. And like most teens, he's overdramatic and over-emotional and makes mountains out of molehills. A drunken kiss with a girl while playing spin the bottle made him question his entire sexual orientation. He can't even bear to be separated from Kurt for a few hours a day going to different schools, as if they're on different continents or something (which again, leaves room for concern about how he's going to hold up next year). He flipped out on Sam out of all proportion (although IMO the real trigger was Finn jumping enthusiastically all over Sam's suggestions while essentially telling Blaine to sit down and shut up any time he tried to say anything). And like almost everyone else in ND, his response to being hurt by his significant other is to get up in front of everyone and musically ***** them out for a few minutes.

I think maybe Klaine's biggest problem as a couple is that, in slightly different ways, neither is the type to open up about their pain. Kurt shuts down and retreats back into ice queen mode where he is right about everything, while Blaine keeps up his "aw shucks" happy-smiley demeanor until he can't take it anymore and flips out in some uber-angsty solo meltdown.

You could also read Blaine's co-dependency as stemming from feeling emotionally neglected at best, run down at worst, by his father and brother. Kurt is the one person he feels safe and loved with, and he clings desperately to him.

Ironically, while at least superficially, Kurt is the more (seemingly) cool and aloof, and Blaine is more (seemingly) the friendly puppy jumping on everyone and licking their face, Kurt has more people he's close with than Blaine seems to, and if Blaine doesn't make closer friends with Artie and Tina, he's going to have a very, very hard and lonely senior year.

I also think it's quite a stretch to call Blaine's behavior "vicious" and "exceedingly cruel", but mileage varies.

I don't see how he was vicious at all in the bedroom, to me he was just more sad and hurt than anything else, and to me Kurt came across as the more petulant one. It was in the choir room where he went into Musical Rage, but I wouldn't call it "cruel", more like typical teenage over-dramatic reactions to being hurt, and even more typical New Directions behavior.

Edited by Jester85, Apr 26, 2012 @ 3:48 PM.

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#16788

kineticzo

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 4:00 PM

In general, I think Blaine is a more mellow, laidback, and quote unquote "nice" person than Kurt is. He makes friends with people much more easily, at least on a superficial level, and of course has the good looks and innate charisma that give him a magnetic presence to people. But it's skindeep.


On a superficial level Blaine is the "golden boy" who everybody likes and gushes over, which makes his deep insecurities even more ironic. I agree that for all of Kurt's defenses, he feels more genuine love from others than Blaine does. Kurt has his dad, Mercedes, Rachel and Finn as people who genuinely love him , for all their clashes with him. At the end of the day, it seems the only person Blaine has is Kurt.

Doesn't bode well for Kurt to be in NY next year.

Edited by kineticzo, Apr 26, 2012 @ 4:03 PM.

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#16789

Jester85

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 4:48 PM

While Kurt is a much more-developed and three-dimensional character (I think a case could be made that he's the most three-dimensional character on Glee, actually), I do find that an intriguing aspect of Blaine, albeit one that's been explored with limited depth. The paradox of the "golden boy" who was idolized by the Warblers and effortlessly draws people to him, but doesn't feel appreciated by the people who matter the most...his family.

Sometimes the most popular, seemingly "have it all" people are the most lonely and insecure inside, and I think Blaine fits that.
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#16790

lleykian54

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 5:16 PM

Sometimes the most popular, seemingly "have it all" people are the most lonely and insecure inside, and I think Blaine fits that.



So Blaine is "Richard Cory"?

I don't see how he was vicious at all in the bedroom, to me he was just more sad and hurt than anything else, and to me Kurt came across as the more petulant one.


I agree. Honestly, I like Klaine well enough and I was wincing at some of Kurt's comments in the bedroom scene and thinking at one point, "well damn, if you resent this boy so much, just break up with him". The song in front of the Glee club just felt like typical Glee "let's use songs and the time in the choir room to air out our business".

But honestly, I love Kurt and have never been a massive Blaine fan and I was irritated with his going on about how many solos he used to get and how he has to watch Blaine perform and all. Kurt feeling neglected and unloved by Blaine and his seeking that validation somewhere else is one thing.

But to not only be defensive and unapologetic when caught clearly doing something wrong but to use it as an opportunity to make it all Blaine's fault because of petty, silly things like solos and what not, just seemed really unfair to me. And again, I love the boy but yeah, totally not on his side on that one.

Edited by lleykian54, Apr 26, 2012 @ 5:43 PM.

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#16791

Jester85

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 5:33 PM

Same. I like Blaine well enough and I ship Klaine but Kurt is and always has been my favorite Glee character...but that doesn't mean I can't think he was more in the wrong in this instance.

And Kurt has been self-righteous on plenty of other occasions, usually whenever Burt calls him out on something. So Blaine is not a saint, but Kurt is far from one either.
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#16792

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 6:07 PM

Musically raging at Kurt in front of Mr. Schue and all of New Directions is definitely not the best way to deal with your relationship problems, but I can't really hold that too much against Blaine specifically, considering that's pretty much how all of ND rolls and is par for the course for Glee.

...

Blaine keeps up his "aw shucks" happy-smiley demeanor until he can't take it anymore and flips out in some uber-angsty solo meltdown.

...

I also think it's quite a stretch to call Blaine's behavior "vicious" and "exceedingly cruel", but mileage varies.

I don't see how he was vicious at all in the bedroom, to me he was just more sad and hurt than anything else, and to me Kurt came across as the more petulant one. It was in the choir room where he went into Musical Rage, but I wouldn't call it "cruel", more like typical teenage over-dramatic reactions to being hurt, and even more typical New Directions behavior.

I've snipped because damn long post!

What I got from Blaine this episode was HURT and FEAR, not necessarily in that order. I think all his actions can boil down to that. I think cruelty requires some kind of conscious effort and I don't think he had that. I think he was just so hurt and afraid it clouded everything and was all his being.

I also think by the end of the episode the hurt was maybe gone, or tempered at least, but the fear is palpable and should continue to colour his actions. It will be interesting to see what the show does with that.
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#16793

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 7:23 PM

I agree. Honestly, I like Klaine well enough and I was wincing at some of Kurt's comments in the bedroom scene and thinking at one point, "well damn, if you resent this boy so much, just break up with him". The song in front of the Glee club just felt like typical Glee "let's use songs and the time in the choir room to air out our business".

But honestly, I love Kurt and have never been a massive Blaine fan and I was irritated with his going on about how many solos he used to get and how he has to watch Blaine perform and all. Kurt feeling neglected and unloved by Blaine and his seeking that validation somewhere else is one thing.



Taking this to the Kurt thread.
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#16794

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Posted Apr 26, 2012 @ 11:38 PM

What I got from Blaine this episode was HURT and FEAR, not necessarily in that order. I think all his actions can boil down to that. I think cruelty requires some kind of conscious effort and I don't think he had that. I think he was just so hurt and afraid it clouded everything and was all his being.

I also think by the end of the episode the hurt was maybe gone, or tempered at least, but the fear is palpable and should continue to colour his actions. It will be interesting to see what the show does with that.

Last thing first - I'm probably more like Blaine in that I am anticipating the worst...that their relationship will end and Blaine's heart will be broken (Ryan said such is very possible a long time ago).

I agree that Blaine was dealing with fear and hurt (in that order). I won't defend all of the writer's choices here ("It's not right but it's okay" was obviously purposely over the top and meant to be somewhat humorous). Burt was dealing with his dread of losing Kurt the same way Blaine was...avoidance/distancing. It's a very common behavior pattern when dealing with impending loss.

I will say that Blaine should have talked to Kurt sooner about his insecurities, but how does a teenage boy say "I'm thrilled for your future, but can we please talk about something else because you are depressing the fuck out of me?" Or "I'm really supportive of your plans in New York (without me), but please don't break my heart and dump me?" Yeah, I don't see those words coming from a teenage guy on Glee. Hell, it took Burt missing three Friday dinners for him to work up the nerve to tell Kurt he was going to miss him and he didn't want him to go.

Blaine's reaction was exactly what I would have expected when he found dozens of questionable texts from a boy he didn't know on his boyfriend's phone. Kurt taking the opportunity to unload his "bundled" crap on him at that moment to deflect his own (in my opinion) poor behavior was just extremely poor story plotting. This stuff should have played out over a few episodes, not all crammed into one. It was all too sudden, and it made Blaine look reactionary and Kurt look heartless (neither of which is completely true). Blaine is at times reactionary, but I felt he was fairly justified this time.

Kurt had to think about whether or not to give Chandler his number, he did it anyway. He enjoyed the attention from the texts and even though he admitted he would not show them to Blaine, he continued to text with Redbull Boy even in front of his boyfriend. He leaves his phone and leaves Blaine alone with it knowing that Redbull Boy is incessant in his texting. He gets outraged when Blaine looks at his phone (doesn't even have to open it to see the text messages) and is genuinely surprised when a heated conflict ensues? Then he adds fuel to the fire by telling Blaine how hard it is to be his boyfriend (the stool joke was a hilarious entendre, btw). Admitting that he liked the way Redbull Boy's texts made him feel was, to Blaine, tantamount to emotional cheating. Cue Whitney Houston for Blaine to get all angry in song.

As far as Kurt's serenade to Blaine...wow, that was way more angry and confrontational than Whitney's version was. I was hoping for something a bit more contrite.

I think anyone who was paying attention was waiting for Blaine's reason for transferring to be brought up again in this kind of context, so that was completely predictable. Kurt wanted his senior year to be "magic" and it wouldn't be unless Blaine transferred. Okay Kurt, how is Blaine's senior year going to be "magic" now? Via Skype and expensive every weekend trips to New York that likely won't happen?

Blaine was trying to protect his heart by distancing a bit. I'm beginning to get the impression that Blaine gave his heart, his whole heart (to steal a phrase), to the wrong person. I still hope for the best for them as a couple but, like Blaine, I expect the worst.
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#16795

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 12:54 AM

Blaine was trying to protect his heart by distancing a bit. I'm beginning to get the impression that Blaine gave his heart, his whole heart (to steal a phrase), to the wrong person. I still hope for the best for them as a couple but, like Blaine, I expect the worst.


Well if you want to assign all the blame in this drama to one person, (initial Kurt Hummell) than yes, per your premise, they should break up.

If Blaine is going to be reduced to a puddle of angry tears over texting to Chandler, there is no way he's going to survive Kurt being in the Big Apple. IMO.
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#16796

Jester85

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 1:52 AM

I'm beginning to get the impression that Blaine gave his heart, his whole heart (to steal a phrase), to the wrong person.


I wouldn't go that far, personally, although I do think Kurt is more self-centered and when push comes to shove, would put his own ambition first while Blaine would put Kurt first.

I think Kurt cares about Blaine (enough to put his own not insubstantial ego aside and buy him congratulatory flowers on the Tony audition), maybe really loves him, but I don't think Kurt is as all-encompassingly "in love" with and devoted to Blaine as vice versa.

Although whether that makes Kurt a colder person or Blaine a weaker and needier one is up to interpretation. Personally, I think there might be a little bit of both, and there is something to be said for Kurt having interests and people he's close with aside from his relationship with Blaine, while Kurt still seems to be the only member of ND Blaine has more than a superficial bond with.

If Blaine is going to be reduced to a puddle of angry tears over texting to Chandler, there is no way he's going to survive Kurt being in the Big Apple. IMO.


No argument here. This episode honestly made me worry a bit about Blaine's emotional state when Kurt is gone. I don't think it's not understandable....he really is in kind of a crappy position, but he's not taking it well.

More than anything else, the emotion the episode gave me re: Blaine was pity.

Edited by Jester85, Apr 27, 2012 @ 1:54 AM.

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#16797

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 2:24 AM

Well if you want to assign all the blame in this drama to one person, (initial Kurt Hummell) than yes, per your premise, they should break up.

I have not just blamed Kurt for this drama - but I do blame him more. I do blame Blaine for this: "I will say that Blaine should have talked to Kurt sooner about his insecurities" - but that discussion would be a difficult one to broach, especially for a teenager. Any teenager. Add the fact that Blaine is still apparently not great at expressing his feelings to Kurt and we get drama. Not good drama, but drama.

If Blaine is going to be reduced to a puddle of angry tears over texting to Chandler, there is no way he's going to survive Kurt being in the Big Apple. IMO.

Since the show is probably not going to devote any significant story time to Kurt & Blaine development for the rest of the season, chances are pretty good they are not going to last. Relationships are hard, they require maintenance. Long distance relationships are exponentially difficult, both in my experience and in my opinion.
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#16798

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 3:12 AM

Since the show is probably not going to devote any significant story time to Kurt & Blaine development for the rest of the season, chances are pretty good they are not going to last.


Hmm, see I'm of the opposite mind. I think this would be more of a possibility if they'd left the situation unsettled at the end of the last episode. Let's face it, it was doable...what with Kurt for a good portion of the episode convinced he wasn't doing anything wrong and all the stuff he threw in Blaine's face about being his boyfriend. I feel like if the show was leading to a break up, they either would have made it happen there or left things ambiguous and in the air.

I know this is Glee and they do random shit but I can't see them giving the pairing some focus, only to let them talk out their issues and make up, then ignore their relationship for the rest of the season and then they just randomly break up. Again, not entirely impossible because this is Glee but it'd be surprising. I guess they could pull it as a shocking season finale surprise or whatever but I'm not totally sold on that's where their story is going. Also, if nothing else
Spoiler

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#16799

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 3:17 AM

I'm not thinking a breakup before the season is over. I'm thinking they break up before Kurt leaves for New York over the summer. I could be completely wrong (and I have been many times with this ridiculous show).

Just as Rachel and Kurt didn't know that Julliard didn't have a musical theater program, I am completely convinced they have NO IDEA how much time and work a major in theater requires. It's a whole lot of time for very little class credit.

Edited by cmstevens, Apr 27, 2012 @ 3:21 AM.

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#16800

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 3:57 AM

I think Kurt cares about Blaine (enough to put his own not insubstantial ego aside and buy him congratulatory flowers on the Tony audition), maybe really loves him, but I don't think Kurt is as all-encompassingly "in love" with and devoted to Blaine as vice versa.


I think Kurt would leave Blaine at the drop of a hat if it served his purposes. He would also make it quite clear that it was all Blaine's fault, because Kurt rarely acknowledges that he does anything wrong. I thought the whole "my life was so much better" before you transferred to this school was particularly vicious. That was a mis step in the writing for me, because I lost any sympathy for Kurt that I might have had.

It would be better for Blaine if they did break up, because he needs to find his own feet. He's far too dependent on Kurt for approval, acclaim and support. Kurt's instincts when he thought Blaine was pulling away from him was to go and find someone else to give him compliments and make him feel special. Thus proving that whilst it would be nice if Blaine did that - it's not particularly essential, it just needs to be someone. Meanwhile, Blaine is desperately trying to work out how he's going to live without "the love of his life". This is not a balanced equation.

Ryan Murphy said that he hadn't decided if Blaine's heart was going to be broken or not. I think this episode signals that he has made his mind up and it doesn't bode well for Blaine. I think pity is the right emotion for him at the moment, because he's clearly now this insecure and needy boy who doesn't appear to have the resources to cope on his own. It could be a good dramatic arc for the next season if they wanted to show him growing up and becoming more independent without Kurt but I still can't see the writers spending that much time or investing that much in his character.
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