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The Killing: Forbrydelsen Comes to AMC


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#3421

spencerriley

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 4:53 PM

Can someone who has seen the original please PM me and let me know who the killer was? I know that the show runners have said they are going to have a different killer but I just took this show off my TiVo season pass. Even with Jacob writing an amazing recap this week I think I 'm done with this show and knowing who the original killer is will give me a little closure.
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#3422

Snookums

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 5:27 PM

Okay, question:

It that kid Holder's talking to his son or his nephew? I was under the impression it was the latter, and his sister and that kid were all the family he had and he was thus close to them before all the meth badness.
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#3423

dubbel zout

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 6:33 PM

The kid is his nephew, Snookums. When Holder was using, he sold a signed baseball (I think) of his nephew's to buy drugs. That's one of the reasons for the uneasiness between Holder and his family.
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#3424

kieyra

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Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 9:02 PM

Regarding the ending of the Danish original:

(Major spoiler for Forbrydelsen (well, the biggest possible spoiler, so you've been warned), potentially spoilery for U.S.):

Spoiler

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#3425

Cunegonde

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 3:45 AM

BBDj
With regard to the inherent misogyny, I think that's just the writers way of trying to make the show dark and edgy, so that there are no 'good' mothers or trusting girlfriends, and that everyone is dysfunctional or hiding something. I suspect that is what they are doing but they are just not good enough to pull that off and still make the characters engaging and sympathetic.


Agree with the first part completely, disagree with the second part. I think the writing on this show, in comparison to the types of shows that have come before it (anything from Twin Peaks to Law and Order types, we'll say) is far more interesting and masterful. So I wouldn't blame misogyny for the character dynamics as much as I'd blame scripted convention and cliche; The Killing is only in season 2, so my guess is the show runner wants to go with dynamics with that viewers recognize. All these cliches and conventions are far more easily broken when the show is on more stable ground with the network and its audience.

Re: Terri the aunt from hell. I wonder if part of the story arc is that Stan and/or Mitch find out what Terri had to do with getting Rosie into places where she should not have been.


I think this is totally on the money.

I so agree with StillShimpy that the whole Terri v Mitch thing, with the "You didn't even call her all weekend" and then "I got her a fake ID because Mitch never let her do anything" made absolutely NO sense. That was just plain shitty writing and character development.


Disagreed. I think Terri's outbursts coupled with close living quarters make the story not only plausible, but more interesting. On the one hand, Terri's niece is dead and Mitch and Terri shared the majority of the "child rearing" responsibilities - except Terri is still just 'the aunt.' She's not the wife, monetary provider, and/or legal guardian - for anyone. She is for the most part alone. This leaves open a NUMBER of possibilities (including Terri as a fascinating suspect) so I don't want to declare "bad writing!" before Terri has been fully revealed as a character. I think in this case "bad writing!" is a term I'll apply only after we know who the killer is. (Unless we're talking shit like that episode where we were subjected to Holder and Linden chasing Jack for like 67 hours without ANY BREAK TO SOMETHING ACTUALLY RELATED TO THE SHOW - blargh.)

Anyhoo, IMO what Terri said to Mitch wasn't out of character although it certainly was insensitive. I imagine Mitch and Terri have quite a history as sisters that has yet to come out. Would Rosie still be alive if Mitch had called her? Maybe. Probably not. Terri made the statement because she was angry and knew how to get a rise out of Mitch. Again, we still know so little about their past as sisters - and even less about how Stan met Mitch and what those circumstances were (or what they were like for Terri.) More stuff: why is Terri living with them? When did that begin? How involved is she with Stan's old friends, given that Stan's old friends had a stake in the prostitution hub? Did Rosie remind Terri of either herself or Mitch at 17? Did someone Terri had fallen for at the escort service prefer Rosie? And how involved was she in Rosie's life - either her secret life or the one her parents were aware of?

I need those questions answered first. No idea when and if that'll happen, but I think (hope) it'll be a fun ride
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#3426

spencerriley

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 10:06 AM

Regarding the ending of the Danish original:

(Major spoiler for Forbrydelsen (well, the biggest possible spoiler, so you've been warned), potentially spoilery for U.S.):


Thanks Kieyra!
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#3427

BBDi

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 10:45 AM

[quote]Regarding the ending of the Danish original:



Although,
Spoiler


Question about the Danish original...It's not really a spoiler, but I'll put on bars just in case...
Spoiler

Edited by BBDi, Apr 12, 2012 @ 10:46 AM.

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#3428

stillshimpy

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 11:05 AM

Anyhoo, IMO what Terri said to Mitch wasn't out of character although it certainly was insensitive


In fairness to the writing I'm about to point out something that contradicts my earlier point, if not entirely. In fairness, Terri uttered that line before Rosie had been found dead. For all Mitch or Stan knew, she was holed up with her boyfriend at that stage. When Terri asks that question, the only person in the room who knows that Rosie is indeed up to some truly perilous stuff? Is Terri.

So I actually have to give a continuity nod while still calling horse shit on that question. Specifically that Terri would be freaking out in her own private hell and would be the least likely person at that moment to wonder why Mitch didn't call...because she should have been stuffed in a closet somewhere, trying to call every Beau Soleil contact she had, trying to find out where Rosie really was.

It both fits and doesn't fit. Terri alone would be in possession of the knowledge that Rosie was not the perfect, studious kid that Mitch and Stan believed her to be, which was why they thought they could go camping for a weekend and Rosie wouldn't get up to too much (she was supposed to be at a friends, not staying at home by herself). So Terri would be the person who was worried. However, since Terri got Rosie into ...oh lord, I really just don't even want to think about what sort of person might introduce their teenage niece to the wonderful world of hooking...but anyway, Terri seems to have known Rosie was working for Beau Soleil. So she wouldn't be standing around asking Mitch questions like that, she's be racing off to wherever, making frantic calls...because she alone should know how likely it was that Rosie was dead.

Like I said, it both fits and doesn't fit.

Also, I said there were undertones and overtones of misogyny, which is not quite the same thing as thinking the story is misogynistic. There haven't been a lot of good, decent caring characters in this series as it stands. However, the ones we have seen? Split down the middle. The crabber who saved Richmond and then held his tongue seemed a good man. Poor beaten Bennet was ...maybe...a good man (yeah there's the stuff with his students that adds kind of a big question mark there). Richmond himself turns out to have been primarily a good man. Linden's social worker was a near saint and clearly did everything she could for Linden. The DA is the only person to seemingly care that the real killer is found and dropped the charges. There actually have been a few characters that haven't been terrible.

However in the "that's a person with no redeeming value, whatsoever" most are men. I'm discounting Mitch in this, because the Mitch we met is a Mitch who is utterly, completely destroyed by grief. What people don't tell you about grief is that it isn't just an emotion based in sadness, it's a very, very angry emotion when it involves something like murder or a violent accident. Grief can make you a stranger to yourself. So the Mitch we met, we briefly saw laughing at the busted pipe before she underwent an emotional assault that has caused her to become Mitch, the Grief Stricken and also Outraged.

It's just that the truly heinous human beings in this, the ones with the blinking neon "Looky, a villain!" light? Tend to be men. Sure, there was Belko's mother (eek), but there was the gas station guy (ignoring the screams of a terrified girl because he had inventory to do), there was the guy with the swimming pool in his ceiling that actually beat up one of the prostitutes and had underage girls swimming over his head (the guy with all the money). There's the mayor and his charming assistant.

Most of the "wow, you read as a truly bad person" stuff ...most of them are men. That's not even touching Stan's old mob boss. By the time Stan finds out how many people he personally knows that help put Rosie in a position to be murdered -- Terri and then his old boss being chief among them -- the man may just short-circuit himself and go off to tour the motel pools of the pacific Northwest too -- because wow. His ex mob-boss seems to have employed his teenage daughter as a hooker. Stan looks poised to have a sexual relationship with the woman who is so damaged, she thinks of prostituting herself as a means to get neat stuff. Plus, it looks for all the world that he's also hired someone very closely tied to Rosie's murder.

Last season seems to have been the season of "Let's vilify Mitch! It's all her fault!" This season really seems to be shaping up into "Actually, just having Stan for a father was one of the things that doomed Rosie." Looks like there's a change in the blame wind and the writers might be trying to even things out a bit.

Edited by stillshimpy, Apr 12, 2012 @ 11:09 AM.

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#3429

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Posted Apr 12, 2012 @ 9:43 PM

stillshimpy, excellent analysis.

As I said in an earlier post I'd certainly listen to any arguements for misandric tones in the show--just because the women characters are being presented in lights that refuse to cut them any slack certainly doesn't make it untrue of the male ones.

And of course, the whole point of the show is to present how the creepy secrets everyone is keeping all traced and trailed their poisonous tendrils until they ensnared and murdered an innocent--Rosie. It's just that the tendrils are starting to strangle the characters to the point that it's hard to find anybody to root for! I don't need cardboard villians and knights--I'm all for shades of grey, and it is refreshing to see a female lead that doesn't use "being nice" as her default persona. But I do need some shades besides greys in there. People aren't just ambiguous all the time in every situation.
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#3430

Crim

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 6:41 AM

Question about the Danish original...

Spoiler

In my opinion, no. There were some elements (disclaimer: I'm no longer watching the US version so I'm not able to say that the Danish version had less of this) but they were a side story, which I found very satisfying in its own right because the characters were great. Side note: The second season of Forbrydelsen had a different approach of the matter, so maybe the US version was... inspired by that. It'd be nice if it was planned long-term instead of just part of the fail!dark and fail!edgy thing TPTB attempted, which was what turned me off the show in early season 1, and which is very nicely put by Snookums just above.

Edited by Crim, Apr 13, 2012 @ 6:44 AM.

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#3431

stillshimpy

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 3:03 PM

It's just that the tendrils are starting to strangle the characters to the point that it's hard to find anybody to root for! I don't need cardboard villians and knights--I'm all for shades of grey, and it is refreshing to see a female lead that doesn't use "being nice" as her default persona. But I do need some shades besides greys in there. People aren't just ambiguous all the time in every situation.


I am completely with you on that, Snookums. It isn't that I need a world rendered in simplistic black and white in order to invest, but in order to care about Rosie and her murder, I need to feel her loss keenly. Right now it's almost down to the "Yeah, it isn't so much that I care it's that I'm stubborn and I still want to know who killed that poor kid." It's difficult when you are introduced to a character after his or her life has ended. In this case, I sort of "met" Rosie, and I'm not in the least ashamed to admit, I cried when they found her body. I am so far from the ungettable-get when it comes to making me care about fictional characters. I'm pretty much primed and ready to go, just give me a reason.

Then the story sort of marched on and the weirdest thing happened, I felt an emotional distance to the entire concept growing and growing. It's partially that they made Rosie into someone who really couldn't have existed. The super-bright, somewhat idealistic (judging from all the butterflies and sparkly backpacks, she seemed a sweet person) person ...who was also an escort? Who spent weekends at a Casino (even though I'm assured she was never allowed to do anything) and had time to deposit a lot of money in an account before she died. In between that she made Super 8 films, apparently expressed interest in religious exploration and I think wrote poetry too. I won't go over every last detail, but there came a point when Rosie stopped seeming real. Where she started to have the feeling of a purely fictional construct.

I think that's why I need some people in the story to sympathize with, to have compassion for and hell, even just to like. Weirdly, I do like Linden and Holder, even if I could just about scream with frustration over how neglected Jack currently is, I like Linden. I've known more people in my life that were like Linden -- emotionally distant, quiet, internal, seemingly without a lot of humor -- than I've known people like Rosie. Linden may be a bit maddening, but I recognize shades of a real person within her. They might not have been my favorite people, but I've seen her type in real life.

But I don't like the "Whose fault was it that Rosie died?" thing the story does with the people mourning her. I want a safe to drop on Terri's head at this point. I ought to be allowed to like one of the Larsens for more than six seconds straight. Just when I'm thinking, "Maybe Stan is a good enough guy..." because he's not tearing his wife to shreds for having left...he then goes and does something that will cause more trouble, "I know, let's involve my old mob boss!"

I need someone to care about and fewer reasons within the story to think what is essentially unthinkable: that this story is saying that everyone, Rosie and her parents included, seemingly brought all this on themselves in some capacity. I want my heart to just be breaking for Mitch, not wondering what in the hell she could possibly be thinking that is causing her to do these things. Same thing with Stan. Terri there is somewhat less hope for, because she just makes me angry on a lot of levels.

Anyway, I agree with you. I just want to ...if not root for or hope for...I just want to feel for these characters in a way that brings across the tragedy. The story is that a seventeen year old girl was murdered in a way that blows my mind, it's so horrible. That isn't just a mystery, that is one of the most tragic things I can imagine happening to any person, or family, or community.

Instead of inviting me in, so that I really deeply, deeply care this show keeps making me want to run off and take a shower after watching it, while thanking everything in the universe that I don't know any of those people, or even people who resemble them in action or word. I watched Veronic Mars (just to use an example) and I deeply freaking cared who killed Lily because she was vibrantly alive. I felt the loss. No one involved was perfect or so sugar coated that they sainted, but I still felt the magnitude of that person's loss and cared, "Who killed her? Who robbed the world like that?"

That's what I want to feel for Rosie. I want to feel pissed off that someone took her away from the world and left such aching pain behind. I want to care about the mystery in that "I want to see that person caught and sent to justice." way. I don't just want a whodunnit, I want a "How dare you? Get 'em!" I think the show did a good job of that at first. I even understood why Linden just couldn't leave town until she'd caught the person who did this.

But they lost that for me by making Rosie seem less and less likely (apparently she even had time to be politically involved!) and the people mourning her were doing so ...so selfishly that it was off-putting.

Edited by stillshimpy, Apr 13, 2012 @ 3:07 PM.

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#3432

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 6:37 PM

This show has moved to the OK To Miss for me--meaning I am still watching--the day after On Demand--but if real life gets in the way, this show will be one of the first go.
The Killing American edition is like Twin Peaks without the fun.
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#3433

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 8:59 PM

Then the story sort of marched on and the weirdest thing happened, I felt an emotional distance to the entire concept growing and growing. It's partially that they made Rosie into someone who really couldn't have existed. The super-bright, somewhat idealistic (judging from all the butterflies and sparkly backpacks, she seemed a sweet person) person ...who was also an escort? Who spent weekends at a Casino (even though I'm assured she was never allowed to do anything) and had time to deposit a lot of money in an account before she died. In between that she made Super 8 films, apparently expressed interest in religious exploration and I think wrote poetry too. I won't go over every last detail, but there came a point when Rosie stopped seeming real. Where she started to have the feeling of a purely fictional construct.


I still believe that Rosie will ultimately be found to have been doing something altruistic, rather than turning tricks. That's just a strong feeling I have and it seems consistent with how the plotting works. It doesn't really matter that much to me if this turns out to be the chase because they haven't been giving us enough crumbs or bits of insight to have an attachment to her.
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#3434

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 9:28 PM

I think the problem with this show boils down to that it got suckered into chasing after some false ideal of the supposed authenticity of grief and forgot to make the story interesting. I love the comparison to Veronica Mars - Lily was a character with many flaws and she was a bit larger than life than a real teenage girl, but she still felt believable and her loss was really sad - part of that was the skillful use of flashbacks and part of that was that we could feel how much Veronica missed her and had cared for her. Even though they are showing us how debilitated the Larsens are by grief, they aren't really showing us how much they truly cared for Rosie, as a person, as herself - it always seems like they are grieving for their own loss, for their own feeling of sadness, not for Rosie, if that makes any sense. There is something selfish, inward-directed about their grief. In some ways, I can see why people might praise the authenticity of that, but it is just so unpleasant, it gives the viewer nothing to latch onto to keep them invested in the story.
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#3435

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Posted Apr 13, 2012 @ 9:52 PM

I don't care about being fooled; I care about being bored. I was bored for approximately 50 of the 60 minutes even while I marveled at the acting.


First time posting on this show, I so agree with this. I really want this show to be good but it's not. It is so boring. I find myself watching and having to rewind or just completely zoning out. It's like nothing ever happens. The way it's shot annoys me. It looks like it's in black and white, the low voices..Uuugh. Sometimes I turn my TV up so loud I almost have a heart attack when the commercials come on.

I agree that they haven't given us any insight into Rosie, I don't care about the character enough to care who killed her.
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#3436

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 12:23 PM

Where she started to have the feeling of a purely fictional construct.


Exactly. Shapeshifter's comment about Twin Peaks "without the fun" and BBD's about Rosie turning out to have been doing something altruistic with the money tie right in here.

Twin Peak's Laura Palmer famously led a similar double life in "idyllic" small town that seethed with lust, sin, and unquiet spirits. While it's really not fair to compare the two shows--they have completely different themes and tones--I started to have a similar problem with Laura's character that I am with Rosie's: when the hell was she finding the time to do all this?

I know people all have private sides and concerns that even their nearest and dearest don't know about, but there's still only twenty four hours in a day. For Rosie to be an honors student AND sneak out to the casinos AND make films AND volunteer for Richmond AND date Jasper AND go to dances AND drop books off at her teacher's house AND apparently try to help young girls escape to Canada AND get herself onto the Beau Soliel website--when did this girl sleep?? And even if her family was out of cell phone range for one weekend, they apparently were pretty close the rest of the time--none of them EVER noticed her sneaking out at all hours? Does she have a private time machine? Can she cast a sleeping spell on anybody around her so she can sneak off?

And if she was trying to get money for an "unselfish" reason--either it's something we've already seen, like Richmond's campaign (and I would hope any staffer worth a damn would question a donation of thousands of dollars from a teenage girl) or sneaking the girls to Canada, or it has to be YET ANOTHER "secret" that we haven't seen yet, which just strains the disbelief further.

Rosie is a lot of things on this show--a dichotomy, a virgin/whore, a mystery, and a catalyst. One thing she isn't is a character.
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#3437

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 12:49 PM

Rosie is a lot of things on this show--a dichotomy, a virgin/whore, a mystery, and a catalyst. One thing she isn't is a character.

Can't argue with that, but for me it's a minor failing, since she doesn't exist, either.

As for the personages who do exist, I find I believe them as characters. I care far less about who killed Rosie than I care about Linden and her guilt over her false leads, Holder and his humiliation that he's been "played," and Stan over his fury at what looks to him to be an incompetent investigation. Those emotions feel real to me, and they engage me. I find myself actually rooting (silently, but passionately) for Linden and Holder to get back together again and bring the bad guy (or gal) to justice. I don't care who that bad guy/gal is--I'm not at all concerned with satisfying my curiosity on that (which may be why I was perfectly satisfied with last season); the reason I want the case solved is for Linden and Holder and Stan, and because of them, I'm totally into the show.

Edited by Milburn Stone, Apr 14, 2012 @ 12:49 PM.

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#3438

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Posted Apr 14, 2012 @ 6:46 PM

ITA, Milburn Stone. I care about how Rosie's death has impacted the Larsen family (even Mitch, though I'm less interested in her than Stan). I never got the impression (as mentioned upthread) that Mitch is being blamed by the show for Stan's poor decisions. These are flawed people who are turning away from each other in their grief and striking out. It doesn't make Mitch likable, mainly because of the two boys, but I think she's having some kind of emotional breakdown.

It was good to hear that someone in this town noticed the sloppy police work and called them on it! Linden is weirdly fascinating to me - bad mothering, reserved and distant yet she'll tell Stan that "they've caught the guy", obsessive and all that. I want to see where this case takes her and Holder - not as a conspiracy, I don't want to see that and I'm worried it looks like that's where they're going - but where it takes them personally and how it impacts their careers. Linden is at her best working with Holder, who is far and away my favorite character. He broke my heart sitting outside Linden's door and in the scene with his nephew.

Ugh, don't care at all about the politics. The show drags to a halt for me in those scenes. Richmond and Gwen can go away at any time but Jaimie can stay. His support of Richmond is so intense and a bit beyond friendship/loyalty (maybe a crush or something). He's the most interesting of the political group IMO.

Edited by Kolaka, Apr 14, 2012 @ 6:47 PM.

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#3439

stillshimpy

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 9:45 AM

As for the personages who do exist, I find I believe them as characters. I care far less about who killed Rosie than I care about Linden and her guilt over her false leads, Holder and his humiliation that he's been "played," and Stan over his fury at what looks to him to be an incompetent investigation.


Milburn Stone, that pinpoints for me one of the reasons I just have kept watching. I don't watch things I just plain old hate, although I've been known to stick with a series simply to see the end even if it has started to suck (Buffy season seven springs to mind very easily), but I only do that with stories I've loved so much I'm committed to seeing it through. That's not the case here with The Killing. I ended up tuning back in because a) I am stubborn, I do want to know who killed that poor kid b) I cared enough about Linden in particular to want to see how it ended.

It isn't that I like her, it's that I found and find her interesting. For me she's a good example of how a character doesn't have to be particularly likable to hold my interest. I liked and even understood that Linden was willing to wreck the foundation of her entire freaking life in pursuit of this. Almost from word one, she's been driven. She ruined her romantic relationship, as much as I hate Neglected Jack as a story, Linden is so damned driven that she can recognize "I'm kind of face-planting on this, parenting my kid, but I can't stop." ...and she still doesn't stop.

Not seemingly because she has such a great, personally affinity for Rosie, but because she will know no peace until the killer is found. There was a moment last season -- and unfortunately it was built on story elements that I had to willfully ignore (with only partial success) that revealed something kind of fascinating to me about Linden -- when Linden stands in the field and realized, "He hunted her" (part you have to ignore, this means that the screaming in the back of the gas station went on for an absurdly long time) "if she'd turned the other way, she would have lived". The part that really got me? It reminded me of a movie I saw at least twenty years ago Manhunter. One of the creepiest damned movies ever. It's actually the first appearance onscreen of the character of Hannibal Lecter (played by an entirely different actor than Hopkins, who did a really solid, terrifying job) and the FBI agent who originally managed to catch him.

The FBI agent's particular gift is not that he notices every damned thing and sifts clues, it's that he's able to think like the killer. It's a horrible, horrible gift and has come close to almost personally destroying him. I highly recommend the movie if you are looking to flip your wig with "OMG!!" at several turns. That's what that moment reminded me of with Linden. Was she seeing things from Rosie's eyes? It really didn't seem like it. It seemed like she was able to think like whoever killed her at that moment. I think that's the moment where, whether I realized it or not, I was going to be back for this season. It would be such a damned curse to possess even an iota of that kind of gift. I'm one of those people who reads about horrible crime and the edges of my mind shrivel up and my brain stalls. I deeply don't get it at a core level and I'm so glad that I don't.

In that moment onscreen, I thought I saw the glimmer of what is driving Linden to ruin her entire life. To risk her son and possibly her own life too. It isn't some crusader's quest for justice, with a shining badge, it's that somewhere within her is basically the ability to understand how people do horrific and horrible things. That until she finds the killer, that demon is awakened.

Now, that could all be wishful thinking on my part. The story sometimes supports that and sometimes doesn't. But that's why I'm still here. I'd like it if I could feel the tragic loss of this young girl, that's my point of empathy, the thing that would hook me and just make me not care when things don't add up properly. However, the thing that keeps me hanging on even with a lot of story frustration is...I want to see Linden solve the case. Not because I like her in "Hey, we should totally grab lunch, you seem like such a fascinating person!" way, but rather whereas I can't feel the tragedy of Rosie...I kind of feel the tragedy of Linden. She cannot stop. Not for pretty "I protect the American way of life! Apple pie and sunny field mean a lot to me!" but in much darker, "...I will be destroyed and burned to the ground on the interior if I do not." level.

I know Enos performance leaves a lot of people cold and I take no issue with that. It absolutely isn't a big, inviting or engaging performance on any of the usual levels for me. In fact, I think I actually might be super-imposing a lot of that onto the character, based on the movie that I liked a lot...but it's working for me and has (she admits with some chagrin) made me actually invested enough that...hey, I'm here and apparently? Not going anywhere.

ETA: Son of a plum, the internal server errors are hungry this morning. Copy text before hitting reply, folks!
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#3440

djsunyc

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 9:02 PM

So Stan's past has come back to potentially haunt him...
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#3441

Luciaphile

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 9:55 PM

Was I the only one who was laughing at Linden's surprise that her ex was suing for joint custody?
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#3442

LisaM

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 10:37 PM

The political story is still deadly boring. Every time that Richmond came on screen, I played with my phone.

The Rosie murder mystery is finally beginning to pick up steam. I liked seeing Sterling (I think that is her name) again as well as Jasper and his father. The tie in to the man who Stan killed years ago rang true as a motive for murder. Interesting how Tommy locked his brother in the trunk, a la Rosie and the guy that Stan killed.

Also glad to see that Jack's father recognizes (how?) that Linden is neglecting their son.
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#3443

erformc

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 11:10 PM

Who did Mitch call & hang up on?
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#3444

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Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 11:14 PM

I still feel very forgiving towards Linden. Her reasons for not paying attention to her son are better than most. She's not out abusing drugs, having affairs, etc. She's trying to find a murderer. And though the father asking for custody isn't surprising, it's such a dicky move for someone who wasn't there for much of the time. I feel like boys are more forgiving of this behavior from a mother, than a daughter would be. And also, some parents are mentally absent from their children, even when they're around them all the time. So, I don't view Linden as a particularly bad mother. Workaholic, yes.

The overall theme of this show seems to be to show the emotional toll of a murder, even on peripheral characters. Which is done really well. Reminds me of Breaking Bad, and how one means to an end, could end up causing a plane crash. This is also a show where things that seem uninteresting might seem more interesting upon a second viewing, when we know who the murderer(s) is/are. I think he's an excellent example of crime resulting in crime resulting in crime. And now a man who had a huge future, and seems like a decent man, had to pay a serious price. The ending emphasized that point, where you see the woman confront Stan. She is so ruined from a crime that happened 17 years ago, that she feels no sadness for a murdered teenage girl, and the girl's father.

I don't think Rosie's actions seem that suspicious so far. She was leading a double life for sure. But again, we don't know the crime she was investigating, so we don't have enough info yet.
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#3445

Dowel Jones

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Posted Apr 16, 2012 @ 12:09 AM

I watched it live (AMC has a lot! of commercials) so I can't go back and rewatch until tomorrow, but was that Pyotr's mother at the end, confronting Stan? Or maybe some other relative? I had to say "wow" when Stan told Tommy to smack the next guy who got in his face. Welcome to the family, Tommy.

On the lighter side, I got two good laughs (well, three if you count the world's longest street piss) out of Holder: "You buying Jack's dinner", and ".... Tom Waits wannabe..."

Edited by Dowel Jones, Apr 16, 2012 @ 12:10 AM.

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#3446

Snookums

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Posted Apr 16, 2012 @ 1:55 AM

The Rosie murder mystery is finally beginning to pick up steam.


The Killing--goes from zero to sixty in about a season.


This one finally seemed to be going somewhere! Plots! Clues! The past coming back to haunt seemingly good men! Finding out Tattoo Boy was Stan's long ago possible murder victim's kid was really very good. Plus, he clearly had been stalking Rosie, who had everything Stan took from him.

The problem is, I can't get too excited because I know from past experience Tattoo cannot be the murderer. He might know something about it, but I doubt he's the "one."
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#3447

Luciaphile

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Posted Apr 16, 2012 @ 7:47 AM

Her reasons for not paying attention to her son are better than most. She's not out abusing drugs, having affairs, etc. She's trying to find a murderer.


That's her job. She could be a brain surgeon and that would be an equally important type of job. She's also a parent and should be providing a safe stable home for her child as well as regular meals that do not come out of a vending machine. I don't know what the situation with the ex is. But she doesn't seem to have a lot of friends and family. She's a product of the foster system. Unless the ex is unsafe or abusive, I'd think she'd want her son to have a safe stable environment while she focuses on doing her job.

I find myself sticking around to watch Betty Draper's brother there. The actor is really quite good.
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#3448

nosud

nosud

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Posted Apr 16, 2012 @ 7:49 AM

I have a question and a comment:

Question: Were we ever given a reason why Holder switched out the backpacks in the first place?

Comment: Ol' Richmond sure did bounce back from being on the edge of death, with a 12+ hour surgery to save his life . . . in 3 days. Apart from the paralysis, he seems totally healed from his life threatening gunshot wound . . . in 3 days.

A lot sure has happened in 17 days.
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#3449

Dowel Jones

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Posted Apr 16, 2012 @ 8:26 AM

I thought he did it because he suspected (rightly) that there was some corruption in the upper ranks, and switching backpacks proved it. As far as Richmond goes, I was fully expecting some major hemmorhage to occur as they were trying to get him out of bed, but no. Must have been one of those magic bullets that damages only what the plot says to damage.<BR>
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#3450

mayact4

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Posted Apr 16, 2012 @ 8:58 AM

Did anyone else find it pretty unrealistic that the kids at school would be teasing Tommy about having a dead sister? I know kids can be mean, but that's over the top.
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