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#16247183

Cindy McLennan

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Posted Jan 19, 2014 @ 7:21 PM

Sherlock fans who are watching on the U.S. schedule, season 3 premieres tonight. We have a brand new forum for it (and UK schedule viewers are welcome to post, provided they don't spoil people). For some reason, the new forum is not yet linked in the forum pulldown menu. I have already reported this and (after posting this) will remind the staff that the new forum still needs to be added to the pulldown.

In the meantime, if you want to discuss Sherlock on the U.S. schedule, please come over to the new forum.

Edited by TWoP Pembleton, Jan 19, 2014 @ 9:56 PM.


#31

Mr. Excitement

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 1:44 PM

Cress writes:


Glad you guys enjoyed it. I can hardly wait for PBS to air it.



Yes. Fortunately, PBS has announced their airdate (the week of October 24).
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#32

susiej

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 5:11 PM

Loved it, loved it, loved it. It was yummy from start to end. I've always loved Benedict Cumberbatch in everything and this was Martin Freeman at his best since the Office. And Mark Gatiss is, of course, a genius. And speaking of whom, apart from obvious similarities to the new Dr Who, I felt it had strong resemblances to The Avengers, especially in the scene where Watson is taken to meet the mysterious Gatiss for the first time (loved the woman assistant too). This, in my view, is only a Good Thing. Hurrah!
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#33

darkestboy

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 5:19 PM

Just watched Sherlock there and I was bloody impressed.

Unlike some people, I never expected to see a certain Doctor so Mark Gatiss was a nice twist, though I'm still wondering if he'll end up being a certain someone else.

Benedict Cumberbatch made for a great Sherlock and definitely gave off a lot of Doctorish vibes but Martin Freeman was better as Watson.

Looking forward to the next two episodes though.

And the Moff certainly is clever. This episode was a headtrip and a half.

The serial killer angle was inspired and Phil Davis managed to be menacing and pathetic all at once.
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#34

John Potts

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 5:34 PM

Although I didn't mind the updating, it did seem rather derivative - I kept thinking of House whenever Holmes was being brilliant-but-obnoxious and when Tritter - sorry, Lestrade - was turning over his house looking for drugs (OK, obviously that's a little unfair given that House is itself based on Holmes) and I couldn't help thinking of The Princess Bride at the end (would have loved it had Holmes or the cabbie mentioned the poison was Iocanine powder - "I'd stake my life on it!"). Did like the way Watson's limp was proven to be psychosomatic (I wonder if that was a reference to the fact that Doyle's Watson's injury varied according to the story) when he managed to chase the cab through the backstreets.

But there were a number of things that bugged me - exactly how does Holmes live? Doyle's Holmes was a private detective (although money is never actually mentioned in the stories) but here he just solves crimes "for fun." Mrs Hudson might let him live rent-free at her place but can he really have earned enough favours to pay for his food and clothing (to say nothing of his nicotine patches!)? Holmes might be asexual, but he isn't oblivious to women (I would have expected him to say something like "Did you really think pink lipstick would attract me to you?" or something similar, only crueller). I too got the cabbie was the murderer as soon as Mrs Hudson brought it up (someone unknown has turned up and the phone is now here? It doesn't take a genius to work it out). And I really hate it when the police are portrayed as idiots - come on, Dr Watson (an ex soldier!) miraculously turns up at the crime scene and they don't make the connection? OK, so Watson would probably be in trouble for keeping what was presumably his old service sidearm, but it was entirely reasonable to shoot the guy in that circumstance.

overdedge Also, nice misdirection with the brother since I am sure most people probably assumed he was Moriarty

Not sure we can necessarily rule it out - he did describe himself as Holmes' arch-nemesis after all, and Moriarty could be a cover name (Sherlock described him as "the CIA", so a cover name is perfectly reasonable and Sherlock didn't recognise the name Moriarty).
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#35

Cress

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 5:38 PM

Yes. Fortunately, PBS has announced their airdate (the week of October 24).


Yay that they announced it. Boo that it's so far away. I guess I should stop hanging out on this thread to avoid spoilers, but maybe I'll forget everything by the time October comes around.
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#36

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 6:39 PM

And I really hate it when the police are portrayed as idiots - come on, Dr Watson (an ex soldier!) miraculously turns up at the crime scene and they don't make the connection?


The cops didn't know he was ex-army; they do know he's Sherlock's colleague and flatmate, and is apparently concerned for his welfare given the traumatic situation.

And they're supposed to be thick, Sherlock bloody Holmes is there to do the thinking!
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#37

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 9:38 PM

I'm very sorry that this is only a three episode show because I loved the heck out of that! The chemistry between the leads was instantaneous and palatable. I really had to laugh at Mrs. Hudson's assumption that they wouldn't need that extra bed. The café owner with the candle was another bright spot. Loved it when Sherlock realized he was describing Watson to LaStrade as the shooter of the cabbie and immediately took it all back by blaming shock.

Can hardly wait for the next episode and hope that the third episode won't be the last we see of them.
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#38

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 10:26 PM

Boy, this was a delight! The characterizations are cracking, the updating of Holmes is very clever, and the whole Holmes/Watson dynamic is just right. I also quite liked how they made nods to the original stories -- the use of "RACHE" borrowed from the original Study in Scarlet (although there it did indeed mean "revenge" in German, and Lestrade thought it was "Rachel"), and the observations of Watson's smartphone that were lifted from deductions about his watch in Sign of Four. All in all it was a really smart modern retelling that respected the source material while not being afraid to give it appropriate contemporary twists. I really look forward to the rest of the episodes.

Edited by Tulse, Jul 26, 2010 @ 11:21 PM.

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#39

Marq DeCarabas

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Posted Jul 26, 2010 @ 11:47 PM

and the observations of Watson's smartphone that were lifted from deductions about his watch in Sign of Four.


I wasn't familiar with the source of the deductions but I knew it was from somewhere because honestly? Who engraves a Smartphone?
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#40

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 12:36 AM

That was so, so cute and funny. Loved the modernization while keeping the original spirit of the stories and, more importantly, the characters intact. Cumberbatch's voice (what an odd name) even reminds me of Jeremy Brett's voice who, for me, was the ultimate Holmes.

I think I can now finally forgive Martin Freeman for the abysmal Hitchhiker movie.

W: "That was the most ridiculous thing I've ever done."
H: "You invaded Afghanistan."
W: "That wasn't just me!"

The giggling sold it.

Love the spinet music too. If that's what this is.

"I'm in shock, look I've got a blanket!"

Edited by supposebly, Jul 27, 2010 @ 12:45 AM.

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#41

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 1:36 AM

That was absolutely fantastic. I expected it to be pretty decent, but this was so much better than expected. Loved how competent and solid Watson was, even in the middle of all the craziness, and I was half giggling and half impressed by all the antics by Sherlock. And the throwbacks to the classics - just such great updates. Loved it.

Just three episodes? Noooooo! Any chance there may be another series afterwards?
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#42

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 5:13 AM

Radagast The cops didn't know he was ex-army; they do know he's Sherlock's colleague and flatmate, and is apparently concerned for his welfare given the traumatic situation.

But you'd think they'd ask "How the hell did you get here!?" since he was with Sherlock when they arrived. OK, maybe he could have said "Sherlock rang me and I got a taxi over," but they should at least ask. Sherlock solving crimes because he's brilliant while the police are plodding and methodical is fine, as long as we see the police actually asking the obvious questions. Similarly at the beginning - if you're giving a press conference you'll expect the press to ask if it's a serial killer, so you don't put a cop up there who acts all flustered at the question (and you'd expect a line like "We're keeping all lines of enquiry open").

IIRC, they actually reversed the Rache (revenge) / Rachel from the original "Study in Scarlet", though it was a misdirection by the murderer and not actually a clue. I also really wanted to know if Sherlock had picked the right pill!
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#43

PitofDespair

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 5:41 AM

Glad to see my apprehensions were unfounded--this was a lot of fun. Like really a whole lot of fun. I thought it would be weirder to see the characters transposed to modern times but it really, really worked.

Holmes casually referring to himself as a sociopath kind of threw me. I've always seen him as neuroatypical in a whole host of ways, but sociopathy? I guess we can't accuse the writers of sanitizing the character, but I'd hate to see them go too far in the opposite direction, and play him as a hair's breath from turning into a killer himself. So far, though, they seem to be hitting the right balance. Definitely looking forward to more.
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#44

VioletVisions

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 9:54 AM

Hm... I'm devided on this. I think the modernisation was very well done and the actors have great chemistry. I loved that everyone who seemed friendly towards Holmes just assumed he finally found himself a boyfriend. Liked the chase scene through London, and how he remembered every stop sign - even if it seemed contrived that there was only one possible route.

I had problems understanding Holmes when he was explaining his deductions sometimes, because he talked to fast (I rewound a few times and still didn't get everything). But that might just be because English isn't my native language.

But Watson and the police really come off as thick (and in case of the police, one-dimensionally so). Especially in the scene where they traced the GPS signal to the flat. There's a stranger just walked in, think it might be a good idea to apprehend him? Argh.

And the misdirection with Mycroft didn't work for me at all. The use of state surveillance equipment, basically asking for Watson's intentions towards Holmes, testing Watson's loyalty, "I worry about him." and the hedging admission that Holmes thinks about him like an enemy, but he calls himself the closest thing to a friend he has... Everything screamed out "I'm just looking out for my baby brother." During the whole conversation with Watson I waiting for a line like "Besides, Mother will never forgive me if he gets himself killed." And the whole shady business set-up of the scene and thriller music... They were just trying too hard for that to be the real enemy. I had a little bit of doubt when Holmes described him as "the most dangerous man you'll ever meet" instead of "the most intelligent", but when the cabby started talking about Holmes having a "fan" he doesn't know yet, that sealed it.

And the psychoanalysing of the killer... I don't know. His whole behaviour spelled "psychopath" in glowing letters, yet he loves his kids? I thought that kind of attachment and selfless emotion was impossible for sociopaths/psychopaths. Can you become psychopathic over time?

ETA: I also liked that they made both Holmes and Watson into adrenaline junkies, even if for different reasons. It's an interesting interpretation for Holmes, and a nice change for Watson. In the books, I always got the impression he stayed with Holmes mostly because of some kind of long-suffering old friendship and medical responsibility. But since this is the beginning of their acquaintance the former wouldn't work, and you can't have Holmes being a hard drug addict in this day and age. (Because social attitudes to cocain are much different, evereyone, including Holmes himself, would see it as a weakness. And the only responsible thing for Watson to do would be getting Holmes into rehab, not try to watch over him.) This, together with the PTSD, makes Watson more real to me in this version than he ever was in the books or movies, where he just seemed to be a well-adjusted 'everyman' foil to reflect Holmes' brilliance and character flaws. He's definitely darker here. Even for an ex soldier. Do they train army doctors in marksmanship? I was rather surprised how cool he was with shooting a man. Did Watson ever kill anyone in the original stories?

Edited by VioletVisions, Jul 27, 2010 @ 11:00 AM.

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#45

supposebly

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 12:05 PM

where he just seemed to be a well-adjusted 'everyman' foil to reflect Holmes' brilliance and character flaws. He's definitely darker here. Even for an ex soldier. Do they train army doctors in marksmanship? I was rather surprised how cool he was with shooting a man. Did Watson ever kill anyone in the original stories?

I don't remember him actually ever killing anyone but he was the guy who would bring his revolver. I find it funny that one would see Watson as well-adjusted in the books. He is miserable when we meet him, he has an actual injury, he can't afford a decent place on his own because he has a gambling problem and no job. There are hints that he's quite the ladies' man, too. Maybe, compared to Holmes, even someone like him looks well-adjusted.

I love the adrenaline-junkie Watson, it makes sense. I always wondered why Watson is so fascinated by Holmes in the beginning, especially because he initially thinks Holmes is a show-off. Being bored out of his mind after coming back from the war makes sense. Boring, Holmes is not.

Loved Lestrade, too. I like that he sees Holmes' potential and I like his ruthlessness when he thinks Holmes is hiding something. The police might be thick but that doesn't mean they don't use every tool at their disposal. I was wondering about the woman detective. She sounded terribly bitter about Holmes. Did he ask her to bring him coffee too?

I loved that scene with the lipstick. He might be observant but if he's not interested, he fails to draw the necessary conclusions. And sometimes, with Watson's remark that they are both unattached, he draws the wrong one. It showed quite nicely that he is more invested in Watson even though he must have known that woman much longer.

Edited by supposebly, Jul 27, 2010 @ 12:08 PM.

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#46

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 1:12 PM

Well, this was fun. The actors have good chemistry, there's a lot of deadpan humor and dry wit, and I got to have some iocane powder/Princess Bride flashbacks (which made me giggle a bit through the 'chess match', but that's fine). The city of London makes a fine third character and Sherlock's as sharp as I expected - well, except for *neither* of them realizing that it was the cabbie. I expected him to put it together when they were at the stakeout, to be honest. On the upside, I got to shout "THE CABBIE" at my TV screen several times, so that was a plus. I have mixed feelings about the Moffat-led DW, but I think he's actually perfect for leading this, which will hopefully turn into a series.

That said, it was about 2/3 through the episode - when Sherlock & Watson were racing down London fire escapes - that I watched SH leaping from a rooftop, black coat flowing behind him like a cape, and suddenly thought, "Oh, of course, he's Batman" (vigilante, human, singular because of his dedication/intelligence, watches over a city, lives for the chase). Second thought? The Doctor is Superman. Hee.

Edited by Whiteotter, Jul 27, 2010 @ 1:15 PM.

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#47

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 1:35 PM

even if it seemed contrived that there was only one possible route.


To be fair, Sherlock later admits that it was a long shot, chasing the cabbie that way, and that he initiated that chase so that Watson would run after him (and thus revealing that his limp is indeed psychosomatic).

I don't know if they did this intentionally or not, but I was amused that they ended up making Watson's limp psychosomatic. I think Conan Doyle was known to be inconsistent with exactly where Watson was injured (shoulder, leg, both, which is it?), so this angle complemented that perspective so well.

I agree that the cabbie plot was possibly the weakest part of this very strong story, but I'm totally willing to let that go; I think some concessions had to be made to the plot in order to create a parallel to and throw in all the references from the classics, and well, I just loved everything else about the show so much to begrudge the episode for this slip.

Watson, to me, has never been a well-adjusted everyday man. He's a veteran of a war, injured severely and hospitalized for months. And there's the fact that he'd willingly associate with a figure like Sherlock Holmes basically speaks for itself.
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#48

Thrace1

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 2:06 PM

I loved it! Definitely kept the spirit of the classic. The characters were solid. Daily Mail has an article on BBC brass considering extending the miniseries. So there is hope!
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#49

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 2:53 PM

I don't remember him actually ever killing anyone but he was the guy who would bring his revolver. I find it funny that one would see Watson as well-adjusted in the books. He is miserable when we meet him, he has an actual injury, he can't afford a decent place on his own because he has a gambling problem and no job. There are hints that he's quite the ladies' man, too. Maybe, compared to Holmes, even someone like him looks well-adjusted.


Well, I admit it's been over 10 years since I read the stories, and I didn't read all of them. Seems I have missed the earliest ones, since the picture of classic Watson I have in my head is like this: psychologically stable as a rock; does well with people; always talks about making his rounds and patients he's seeing to; owns a gun from his army time and knows how to use it (but I didn't get the impression that this was as unusual as it would be nowadays); ladies' man (I don't see what's bad about that); shares a flat - but that was hardly unusual for middle class bachelors in that time, so it didn't raise any red flags with me; at some point he got married and moved out, and then back in somehow (I don't remember... His wife died?). I guess I also tend to forget that not every country has general conscription like mine. But I don't remember an injury that's seriously hampering him, psychological issues with the war, or gambling habits, or any serious money problems, for that matter. The two of them seemed comfortable for the time. Which one is the story that mentions all that?

Edited by VioletVisions, Jul 27, 2010 @ 3:01 PM.

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#50

happybumblebee1

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 5:14 PM

It showed quite nicely that he is more invested in Watson even though he must have known that woman much longer.

Oh, yes. I felt that Sherlock liked him from the beginning. Watson offering his phone and being polite although in a quite, to-the-side way.

With all the serial killers in modern times on tv doing horrible things to their victims physically, it was cool (in the tv sense, I wouldn't ever want someone to be killed) that we had one who resorted to poison instead.

So very true. I didn't think about it while watching but yes, I'm so glad we weren't treated to gore and unnecessary violence that so often permeates mystery shows nowadays. I appreciated that.

I also quite liked how they made nods to the original stories -- the use of "RACHE" borrowed from the original Study in Scarlet (although there it did indeed mean "revenge" in German, and Lestrade thought it was "Rachel"), and the observations of Watson's smartphone that were lifted from deductions about his watch in Sign of Four. All in all it was a really smart modern retelling that respected the source material while not being afraid to give it appropriate contemporary twists.

Thank you, Tulse. While I've seen lots of adaptations (Brett is my favorite) I've only read a few of Doyle's stories and that was a long time ago. That is simply awesome how they worked in those aspects from the source but updated them in a natural way!

Benedict Cumberbatch is excellent as Holmes but Martin Freeman deserves credit as well.

Oh, absolutely. I think being a capable Watson is actually harder than being Sherlock but Freeman was so good at every turn: being naturally confused at moments but doing so in a "Um, of course you're going to have to explain your reasoning here" kind of way so he never comes across as bumbling.

I love the adrenaline-junkie Watson, it makes sense. I always wondered why Watson is so fascinated by Holmes in the beginning, especially because he initially thinks Holmes is a show-off. Being bored out of his mind after coming back from the war makes sense. Boring, Holmes is not.

I thought this, too. How to make the two seem naturally paired to each other. Well, they got it perfect here.

And they're supposed to be thick, Sherlock bloody Holmes is there to do the thinking!

Hee!
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#51

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 6:02 PM

But I don't remember an injury that's seriously hampering him, psychological issues with the war, or gambling habits, or any serious money problems, for that matter. The two of them seemed comfortable for the time. Which one is the story that mentions all that?

I don't remember which story it was in, but I distinctly remember Watson mentioning that Holmes would lock some of his money in a desk to keep him from going to the race tracks, I think.

He makes the rounds only after he's moved out, got married and had his own medical practice. He can leave at a moment's notice because, I think "Andersen" takes over when Watson is off with Holmes. Eventually his wife dies and he moves back in. There are some inconsistencies as far as I remember when it comes to another wife but generally, I think Homes remarks that Watson is better at noticing female beauty. I think in the story about the governess in the Copperbeaches.

He comes back from the war, not only injured but fairly weak from having been sick for months before he got discharged. "There I stayed for some time at a private hotel in the Strand, leading a comfortless, meaningless existence, and spending such money as I had, considerably more freely than I ought."

The whole injury thing is rather inconsistent. In the first story A Study in Scarlet, it was in the shoulder. In The Sign of Four, he mentions a leg injury that keeps bothering him. My impressions were mostly based on A Study in Scarlet where he describes himself "...I get up at all ungodly hours, and I am extremely lazy. I have another set of vices when I'm well, but those are the principal ones at present."

Ok, now I want to read them all again.
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#52

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 6:24 PM

Regarding Watson's psychological issues in the book, I do remember it standing out to me that he obviously is desperately lonely since getting back in London (as evidenced by how excitedly he gloms onto Stamford) but he apparently hasn't made a single friend yet in all his time back in London. That suggests something going on with his psychological state after coming back.

Shifting gears slightly, is it me, or was Sherlock really gay in this? I don't even mean the Ho Yay (although there was plenty of that)--I mean, if I knew nothing of the character, I would totally assume that the writers were writing him as a gay man. The defiant/amused way he says "I know it's all right." The way he turns down Watson with "sorry, married to my work," not with any variation on "I don't swing that way (or at all), thanks." The fact that everyone who knows him sees him with a strange man in tow and automatically assumes (and says out loud) "new boyfriend," which only kind of makes sense if he's openly gay. It was just interesting. Like, I expected nods to the gay vibe, but only in a winking, in-jokey sort of way. Whether intentionally or not, this seemed to go deeper than that. I'll be interested to see what they do with that in the next few episodes.

Edited by PitofDespair, Jul 27, 2010 @ 6:24 PM.

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#53

Tulse

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 8:18 PM

Shifting gears slightly, is it me, or was Sherlock really gay in this?


Perhaps, although in the original stories Holmes is nearly sexless, and I can't imagine the show writers tampering with that. (The exception in the stories, of course, is Irene Adler, so given all the contemporary updating we'll have to see if the writers use her, and if so if she's changed to "Irving".)
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#54

ganesh

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Posted Jul 27, 2010 @ 11:53 PM

Seems I have missed the earliest ones, since the picture of classic Watson I have in my head is like this:...

I've read 90% of the Holmes stories, and there is a fair amount where he's stable, especially when he's married. He has his own practice, but the other guy is always filling in for him because he's running off with Holmes. And I think Holmes and Mrs. Watson actually hit it off quite well.

Other than that, I'd say he was adrift at best. I always got the impression he was really worried when Holmes asked him to bring his service revolver. Whether it was that he was worried he had to use it, or because of what it reminded him of.

I'm certainly liking this version of Watson.

I really liked when Holmes went off describing who the shooter was and got to the conclusion about 10 seconds ahead of Lestrade, and totally shut up before Lestrade could catch on. Shock! I've got a blanket!
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#55

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Posted Jul 28, 2010 @ 12:00 AM

Oh, absolutely. I think being a capable Watson is actually harder than being Sherlock but Freeman was so good at every turn: being naturally confused at moments but doing so in a "Um, of course you're going to have to explain your reasoning here" kind of way so he never comes across as bumbling.


Freeman was absolutely fantastic, I thought. SH is the titular character, but getting the right person to play Watson basically makes or break the show. Of course, playing Sherlock Holmes, one of the most iconic characters in literature, cannot possibly be easy, but playing neurotic/functioning sociopath gives you a lot of meat to play with, while playing Watson right next to such a character requires a lot of sublety. And I agree about the bumbling factor. A lot of previous Watsons did end up looking rather bumbling and silly next to Holmes, but here, Freeman's Watson is just rock-solid and capable and intelligent, even with his own trauma.

I loved how he obviously has confidence in his intelligence and abilities, enough to have no qualms about expressing how impressed he is with someone who is, to most other people (at least obviously to the cops), threateningly and frighteningly smart. Straight-up, no BS, calls it as he sees it. It was a nice touch that Sherlock was taken aback a little by this, and obviously he enjoys those little compliments that Watson was bestowing him. So nicely played.
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#56

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Posted Jul 28, 2010 @ 1:46 AM

Straight-up, no BS, calls it as he sees it. It was a nice touch that Sherlock was taken aback a little by this, and obviously he enjoys those little compliments that Watson was bestowing him. So nicely played.


Exactly I love that bit when he first tells Sherlock that's amazing and Sherlock is like 'Really? Most people tell me to piss off when I do that.'
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#57

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Posted Jul 28, 2010 @ 2:10 AM

Did anyone else develop a gigantic crush on Benedict Cumberbatch after watching this? Because I have to tell you, I totally understand why that poor girl was attracted to him. Even with all of the non-stop rambling, inadvertent insults, and the self-diagnosis of being a sociopath, there was something oddly hot about him.

And this is coming from someone who was under the impression that Benedict only played wimps. I guess the joke's on me, eh? His acting really is that good.

I feel like everyone's covered all of my main points, so I'll settle for saying that I loved Mrs. Hudson admonishing Sherlock for being happy about the fourth death. His swooping hug and kiss, and her "Look at you! So happy. It's obscene!" combined with that little swat just told me so much about their relationship in the span of ten seconds. That's damned good writing and acting right there.

I also liked Mycroft's befuddled "Yes, of course" when Watson commented that Mycroft was genuinely concerned about Sherlock. You would almost see Mycroft realizing that Watson had been swept into Sherlock's larger-than-life world, and could possibly make Sherlock worse.
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#58

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Posted Jul 28, 2010 @ 3:21 AM

That was absolutely fantastic. I expected it to be pretty decent, but this was so much better than expected. Loved how competent and solid Watson was, even in the middle of all the craziness, and I was half giggling and half impressed by all the antics by Sherlock. And the throwbacks to the classics - just such great updates. Loved it.

Just three episodes? Noooooo! Any chance there may be another series afterwards?


A SECOND series of hit BBC drama Sherlock is afoot - but fans will have to wait more than a YEAR to see it.

Bosses have been blown away by the popularity of the show, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as detective Sherlock Holmes.

It bagged a cool 7.5million viewers on Sunday night - but executives have only ordered three episodes of the drama.

BBC drama chief Ben Stephenson said he was keen to make more but is in a pickle - as the show's writer Steven Moffat is tied up making his other show, Doctor Who.

Mr Stephenson said: "We'd like to do more. But if we do, they won't air for at least a year.Drama takes at least a year to get made and Steven is also really busy with Doctor Who."



Read more: http://www.thesun.co...l#ixzz0uxkRldEC

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#59

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Posted Jul 28, 2010 @ 6:17 AM

Liked the chase scene through London, and how he remembered every stop sign - even if it seemed contrived that there was only one possible route.


Have you ever driven, or been driven, in London? Especially in those medieval side-street warrens, there often IS only one route. Made perfect sense to me.

A SECOND series of hit BBC drama Sherlock is afoot


Oh, hurray! And of course we have to wait a year - Moffat's a damn busy man.

Though hopefully Mark, Beryl and Sue can get a lot out of the way on their own, beforehand.
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#60

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Posted Jul 28, 2010 @ 6:33 AM

New fan/U.S. viewer. Is The Sun a reliable source? (I honestly don't know.)

Would love it if more got made. Husband and I both loved part one.
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