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It's a Little Thing, But It Bugs: A Thread for Nitpickers


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#1351

purejosie

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Posted Feb 25, 2014 @ 9:58 PM

Every show should have a grammar snob to preview the scripts. And unless bad grammar is used deliberately for a character, it drives me crazy.

 

A Columbia grad saying, "There's nothing between Marty and I."  The "and I" goof happens a lot. Ugggh!


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#1352

Bastet Esq

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Posted Feb 25, 2014 @ 11:39 PM

What drives me 'round the bend is when one character properly says "... and me," and another character "corrects" them with "... and I" in a way that leads the audience to believe the second character is right.


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#1353

ethalfrida

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Posted Mar 10, 2014 @ 10:34 PM

 Purejosie, the errors when using "I" drives me crazy! Even professionals mis-use it.


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#1354

topanga

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Posted Mar 13, 2014 @ 7:29 PM

This is kinda gross, but I hate it when a character is supposed to be vomiting, and all you hear is coughing. I never hear people coughing in real life when they're up-chucking. In that situation, your throat is already burning from the stomach acids. Adding a cough would set your throat on fire, I'd think.


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#1355

Friscosgirl

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Posted Mar 14, 2014 @ 12:15 PM

Watching Scandal last night got me thinking about one (of my many) linguistic peeves. Whenever Fitz is introduced in a formal setting, they say President Fitzgerald Thomas Grant, III. It is so overwrought and unnecessary, not to mention a lack of precedent in recent memory. Most presidents used a middle initial, if a middle name was referenced at all, and none used (excepting maybe inaugurations) a suffix. How many times did the press ever cover an address by President Gerald Ford, Jr.?

I also cringe when a character is referred to as Dr. John Doe, MD. It's either John Doe, MD or Dr. John Doe.

Speaking of the abovementioned improper use of "I," I have vitriolic hatred for people who make I possessive with an apostrophe-s. Tia and Tamera Mowry are good for this. "My sister and I's relationship..." No. JUST NO!
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#1356

backformore

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Posted Mar 15, 2014 @ 12:28 AM

"My sister and I's relationship..." No. JUST NO!

 

Yes - more than any other phrase, that is one that makes me see red.  And I've heard it more and more over the years - but only on reality shows - The Bachelor, and Amazing Race.  I hate that it's becoming more and more common usage now.    

 


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#1357

OSM Mom

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Posted Mar 15, 2014 @ 2:52 PM

I hate it that if you complain about it, you're a "grammar nazi" instead of the person doing it being an uneducated moron.
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#1358

Cobalt Stargazer

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Posted Mar 22, 2014 @ 3:55 AM

It is annoying, and the worst thing is is that it *sounds* more like proper grammar than "me and my sister's relationship", so people get fooled into using it.


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#1359

Shalamar

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Posted Mar 25, 2014 @ 12:08 PM

Somewhat off-topic:  I used to work with someone who made fun of people who say "Bob and I went to the movies."  She scoffed "Who talks like that?  Everyone says 'Me and Bob went to the movies.'"  Not everyone, dear.

 

Back to topic:  when so-called experts aren't good at their jobs.  I'm looking at you, Lizzie on The Blacklist.  Your own husband was literally sneaking behind you, less than six inches away, and you didn't know he was there?


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#1360

SnarkySheep

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Posted Apr 2, 2014 @ 10:33 AM

 

 

Back to topic:  when so-called experts aren't good at their jobs.  I'm looking at you, Lizzie on The Blacklist.  Your own husband was literally sneaking behind you, less than six inches away, and you didn't know he was there?

 

The target of an investigation helpfully leaves their living room window curtainless, so that the investigator gets a good clear look at absolutely everything they're doing inside.

 

That said, the people inside never seem to notice that there's someone in a strange car right outside their window, with a huge camera, snapping away. 


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#1361

Alexandria Bay

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Posted Apr 2, 2014 @ 2:06 PM

And the neighbors never call the cops or the spied upon person because a stranger with a huge camera has been parked on the street for hours.


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#1362

OSM Mom

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Posted Apr 2, 2014 @ 6:46 PM

 

The target of an investigation helpfully leaves their living room window curtainless, so that the investigator gets a good clear look at absolutely everything they're doing inside.

 

Don't you know?  People can't stand drapes on windows.  See House Hunters for examples. 


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#1363

taiko

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Posted Apr 3, 2014 @ 12:18 AM

scripts that don't account for brand new technology, like cellphones. On CSI, there was the line about a murdered cop's family not knowing he wouldn't come home when after a major shooting at police headquarters every one would call home to say I'm okay
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#1364

SnarkySheep

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Posted Apr 3, 2014 @ 12:13 PM

Speaking of cell phones...there was a recent storyline on The Good Wife where Alicia and her new firm learned the NSA was spying on their calls, so they started using burners.

 

Yet when a tragedy occurred the other week and Diane (her former boss, with whom she hadn't been on good terms and would presumably not have had any reason to give her new number(s) to) was able to reach Alicia instantly.


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#1365

Scorpiosrule

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Posted Apr 8, 2014 @ 11:21 AM


Speaking of cell phones...there was a recent storyline on The Good Wife where Alicia and her new firm learned the NSA was spying on their calls, so they started using burners.

 

Yet when a tragedy occurred the other week and Diane (her former boss, with whom she hadn't been on good terms and would presumably not have had any reason to give her new number(s) to) was able to reach Alicia instantly.

 

Yes, but they were still involved in the same cases (which was and continues to be stupid, as if LG and Florrick Agos are the ONLY firms in Chicago), on opposite sides, so they would need to know how to contact each other-email, phone, etc.


Edited by Scorpiosrule, Apr 8, 2014 @ 11:21 AM.

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#1366

Figaro1

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Posted Apr 8, 2014 @ 2:22 PM

Twice in the last week I heard "revenge" used as a verb.  "Revenge me..."  and "I promise I will revenge my brother..." 

 

 I promise I am not that big of a fussbudget for grammar, but this is the one that nudged me to post.

 

I am also annoyed by misuse of "bring" and "take," but I attribute that to being multilingual and in other languages it's a bigger deal than in English, so I notice, where otherwise, I probably wouldn't.


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#1367

ethalfrida

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Posted Apr 8, 2014 @ 4:17 PM

One of the cast on House of Food said that last night...

 

 

 

 

 

"My sister and I's relationship..." No. JUST NO!


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#1368

SnarkySheep

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Posted Apr 9, 2014 @ 12:53 PM

I hate when people lie down on their beds with their outdoor shoes still on! Yeah, I know that some people might not care, but on the whole I think most people wouldn't want their muddy boots, grubby sneakers, etc. on top of their clean bedding...


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#1369

Friscosgirl

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Posted Apr 9, 2014 @ 1:32 PM

I am also annoyed by misuse of "bring" and "take," but I attribute that to being multilingual and in other languages it's a bigger deal than in English, so I notice, where otherwise, I probably wouldn't.

 

This is a serious irritant for me, too. English is my first language and it still drives me up a wall. BRING AND TAKE ARE NOT THE SAME THING! It could be a regional affectation; I notice it more in Southern speakers, though not limited to them.


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#1370

meepster

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Posted Apr 9, 2014 @ 1:36 PM

 

Twice in the last week I heard "revenge" used as a verb. "Revenge me..." and "I promise I will revenge my brother..."

According to my dictionary, there are 2 definitions of "Revenge" as a verb used with an object, and 1 as it used as a verb without an object.  It's legit.


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#1371

braggtastic

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Posted Apr 11, 2014 @ 12:02 PM

Isn't avenge a better word choice though?


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#1372

cpcathy

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Posted Apr 11, 2014 @ 4:57 PM

I also think "avenge" is correct.


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#1373

Figaro1

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Posted Apr 11, 2014 @ 6:08 PM

Avenge vs. revenge as a verb:  gave me the opportunity to indulge some word geekiness.  I've enjoyed looking it up and turns out that it is technically OK to say "I revenged..." but apparently it hasn't been used that way for quite some time, and in modern language, usage experts seem to agree that "avenge" is better.  So, apparently there is a technicality that makes it not exactly wrong, but I don't think it's quite right either.  Unless of course it fits the period which the examples I was thinking of did not.


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#1374

Ashforth

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Posted Apr 11, 2014 @ 9:04 PM

Snarkysheep, that Good Wife episode was practically ruined by the writers' choice to pretend that modern communication doesn't exist. None of the lawyers at the firm had gotten a phone call, text, tweet, about the fatal shooting at the courthouse. Reporters weren't calling.

The Governor of the state, at a luncheon of jouralists, was not informed by his staff and the journalists themselves were blissfully ignorant of the crisis. Again, not a phone call, tweet, text, glance at a news feed. It was ridiculous and took away from the emotion of the situation.
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#1375

espie

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Posted Apr 16, 2014 @ 11:53 AM

"My sister and I's relationship..." No. JUST NO!

I heard almost the same thing on another show recently, where someone said "my husband and my's anniversary".  Gah!!


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