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It's a Little Thing, But It Bugs: A Thread for Nitpickers


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#31

espie

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Posted Apr 23, 2010 @ 1:35 PM

I'm also annoyed by the old standby "I'll have a beer".

Reminding me of an old nit-pick that I don't think is the case any longer: back in the early 1980's I worked as a ward secretary in the local city hospital, and I was also a soap opera fan. I wish I had a buck for every time I heard a soap doctor yell "Start an IV!" and the nurse would hurry and plug some bottle of something into the patient's arm. You need to specify what kind of IV... dextrose, glucose, saline, etc. I transcribed written orders onto patient Kardexes and I knew this. No doctor ever just wrote or said "IV".
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#32

Malibu65

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Posted Apr 23, 2010 @ 2:11 PM

Why is the door always unlocked?

This bugged me so much when I would watch, "Good Times." This was a family who lived in the projects. There would be countless times the family talked about how dangerous it was living there, the crimes, etc. yet, they never locked their door. And there was no deadbolt or slide lock either. Only one episode showed the door with several slide locks on it only because they were emphasizing a particular storyline. After that episode, the locks were gone.
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#33

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Posted Apr 23, 2010 @ 2:36 PM

I played cello for 8 years, and it always annoyed me when a TV show had a character playing a string instrument with the music clearly not matching the movements of the bow.
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#34

The Mad Maple

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Posted Apr 24, 2010 @ 4:59 AM

I noticed while watching "That 70's Show" one of the characters said, "that friggin rocks." I take issue with the word "friggin'" because I never ever heard it being used when I was growing up in the 70's.

Oddly enough, I remember not only hearing it, but using it, in the mid-70s. What I remember most, was my mother explaining that it was not, in fact, less offensive than "fucking."

I was born in 1972, and my older brothers used it all the friggin' time when I was a kid. Until I hit my teens, I thought it was just a cleaner way of saying "fuck".
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#35

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Posted Apr 24, 2010 @ 1:49 PM

I played cello for 8 years, and it always annoyed me when a TV show had a character playing a string instrument with the music clearly not matching the movements of the bow.

As a fellow string player (violin) I hear you. It always bugs me when the bow is moving at one constant rate back and forth and yet the person who is supposedly playing is playing something like an Irish reel. I'm like "...no."
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#36

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Posted Apr 24, 2010 @ 3:47 PM

I was never a courtroom-lawyer but I lived through law school and four years of BigLaw life and I get quite tired of attorneys: a) being at trial ALL the time; b) only worrying about one case at a time; and 3) interjecting their own thoughts and basically tesitfying while a witness is on the stand...QUESTIONS people!!!

I was never a courtroom-lawyer but I lived through law school and four years of BigLaw life and I get quite tired of attorneys: a) being at trial ALL the time; b) only worrying about one case at a time; and 3) interjecting their own thoughts and basically tesitfying while a witness is on the stand...QUESTIONS people!!!
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#37

Bastet Esq

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Posted Apr 24, 2010 @ 4:10 PM

3) interjecting their own thoughts and basically tesitfying while a witness is on the stand...QUESTIONS people!!!


I remember an episode of The Practice in which one of the lawyers actually objected, "Counsel is testifying." I remember it because TV lawyers testify rather than question all the time, so it was quite the shock to see it called out. Of course, I'm sure in the next week's episode the lawyer who made the objection delivered her own monologue in front of the witness stand.

I'm also annoyed by the old standby "I'll have a beer".


I am too, and don't understand why shows don't simply make up a name; with the proliferation of microbreweries, it would be believable to see almost any bar on TV serving up its own brew.
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#38

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Posted Apr 24, 2010 @ 9:24 PM

Whenever, I see a show that has video footage from a security cam (like from a gas station) or an otherwise blurry photo and then uses software (usually looking VERY much like Photoshop) to clean it up. Photoshop can do wonders but it is NOT magic.
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#39

Malibu65

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 12:53 AM

Growing up in the 70's and watching one police show after another, it kills me now to watch those shows on DVD or reruns and see how sloppy the police were in protecting a crime scene, if they did at all. Another thing that annoys me about those particular shows was how the cop or detective had no problem sticking their pinky into a bag of cocaine and then tasting the residue from their pinky, just to verify it is cocaine.

Edited by Malibu65, Apr 25, 2010 @ 12:54 AM.

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#40

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 10:57 AM

Growing up in the 70's and watching one police show after another, it kills me now to watch those shows on DVD or reruns and see how sloppy the police were in protecting a crime scene, if they did at all.


It's not like modern crime shows are all that realistic, though. I doubt most murders get a crack team of scientists spending days or weeks figuring out the most minute details of what happened. The funniest to me is "Bones" where Brennen is always ordering entire crime scenes including full sized vehicles and all the surrounding dirt / muck packaged up and shipped to her offices. Riiiiiight. At BEST I can imagine her and the 3-4 people who work with her coming to the crime scene to take a few samples.

I was born in 1972, and my older brothers used it all the friggin' time when I was a kid. Until I hit my teens, I thought it was just a cleaner way of saying "fuck".


Isn't it though? I bet 95% of people who use the term mean it that way and 95% of the people who hear the term interpret it that way. So to me that is what is basically means now.
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#41

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 12:52 PM

I love this thread--nitpicking--I love it. Two of the things that bug me:
  • although most shows are written in L.A., many take place in NY. We have highways, not freeways, in NY.
  • in the 1960s, on an episode of Bewitched (which was supposed to take place in NY, someone had to show a NY driver's license and it had their picture on it--at that time, NY driver's licenses did not have photos.
Thanks for letting me vent--it's been years that those things have bothered me.
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#42

janie jones

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 2:21 PM

Maybe it's just because I've lived here all my life, but the thing that frustrates the Hell out of me is that TV seems convinced that it rains in Seattle 365 days a year when in fact that's not true.

I'm from Portland, and I'm perfectly happy letting people think it rains in Portland 365 days a year, if it keeps people from California away. :)
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#43

artdogs505

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 2:29 PM

You don't see this as much on TV today as in the 70s and 80s - but it's still around often enough to comment on: Characters who drive right up to the front of an office building, in a busy city, and park right there.

Give me a break.

Edited by artdogs505, Apr 25, 2010 @ 2:30 PM.

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#44

GeoBQn

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 3:14 PM

Sometimes on Picket Fences there were mountains in the background--a problem, since the show took place in Wisconsin.

Also, this Midwesterner gets mad when a show is supposed to take place in the winter in a geographic location that actually gets seasons, yet when people talk you never see their breath. The worst weather offender was That 70's Show which, again, was supposed to take place in Wisconsin, yet they were having outdoor BBQs on Veterans Day. It's just glaringly obvious and annoying to me because in the years the show took place (1976-1979), the winters in the Midwest were so unusually awful and snowy that scientists were speculating that the next Ice Age was on the way. But no, Donna and Eric are outside in thin jackets, with no snow to be seen.

Edited by GeoBQn, Apr 25, 2010 @ 3:19 PM.

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#45

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 5:17 PM

I noticed while watching "That 70's Show" one of the characters said, "that friggin rocks." I take issue with the word "friggin'" because I never ever heard it being used when I was growing up in the 70's.

Their speech was definitely not authentic 70's. For instance, their use of the word "so" (as in "I am so breaking up with you") is a much more recent phenomenon.
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#46

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 5:53 PM

Their speech was definitely not authentic 70's. For instance, their use of the word "so" (as in "I am so breaking up with you") is a much more recent phenomenon.


Definitely. I'm not a child of the 70s, but using "so" in that way seems far more 80s or 90s.

sticking their pinky into a bag of cocaine and then tasting the residue from their pinky, just to verify it is cocaine.


I believe that's done because if it is cocaine it will numb your tongue. Not that real police officers actually do this.
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#47

Malibu65

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Posted Apr 25, 2010 @ 10:42 PM

I believe that's done because if it is cocaine it will numb your tongue

It's ludicrous. I remember during my law enforcement college classes, one of my professors discussed this very thing.

The reality is that it's dangerous. The cutting agents are usually harmless, but you don't want to be the one who got the coke that was cut with poison.

Not that real police officers actually do this.

That was my reason for mentioning this was the norm for the 70's police/detective shows.

Their speech was definitely not authentic 70's. For instance, their use of the word "so" (as in "I am so breaking up with you") is a much more recent phenomenon.

I blame Paris Hilton and the Kardashians for that phenomenon.
It definitely was not something said back in the 70's.
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#48

espie

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 7:10 AM

As a fellow string player (violin) I hear you.

Me too. And the fingering... gah, that's often worse than the bow action. I can't tell you how many times I've seen actors just holding the violin in place with their left hand but not even touching the strings at all. Um, fellas... that's how you get most of the notes, just like on a guitar. No fingers, you only have the four open strings: G, D, A and E. Try playing "Moonlight Sonata" with those. Same with accordions... many actors don't seem to realize you have to work the bellows to get any sound to come out. If you can't walk and chew gum at the same time, don't try faking a string instrument or an accordion!
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#49

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 12:45 PM

Another one that gets me, espie, is that their hand often won't move from that one solitary spot even if they're playing something relatively complicated like Csardas that would definitely require them to shift out of first position. Yes, I know the actors can't hear the music and it takes years of hard work to be able to be able to play really complicated music, but at least TRY to make it realistic!

Another thing I would like to nitpick on, college wise, is the housing. All the dorms are clustered together and all the rooms in them are weirdly spacious. No building has better or worse rooms or heating or dining. My first month at college I was in a triple dorm room which was basically a double-sized room with bunk beds. I've never seen someone in TVland have to deal with that. If there are three people in their room they always have these gigantic suites that I've only ever seen as student apartments, not dorms. And they never mention that any of the dorms are more convenient to class, have better food, or are newer. Come to think of it, I would like to go to TV college.
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#50

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 12:49 PM

You don't see this as much on TV today as in the 70s and 80s - but it's still around often enough to comment on: Characters who drive right up to the front of an office building, in a busy city, and park right there.


Heh. We were just talking about this! A colleague walked into a reception we were all at and said, "You guys! I totally just got movie parking!" And we stared at him blankly until he said, "I drove right up to the building, parked and came in. There was a spot right out front!" It was the highlight of his week.

Their speech was definitely not authentic 70's. For instance, their use of the word "so" (as in "I am so breaking up with you") is a much more recent phenomenon.


I always thought this was popularized by Friends. It was pretty commonplace in those scripts and got a lot more popular after Friends hit.
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#51

RavensGirl

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 2:52 PM

The modern-day slang on "That 70s Show" bugs me as well. But what bugs me worse about That 70s speech is the total lack of Midwestern and/or Wisconsin accents. (And yes the weather was historically horrendous in The 70s with not only record snowstorms and the coming "Ice Age" but also some the worst tornadoes and tornado outbreaks in history, most concentrated in the Midwest.)

The same accent and weather issues bother me with many other shows and movies, particularly ones that are set in Texas. I can always tell a real vs. fake Texas accent on the first line. Not all Texans speak with an overly dramatic Southern accent and there are different dialects in different regions. And I was always driven crazy by the fact that TV Texans and Midwesterners never have storm shelters on their property.
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#52

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 3:31 PM

Another thing I would like to nitpick on, college wise, is the housing. All the dorms are clustered together and all the rooms in them are weirdly spacious. No building has better or worse rooms or heating or dining. My first month at college I was in a triple dorm room which was basically a double-sized room with bunk beds. I've never seen someone in TVland have to deal with that. If there are three people in their room they always have these gigantic suites that I've only ever seen as student apartments, not dorms. And they never mention that any of the dorms are more convenient to class, have better food, or are newer. Come to think of it, I would like to go to TV college.

In college flashbacks on How I Met Your Mother, Ted and Marshall have a pretty small dorm room with bunk beds.
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#53

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 5:27 PM

Their speech was definitely not authentic 70's. For instance, their use of the word "so" (as in "I am so breaking up with you") is a much more recent phenomenon.


Also their use of "hot" to describe a female. For example "Hot Donna" at the radio station. A.) Donna is SO not hot (which is beside the point but also bugs me) and B.) in the 70's, if she were hot, she would have been "a fox" or "foxy."

One nitpick that I notice all the time is that in family dramas or sitcoms the mother will have a full course breakfast set up for her family only to have all of them run out the door with a quick "no time to eat" with maybe one person picking up a piece of toast. What a waste of time and food. And the mom never gets mad.
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#54

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 8:04 PM

I hate that TV houses only ever have one bathroom, even if the house is huge(which it always is) and makes zero architectural sense. It's only done for lame jokes about how no one can ever get in there. We get shots of them all lined up trying to get in to shower/get ready in the morning. And any time you have to go there's ALWAYS someone else there.
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#55

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 9:11 PM

Here's another one. On average, how many people actually answer their phones by barking their last names into the receiver? I'd like to know if that's really standard procedure for cops even when answering their own personal cell phones.
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#56

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 9:41 PM

People also hang up the phone without saying goodbye a lot. 7th Heaven was the biggest offender, and they acknowledged it when son-in-law Kevin said, "Why does nobody in this family say goodbye before hanging up? Even I've started doing it and my friends are getting upset with me!"
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#57

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Posted Apr 26, 2010 @ 10:13 PM

Aside from Jack Bauer no cop or federal agent announces himself simply as "police or federal agent". They have to brand their show by giving their agency name. As in a freeze or die situation you are supposed to respond to "N.C.I.S." or "Las Vegas Crime Lab" as if anyone who was not a JAG lawyer would have any ideal what you are yelling at them.
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#58

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Posted Apr 27, 2010 @ 8:52 AM

Here's another one. On average, how many people actually answer their phones by barking their last names into the receiver? I'd like to know if that's really standard procedure for cops even when answering their own personal cell phones.

I was taught that. As a child I was required to answer the phone "Major Ter Brugghe's quarters, this is Fabrisse." My parents answered the phone "Major Ter Brugghe" and "Mrs. Ter Brugghe" respectively. I answer work and personal phones with "This is Fabrisse." It always seemed so disrespectful to me that people would just answer the phone "Hello" without identifying themselves. I was nearly an adult before I realized the military requirements were that different from the outside culture's.
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#59

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Posted Apr 27, 2010 @ 9:35 AM

On average, how many people actually answer their phones by barking their last names into the receiver? I'd like to know if that's really standard procedure for cops even when answering their own personal cell phones.

I don't know that I bark my last name (I prefer to think my tone is sultry). But in our family the landline is answered with "Hello, Dustylil residence" and I use my full name when answering my cell phone.
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#60

Malibu65

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Posted Apr 27, 2010 @ 9:39 AM

Here's another one. On average, how many people actually answer their phones by barking their last names into the receiver? I'd like to know if that's really standard procedure for cops even when answering their own personal cell phones.

For safety reasons, I have never identified myself on the phone/cell phone, even if someone calls and says, "Who is this?" I always respond with, "May I ask who is calling?" Obviously if the person knows me and I know them, the caller I.D. will confirm this. All my business calls have a special tone/ring. A simple "hello" will suffice. As for television, I have heard the occasional, "Bradford residence" or "Hello this is Tina speaking" and I have always found that pretty weird, especially back in the days prior to caller I.D.

I am still waiting to see on any television show dialogue such as, *phone rings...person reads caller I.D.* "Oh it's Mary returning my call."

Edited by Malibu65, Apr 27, 2010 @ 9:46 AM.

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