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It's a Little Thing, But It Bugs: A Thread for Nitpickers


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#1

jessicajason

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Posted Apr 18, 2010 @ 6:56 PM

Sometimes you'll be watching a show when suddenly you notice a detail, insignificant to the plot, that just doesn't sit right. Maybe the show is set in an area known for a certain accent that no one seems to use, or you notice anachronisms in shows set in the past (the 70s hair on Little House on the Prairie, for example). Here a place to share those little nitpicks.

Mine is from The Big Bang Theory; it bugs me that Leonard's glasses don't have lenses in them. I realize Leonard needs glasses but Johhny Galecki, the actor playing him, doesn't, but could they not have put clear plastic in them for a touch of realism? It's a little thing, but it bugs.
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#2

Susanlea

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Posted Apr 18, 2010 @ 8:20 PM

but could they not have put clear plastic in them for a touch of realism? It's a little thing, but it bugs.



Actually, this came up in discussions on another series where a character was wearing glasses. It's a matter of lighting, the lenses reflect the lights and can produce quite a glare; the director said it could be very difficult to shoot around.
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#3

taiko

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Posted Apr 18, 2010 @ 9:12 PM

Since I carry mail I notice that most scenes which take place in a US Post Office has the window clerks in letter carrier uniforms.
It may not be as bad as low budget shows having military or police uniforms and insignia wrong but it bugs me.
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#4

Eris

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Posted Apr 18, 2010 @ 9:54 PM

It doesn't happen often, but it drives me nuts when it does: there was an episode of The West Wing where someone referred to Zaire. This was almost a decade after the country changed it's name. I'm pretty sure that's not the only show that's done something similar either. If a show about the White House can get that wrong, what else are they getting wrong?
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#5

PartlyCloudy

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Posted Apr 18, 2010 @ 10:46 PM

The first time I ever watched CSI: Miami everyone referred to their boats as ships. Nobody calls their personal watercraft....even a yacht.....a ship! This bothers me much more than all those mountains I keep seeing in the background.

Another CSI: Miami (and Dexter) nitpick; you do not spend any amount of leisure time in the midday Florida sun while wearing layers.
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#6

dustylil

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Posted Apr 18, 2010 @ 11:23 PM

If a show about the White House can get that wrong, what else are they getting wrong?

Closer to home for the White House staff - in Isaac and Ishmael, Leo McGarry and a senior Secret Service official were under the impression that the Canadian province of Ontario shares a border with Vermont. Quebec, yes. Ontario, not so much.

As the particular discussion concerned terrorist routes and state security as opposed to the best sources of maple syrup, it was more than a little disconcerting.

Edited by dustylil, Apr 18, 2010 @ 11:24 PM.

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#7

MissMikey

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Posted Apr 19, 2010 @ 11:42 AM

These two have always driven me nuts.

People who work for the National Security Agency refer to it as either "NSA" or "the Agency." Nobody who works there calls it "the NSA." At least no one I ever knew and I grew up in a neighborhood where 75% of the adults living there worked for NSA (including my dad).

Most people who are from the East coast, particularly the DC metro area, do not refer to interstates as "the 95." They would say either "I-95" or simply "95." The X-Files, particularly New England raised Mulder, drove me absolutely batty with this one!
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#8

emjay1116

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Posted Apr 19, 2010 @ 12:48 PM

Pretty much at least once every episode I watch of House, or most other medical shows (although when I used to watch it Grey's Anatomny wasn't bad about it), they say something like "*insert disease here* can cause that/could have been contracted by this/etc.", which causes me to yell at my tv "No, goddamnit, it doesn't!" Seriously, writers, it's called Webmd, at least get a basic grasp of what you're talking about, please.

Yes, all the crazy unncessary tests Dr. House does that insurance surely wouldn't pay for, his fellows doing all the lab work for the tests ... all that kind of stuff doesn't bug me. But little medical inaccuracies drive me insane. I am truly crazy I guess.
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#9

Split Ends

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Posted Apr 19, 2010 @ 1:16 PM

A little post on behalf of my better half: no more backwards x-rays.
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#10

Bastet Esq

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Posted Apr 19, 2010 @ 1:41 PM

Most people who are from the East coast, particularly the DC metro area, do not refer to interstates as "the 95." They would say either "I-95" or simply "95." The X-Files, particularly New England raised Mulder, drove me absolutely batty with this one!


That always drives me crazy too, even though I'm from Los Angeles, where one prefaces a highway number with "the." I get that most shows are written in Los Angeles, but many of the writers are originally from other parts of the country and even the native Californians must have done some traveling (which is how I know it's phrased differently back east). So it always bugs me when characters in a show set on the east coast don't just say, "95."
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#11

callie lee 29

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Posted Apr 19, 2010 @ 9:54 PM

Another CSI: Miami (and Dexter) nitpick; you do not spend any amount of leisure time in the midday Florida sun while wearing layers.


OMG! Thank You!! Yes, so very much. It doesn't even get that cool here in the evenings, especially in the summer. Hell, sometimes it feels like it's too damn hot to wear skin, much less multiple layers of clothes.
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#12

Haleth

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Posted Apr 20, 2010 @ 7:49 AM

Nitpicks? Weather people during news broadcasts who think the word "temperature" has three syllables. Don't they teach students how to pronounce it in weather school?
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#13

espie

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Posted Apr 20, 2010 @ 11:55 AM

Most people who are from the East coast, particularly the DC metro area, do not refer to interstates as "the 95."

If I may presume to speak for the New England crowd following the same route north and right straight into Maine, we don't call it "the 95" either, so there's some more proof for your pudding. Us Maine-ahs call it simply "95". (If you get a real old-timer they might call it "the turnpike", though.)

I'm on a Hogan's Heroes kick at the moment and I notice that all the prisoners save one have clothing in perfect order... no rips, tears, pulls, etc. The one exception is Corporal LeBeau, who seems to always have at least one significant tear in the sleeve of his sweater (but the tear is in different places at different times, another nitpick). I assume this is a bit of realism suggested by the actor since he spent some time in a concentration camp and can be relied on to know that prisoners in general don't have nice new clothes. However, with the tailoring expertise on-hand that it takes to outfit all those escapees with German clothing week after week, why can't someone take five minutes to sew up LeBeau's sweater?
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#14

Archery

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Posted Apr 20, 2010 @ 12:41 PM

Weather people during news broadcasts who think the word "temperature" has three syllables.

It . . . doesn't? Temprature. TEM-pra-ture. Do people really say "tem-per-a-ture"?
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#15

selkie

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Posted Apr 20, 2010 @ 2:12 PM

Another CSI: Miami (and Dexter) nitpick; you do not spend any amount of leisure time in the midday Florida sun while wearing layers.


Oddly, I can buy that if a character splits their days between office and outside. This is the state of overly agressive air conditioning. People, just because God had John Gorrie invent the structural cooling system doesn't mean you've got to perpetually set the thermostat for 62F.
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#16

cacophony

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Posted Apr 20, 2010 @ 2:50 PM

It . . . doesn't? Temprature. TEM-pra-ture. Do people really say "tem-per-a-ture"?


Hee! That one threw me too. But then I also come from that part of Canada where "theatre" is a two-syllable word.
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#17

Haleth

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Posted Apr 21, 2010 @ 10:59 AM

It . . . doesn't? Temprature. TEM-pra-ture. Do people really say "tem-per-a-ture"?

Tem-pra-ture I could deal with (3.5 syllables <G>), it's the ones (most of them) who say "tempacher" that make me crazy. It's lazy. Ditto "vetinarian."

Edited by Haleth, Apr 21, 2010 @ 11:09 AM.

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#18

legaleagle44

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Posted Apr 21, 2010 @ 12:41 PM

I'll see all of you and raise you "liberry", "artic," "minature," "Febuary," and "perogative." I pronounce them as they are actually spelled: "library," "arctic," "miniature," "February," and "prerogative." I always have, and I always will (and yes, to me, "temperature" is a four-syllable word!)

And don't get me started on the television dolts who don't know the difference between "I" and "me" or between "she" and "her," "he" and "him," or "they" and "them." Even a fifth-grader will tell you that the first pronouns in each pair ("I," "she," "he," and "they") are SUBJECT pronouns, and are NEVER used following a preposition (or in a prepositional phrase) or as the object of a verb, while the second pronouns ("me," "her," "him," and "them") are OBJECT pronouns, and are therefore ONLY used after a preposition (or in a prepositional phrase) or as the object of a verb. SUBJECTS cannot be OBJECTS, and OBJECTS cannot be SUBJECTS, period.

Edited by legaleagle44, Apr 21, 2010 @ 12:43 PM.

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#19

espie

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Posted Apr 21, 2010 @ 3:19 PM

I think legaleagle44 is prolly right.

On I Dream of Jeannie, they had a bad habit of showing stock footage of a Gemini (2-astronaut) space capsule and then having three astronauts inside (which would have been the Apollo capsule). Gawd, that drove this kid-of-a-space-geek nuts.
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#20

AimingforYoko

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Posted Apr 21, 2010 @ 4:37 PM

I'll see all of you and raise you "liberry", "artic," "minature," "Febuary," and "perogative." I pronounce them as they are actually spelled: "library," "arctic," "miniature," "February," and "prerogative." I always have, and I always will (and yes, to me, "temperature" is a four-syllable word!)

You forgot the most mispronounced word in the english language: Nuclear. New-clear, not new-cue-ler. Mispronounced by everyone from former presidents to M.I.T. grad Tim McGee on NCIS to Jack Bauer.

I think legaleagle44 is prolly right.

Gold, espie, gold.
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#21

Malibu65

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Posted Apr 22, 2010 @ 1:02 PM

Since I carry mail I notice that most scenes which take place in a US Post Office has the window clerks in letter carrier uniforms.

Here where I live the window clerks are dressed like the letter carriers. Sometimes right down to the shorts if the weather is very warm.

I noticed while watching "That 70's Show" one of the characters said, "that friggin rocks." I take issue with the word "friggin'" because I never ever heard it being used when I was growing up in the 70's.

Edited by Malibu65, Apr 22, 2010 @ 1:07 PM.

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#22

Bastet Esq

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Posted Apr 22, 2010 @ 2:51 PM

You forgot the most mispronounced word in the english language: Nuclear. New-clear, not new-cue-ler.


I had never heard (or, perhaps more accurately, never noticed) that mispronunciation until Bush added it to his list of verbal gaffes, but since then I've heard it from at least five TV characters or personalities. It bugs me every time.

Mispronunciation and incorrect grammar in general bother me, so I must stand in solidarity with legaleagle. And with Haleth, as "temprature" (or, worse yet, "tempacher") is one of my biggest of those peeves.
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#23

taiko

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Posted Apr 22, 2010 @ 2:53 PM

Here where I live the window clerks are dressed like the letter carriers. Sometimes right down to the shorts if the weather is very warm.


You sure? Letter carriers have a good public image compared top clerks so about 5 years ago the service changed the clerks uniforms from a white pinstripe shirt to a blue shirt closer in color to that of letter carriers.
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#24

Luther Heggs

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Posted Apr 22, 2010 @ 5:04 PM

You forgot the most mispronounced word in the english language: Nuclear. New-clear, not new-cue-ler. Mispronounced by everyone from former presidents to M.I.T. grad Tim McGee on NCIS to Jack Bauer.


And Tonight Show hosts who bombed in prime time...

Final nail in the Nucular Coffin: I was watching an old Nostradamus documentary on The History Channel. The narrator was a fella by the name of Orson Welles. My heart sank when I heard Mr. Welles ask if Nostradamus had predicted...yes..."nucular warfare".
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#25

Split Ends

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Posted Apr 22, 2010 @ 6:45 PM

It is simply criminal to have a conversation about "nuclear" without discussing Homer Simpson's classic correction of Lisa's proper pronunciation.
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#26

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Posted Apr 22, 2010 @ 11:24 PM

I noticed while watching "That 70's Show" one of the characters said, "that friggin rocks." I take issue with the word "friggin'" because I never ever heard it being used when I was growing up in the 70's.

Oddly enough, I remember not only hearing it, but using it, in the mid-70s. What I remember most, was my mother explaining that it was not, in fact, less offensive than "fucking."
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#27

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Posted Apr 23, 2010 @ 3:34 AM

Maybe it's just because I've lived here all my life, but the thing that frustrates the Hell out of me is that TV seems convinced that it rains in Seattle 365 days a year when in fact that's not true. And it's not that movie pouring rain except for maybe for a few minutes at a time. A lot of the time it's just a mid-level miserable rainy. And when it's sunny, sometimes it's still cold. And sometimes we go from flip-flops and shorts weather to sweatshirt weather in the same week. (Occasionally even in the same day.) And God forbid they should recognize that the Cascades really divide our state and that east of the Cascades isn't even close to as rainy as Seattle is.

Also, why does TV think that Washington to be a uniformly liberal state when in fact it's just that King County is populous enough that with a few other counties the sate reliably goes Democratic.

LegalEagle, I frequently mispronounce most of those words (except liberry. My grandmother would have slapped the Hell out of me for that.) but if it makes you feel any better I always spell them right and when talking to people who are not my peers (e.g., parents, teachers, etc) I am very careful to pronounce them properly.

Edited by BabyVegas, Apr 23, 2010 @ 3:36 AM.

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#28

amrodgers82

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Posted Apr 23, 2010 @ 7:13 AM

A lot of the time it's just a mid-level miserable rainy. And when it's sunny, sometimes it's still cold. And sometimes we go from flip-flops and shorts weather to sweatshirt weather in the same week.


I'm from Seattle, and it kills me when everyone is shown carrying an umbrella over their heads. Puh-lease! Many (and by "many" I mean "most") people who have spent any significant amount of time in this area knows better than to lug a wet and cumbersome umbrella around. Tough it out under a hooded sweater, sweatshirt, or jacket.

And when it's sunny, sometimes it's still cold. And sometimes we go from flip-flops and shorts weather to sweatshirt weather in the same week.


Reminds me of the insurance commercial: "Sandals-and-socks guy, you're one of us". Seriously if the weather gets anywhere near 60 degrees it's taken as a sign to pull on some short-shorts and bust out the bedazzled flip flops.
Unfortunately, one assumption is pretty much always true: There is a Starbucks (or two) on every corner. You know, just in case.
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#29

Malibu65

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Posted Apr 23, 2010 @ 11:39 AM

I was watching an old Nostradamus documentary on The History Channel. The narrator was a fella by the name of Orson Welles. My heart sank when I heard Mr. Welles ask if Nostradamus had predicted...yes..."nucular warfare".

I saw that documentary years ago when it first aired.

Maybe it's just because I've lived here all my life, but the thing that frustrates the Hell out of me is that TV seems convinced that it rains in Seattle 365 days a year when in fact that's not true. And it's not that movie pouring rain except for maybe for a few minutes at a time. A lot of the time it's just a mid-level miserable rainy. And when it's sunny, sometimes it's still cold.

Having visited Seattle many times, it always seems wet and cold. ; ) And this is in August. LOL

Being from So. Calif. I hate how television always seems to show us as having a beach full of hot, bikini babes and hot, muscle guys when that is not always the case. Shows such as "Baywatch" fueled that myth.

I also hate when any television show, usually a sitcom, has a character or characters enter a specific door (such as a kitchen door) simply because the main characters happen to be in that room. It is like the characters are psychic and they know to enter the back door because so and so is eating in there. Another nitpick iare characters who just enter someone's home without ever knocking. They just waltz right in.

Edited by Malibu65, Apr 23, 2010 @ 11:41 AM.

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#30

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Posted Apr 23, 2010 @ 12:05 PM

I also hate when any television show, usually a sitcom, has a character or characters enter a specific door (such as a kitchen door) simply because the main characters happen to be in that room. It is like the characters are psychic and they know to enter the back door because so and so is eating in there. Another nitpick iare characters who just enter someone's home without ever knocking. They just waltz right in.


The flip side to that nitpick? Why is the door always unlocked? Also, why does no one ever lock the door when they leave their houses or apartments? Especially considering how many of these things are set in major cities. That one makes me kind of nuts.

I'm also annoyed by the old standby "I'll have a beer". I mean I get why they do it. But as someone who sells sponsorships for a living, I've never understood why no beer company ever took advantage of a really obvious product placement opportunity there. Is there some kind of law against plugging a specific brand of beer on television? It's a golden opportunity, people!
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