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Season Two Discussion Thread


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#1

Myndela

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Posted Apr 1, 2010 @ 9:06 PM

This is for all things about the second season of "Breaking Bad." It certainly didn't have the "sophomore slump" of many shows, that's for sure. I thought that it was even better than season one! We had shootouts, break-ups, overdoses, severed heads on tortoises, eleven-year-old murderers, and the introduction to the always wonderful Saul Goodman.

#2

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Posted May 2, 2010 @ 11:12 AM

Anyone else working their way through the second season? I just finished disk two, and I'm wondering if it would be so crazy for Walt to tell Skylar what he's doing. Season 1 Skylar, no way, but Season 2 Skylar is colder, angrier, and maybe sufficiently... pragmatic? enough to be less horrified and more grateful by what Walt is doing.

#3

SlackerInc

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Posted Jun 30, 2010 @ 9:52 PM

I just today finished the second season. I was hoping to read individual episode threads, but this looked promising until I saw how deserted it was, alas.

Are the season 2 episode threads archived somewhere? In particular, I'm interested in seeing reactions to the second half of the season, and the story arc of one new (female) character in particular. I'm not sure how much I can say, given that someone else reading this may be earlier in the season; maybe that's why it's hard to get discussion going in an all-season thread?

#4

Myndela

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Posted Jun 30, 2010 @ 10:38 PM

I just today finished the second season. I was hoping to read individual episode threads, but this looked promising until I saw how deserted it was, alas.

Are the season 2 episode threads archived somewhere? In particular, I'm interested in seeing reactions to the second half of the season, and the story arc of one new (female) character in particular. I'm not sure how much I can say, given that someone else reading this may be earlier in the season; maybe that's why it's hard to get discussion going in an all-season thread?


Check out the "Hal Becomes a Meth Dealer" thread. That was the original thread for the show. This show only got its own forum here when the third season started, and we weren't permitted to start threads for individual episodes of the first and second season. So you can go back and see what we all thought in the original thread for the show. And since this is a season two thread, you can discuss anything about season two.

Personally, I hated Jane from the start. Before we knew she was an addict, before she dated Jesse, before she relapsed. I don't want to sound like my Busia, but I didn't like the looks of her. She always put me off a bit. So when she started using with Jesse, and then she got him onto heroin, it was like an "aha!" moment with me: my mistrust and distaste was justified. And while I was certainly shocked, I definitely was not disappointed when Walt let her choke to death.

Edited by Myndela, Jun 30, 2010 @ 10:39 PM.


#5

ReadIshmael

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Posted Jul 1, 2010 @ 10:00 AM

Personally, I hated Jane from the start. Before we knew she was an addict, before she dated Jesse, before she relapsed.

Aww, I liked Jane a lot from the beginning. I loved her for sympathizing with Jesse over his family situation enough to rent him the apartment (and Krysten Ritter played the moment of her making that decision brilliantly; her look spoke volumes about her own relationshipo with her dad, and foreshadowed everything we ended up seeing), and I absolutely adored the look she gave him when he was pretending to know what DBAA stood for.

#6

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Posted Jul 3, 2010 @ 12:48 AM

I didn't like Jane either, but I thought Krysten Ritter was amazing and have since started looking for her in other productions. I wouldn't have disliked the character so much if the actress hadn't been so good! And just superficially, I like her looks; she's the sort of type I find appealing to look at, apart from being beautiful. But that wouldn't matter if she couldn't act, and she can. IIRC, she's on a Showtime series now, which channel unfortunately I do not get. I would watch it just because she's in it.

Anyway, Jane struck me as very much using Jesse to get back at her father, and I hated the way she manipulated them both. I'm not immune to her vulnerability - it was sometimes very touching - or the poignance of both her and Jesse's evident artistic talent going to waste. But overall, she had too much spoiled brattitude for me to really sympathize with her. She seemed to feel entitled to her addiction, no matter how destructive it was to her and those around her, in a way that I never saw in Jesse, who always seemed (much more rationally, IMO) defensively ashamed about it.

Her recklessness in threatening Walt appalled me, but it seemed in character. Her sense of entitlement simply did not allow her to believe that this could possibly turn out badly. Barely more than a schoolgirl, she thought she was bigger than he was... when she should have been afraid of him.

#7

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Posted Jul 4, 2010 @ 2:32 AM

This was a show that never previously had any likeable female characters (at least, none that I liked)...but that's okay, it was still a quality show that kept me coming back for more. I didn't expect a female character to come along and insinuate herself in my heart; nor did I ever predict Jesse would get involved in a love affair that I found so sweet and poignant. I didn't feel this series even needed any sort of plotline like that.

But completely to my surprise, it happened, out of nowhere: I really liked Jane. I was so happy for Jesse, and cringed for him as he haltingly felt his way through his first real love relationship (the scene where he makes huevos rancheros for her, and she surreptitiously spits out the piece of shell, made my heart ache, as did the whole sequence where he wants to meet her father and is crushed by her "do you need something?"). And then the "Apology Girl" drawing melted me like nothing I can recall coming across in a film or TV show, even those that are entirely dedicated from the beginning to developing a love story.

When Jane slipped back into addiction, it was painful. But--and this is something I think a lot of people don't see--she was still essentially a good, loving person even as an addict. She made sure Jesse lay on his side to keep him safe, and they lay together spooning, to my mind the most warm, loving position a couple can inhabit with each other. To the end, she wanted to kick the drug habit and be with Jesse; and who knows--though they didn't succeed in flushing their last stash down the toilet, maybe--just maybe--they really would have refrained from buying more.

So when Walt stood there and let Jane die, it was pure agony. Rage swelled up in me. (Later, when Jesse tried in utter vain to resuscitate Jane much much too late, more bleak devastation, heartbreak.) I felt as one poster stated in the original thread: that I cannot watch this show any more. Walt was someone I always rooted for, even if he wasn't perfect. But now, to see him allow (and even cause) the death of Jane who was so near and dear to Jesse and to me as a viewer...unforgivable.

But difficult art can be great art; and the fact that I felt such despair and rage over what Walt did makes this some very moving, very courageous television. If in the third season the utter seriousness of what Walt did is not given proper respect, the show will lose me. But I'm willing to give these writers, directors, and actors the chance to continue in the logical direction this incredibly bleak, devastating turn of events has taken us--even if it necessarily means that some entertaining satirical/comedic elements of past episodes may no longer be appropriate.

I have read many pages of the original thread--thank you for pointing me in that direction. I wanted to highlight some of my personal favourite points made there about Jane:

Brakchi:

I just have not seen this level of repudiating one's humanity on television before by a show's protagonist. That scene - that death - is a moment that is will haunt not just Walt but will linger over the show from here to the end of it's run as I believe it is meant to. When we first saw her, Jane was clean and was working hard to mantain a sobriety (I believe 18 months). She had a Father who while maybe controlling as she said (or maybe just exagerated by her in the heat of the moment) deeply loved her as only a parent can love a junkie daughter and wanted her to be safe and fully recover. Then she had to become close to Jesse and vice versa. The thing is she fell in love with Jesse and saw his vulnerability and his loneliness and he fell in love with her while not seeing she was just as lonely and vulnerable. But when she saw he was using she could only control herself so long because she felt him slipping away in his haze and she wanted to be there with him. The striking image of holding hands in front of a tv screen without reception, a moment of emotional connection, gave way to two lonely, scared people enabling each other in some foolish, pathetic attempt to get closer that is so unneeded and yet easily comprehended to anyone who has had the misfortune to know and love an addict.

That was the thing. She was just a sad young woman who fell back into the trap and yet could have been saved. And here is Walt, a loving father and a person with enough love to try to save Jesse (the "nephew") after a talk at a bar, allowing his own selfishness to control him and rot his soul. To watch a young woman die like that is unsettling but to see our protagonist watch knowing that he can save her is devastation.


So this all might help explain why it's difficult for me to read comments from viewers who blithely shrug and say they are glad Jane died. I also strongly disagree with anyone who says that Jane would have taken off with Jesse's money. Would love to hear the writers weigh in on this.

Along those lines, wevrbunny made a great point about the animus against Jane:

I also think there are a lot of (misogynistic) assumptions being made about how Jane would/could destroy Jesse. The only certainty is that she's a junkie, not that she's the 'woman as destroyer' archetype--That's Walt's opinion of her, but that doesn't mean it's true. I actually respect Jane's standing up to Walt and her father, and I found her fervent desire for freedom intriguing and even touching.


And I really like this, from firestarter:

It's easy to write off people as far gone as Jane, that they're dead already, that it's a mercy to let them die now, but it's not a given that all drug addicts will someday die from it. There are numerous stories from former drug and alcohol addicts who were much farther down than Jane and who are now living happy, productive lives. They're parents, they do good in the world, and they often help others to reclaim their lives as well.

It's not up to Walt, or anyone else, to decide a 26-year-old girl isn't worth saving. No one can know what her future will be. And though Jane was obviously very reckless and self-destructive, she had enough of an instinct towards self-preservation to sleep on her side in the first place so she wouldn't choke on her own vomit. Walt's presence put Jane in mortal danger, and it was his decision to let her die.


Edited by SlackerInc, Jul 4, 2010 @ 2:25 AM.


#8

Helen 67

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Posted Jul 4, 2010 @ 11:50 PM

So when Walt stood there and let Jane die, it was pure agony. Rage swelled up in me. (Later, when Jesse tried in utter vain to resuscitate Jane much much too late, more bleak devastation, heartbreak.) I felt as one poster stated in the original thread: that I cannot watch this show any more. Walt was someone I always rooted for, even if he wasn't perfect. But now, to see him allow (and even cause) the death of Jane who was so near and dear to Jesse and to me as a viewer...unforgivable.

But difficult art can be great art; and the fact that I felt such despair and rage over what Walt did makes this some very moving, very courageous television.

One didn't have to like her to have that reaction. I felt much the same, and then slowly came to the same conclusion.

And I think we've already been seeing the repercussions of Walt's action then, ever since. Not just the plane crash, but in Walt himself. I am not at all sure he would have felt the same degree of obligation to Jesse if he hadn't done this truly terrible thing. It seemed clear to me that there was a lot of guilt as well as caring involved in his finding Jesse and literally saving him from himself afterward, and in his growing increasingly emotionally cut off in other areas. So my feeling is that, while it's of course ongoing, as Walt can never undo it, the seriousness of Jane's death and Walt's, at the very least, contributing to it, have already been addressed in great part. What remains to be seen is whether or not Walt will ever give in to the natural human urge to confess, and if so, what then.

Editing to add: I'm keeping my remarks to S2 as best I can - no spoilers for you herein, SlackerInc! Checked AMC's recaps to make sure, and I'm surprised to see that the things I'm talking about all happened in one episode, the last... it felt like a longer time span somehow. Well, it was one hell of an episode.

Edited by Helen 67, Jul 5, 2010 @ 1:25 AM.


#9

SlackerInc

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Posted Jul 5, 2010 @ 12:54 AM

I should note that I haven't seen the third season at all (not on DVD yet, alas). So maybe I'm playing with fire, engaging in a contemporary discussion with those who presumably have...?

#10

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Posted Sep 9, 2010 @ 9:14 PM

I just finished season two, and holy shit. I like to think I can predict these kinds of things, and my record is pretty good, but despite being on overdrive about the meaning of the bear in the pool the whole season I never once came close to seeing that payoff coming. Hats off to everyone involved for pulling off something perfectly logical yet utterly unpredictable.

#11

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Posted Sep 9, 2010 @ 9:47 PM

Eegah, you seem to have reacted more positively than most of the audience did when it first happened.

#12

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Posted Sep 11, 2010 @ 3:55 PM

Helen67 - I agree with your post. I really like the actress, and as well the Jane character in terms of the interest and layering it brought to the story. Great love story, great and hearbreaking to see her story and Jess'. However, I saw a manipulative con artist junkie who very quickly turned Jess' money to "our money".

In no way do I condone what Walter did - I think this program does a great job exploring the fact that we all (probably) have the capacity to sink lower and lower, and that there may be no limits one would reach to protect their family (I'm not saying most people would kill or contribute to one's death..... just very generally). And man Cranston can sure play the bad guy. (I just got done watchin Season 1 and 2 in about 2 weeks - and I love how understand he is in the Walt role... those eyes... just a flicker and he's changed...

But I also saw in Jane what a lot of families hate seeing in their junkie children - and I never thought for one minute she was good for Jess. Again, not Walt's call to determine when she should die. Frankly, I was much more concerend about Jess' long term well being, if he continued his relationship with her, than her potential to impact Walt's life. She was I would have said, unredeemable and forever to be a junkie. And she would have taken Jess down in her wake.

#13

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Posted Sep 11, 2010 @ 8:41 PM

I just finished Season 2 this morning. Aaron Paul is absolutely phenomenal. The scene in the flop house when Jesse breaks down sobbing was so gut wrenching.

I've watched the first two seasons on iTunes over the past week or two, and the biggest suprise about the show is that I am at a point where I have absolutely zero sympathy for Walt. I obviously knew the premise of the show before I started watching and I'm a fan of Bryan Cranston, so I thought that even though the character is a meth manufacturer/dealer, I would have some sympathy because of the cancer. But, I am at a point where I feel no sympathy for him about the cancer or anything else.

Not sure if that will change in Season 3 (I've already watched the first two episodes), but I can't imagine it will.

#14

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Posted Sep 14, 2010 @ 1:17 AM

I really like the actress, and as well the Jane character in terms of the interest and layering it brought to the story. Great love story, great and hearbreaking to see her story and Jess'. However, I saw a manipulative con artist junkie who very quickly turned Jess' money to "our money".

Concurred. I think she was also a genuinely interesting person, but... and it's a big freakin' "but." In retrospect, I think it was her recklessness that bothered me most, far more than her sense of entitlement. It fed into Jesse's own tendencies to be reckless, and that can't lead anywhere good.

Although no one could have predicted that it would end up the way it did. Except, of course, the phenomenal talents who write this show.

As to whether or not a viewer can ever forgive Walt for this, or ever again have any sympathy for him... well, I don't know. I guess that'll vary for everyone.

Hats off to everyone involved for pulling off something perfectly logical yet utterly unpredictable.

I know, right? It made sense once it'd happened, but until then, who would've guessed?

And, yes, Aaron Paul is incredible.

#15

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Posted Nov 13, 2010 @ 1:38 PM

Unfortunately, Dad's dropped out of the show after season one; he thinks Walt fell too far too fast, and can't get invested in him anymore. Mom kind of thinks the same thing, but loves all the other characters so much that she's sticking with it.

"Grilled" was a pretty fun experience. She was completely on the edge of her seat the whole time, and actually so was I despite knowing how it would end up. It's such an uncomfortable situation, but you can't look away. I also imagine that this was essentially where season one was supposed to end, with Tuco dead and Walt stuck far from home, having to come up with a good explanation of where he's been.

Both Mom and my brother are very impressed with the actress who plays Windy; they both say she's the most realistic looking hooker they've ever seen on TV or a movie.

#16

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Posted Nov 20, 2010 @ 12:25 AM

Mom's just seen Over, which she says is the first time she's realized just why Bryan Cranston is so well-regarded on this show and won all those Emmys; until now she's been much more impressed by Aaron Paul.

It also hit me for the first time while watching this how much Cranston looks like James Ellroy with his season two look. That's a fun little bonus.

#17

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Posted Nov 21, 2010 @ 5:41 PM

which she says is the first time she's realized just why Bryan Cranston is so well-regarded on this show and won all those Emmys

That's the first time I've ever heard anything like that from anyone who watches this show. Not that he isn't really good in "Over," like he always is, but it's amazing to me that that would win her over when nothing in the first season did.

#18

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Posted Nov 22, 2010 @ 1:42 AM

Both Mom and my brother are very impressed with the actress who plays Windy; they both say she's the most realistic looking hooker they've ever seen on TV or a movie.

She is very, very good, but I think it's the convincing meth-mouth that really makes people believe her. For that, I think I have to credit the make-up/prosthetics department. The actress is Julia Minesci, and as you can see, her own smile is undamaged.

#19

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Posted Nov 22, 2010 @ 10:03 PM

She is very, very good, but I think it's the convincing meth-mouth that really makes people believe her. For that, I think I have to credit the make-up/prosthetics department. The actress is Julia Minesci, and as you can see, her own smile is undamaged.


I imagine it's difficult for a beautiful actress to accept a part that involves being made-up ugly.

Julia is a consummate professional!

#20

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Posted Nov 24, 2010 @ 1:03 AM

I imagine it's difficult for a beautiful actress to accept a part that involves being made-up ugly.

I know, right? My hat's off to her! And it was a pretty minor part, too - but on a great, great show. I imagine she was simultaneously happy to get it, and dismayed - "I hafta look like that? Really? Couldn't we make her just a little bit pretty?" But she went with it, rather bravely IMO, career-wise, and she was perfect in the part.

#21

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Posted Nov 24, 2010 @ 5:25 PM

We've now finished season two. The most interesting part is that Mom had zero sympathy for Jane after her death, even calling her "evil." That probably comes from her father being a narcotics detective who went up against some very bad drug lords in the '60s and '70s, including Frank Lucas.

Man, the plane crash is impressive on the subwoofer.

#22

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Posted Dec 16, 2010 @ 11:14 PM

I can't believe I've waited until now to watch this incredible show. I heard all the accolades for Cranston's performances, but the premise of the show just seemed too strange and didn't appeal to me at all. Until I finally broke down and watched the first episode of Season 1 a couple of weeks ago. I have since speed-watched the first 2 seasons, and I'm hopelessly hooked now.

But it's a strange experience watching (and loving) this show. I can't say I really enjoy the episodes anymore, as they've gotten deeper and darker. As a matter of fact, the last few episodes have been hard to watch. I actually had feelings of dread as I began each episode of the last part of Season 2, a palpable feeling in my gut. Is that strange, or has anyone else felt that?

The acting is impeccable, the writing is excellent, and the story is absolutely riveting. I thought the ending of S2 was contrived, but it worked. I can't wait to start S3. Or maybe I can. Where can this story possibly go next? Wow.

#23

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Posted Dec 18, 2010 @ 1:13 AM

I actually had feelings of dread as I began each episode of the last part of Season 2, a palpable feeling in my gut. Is that strange, or has anyone else felt that?

Oh sure. But for me, I felt it really worked as an integral effect of the show. I liked it that I was moved to that degree by these increasingly reprehensible characters. This show, like no other, IMO, really makes use of its medium as an art form.

If you disliked that dreading experience, you may wish to stop where you are. If you keep going - please drop me a line, or post here, and let me and/or us know what you think of S3, would you? I'd be very interested in your apparently quite different-from-mine perspective on it!

Editing (meant to respond to this sooner, sorry for the delay!):

The most interesting part is that Mom had zero sympathy for Jane after her death, even calling her "evil."

I'm not so sure she's wrong about that. I go back and forth on Jane... genuinely misguided, or manipulative narcissist? Both? I don't know!

Edited by Helen 67, Dec 18, 2010 @ 1:18 AM.


#24

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Posted Dec 28, 2010 @ 3:24 AM

Just finished watching season two: DAMN!

I am fascinated by the different takes on the Jane storyline.

When Jane slipped back into addiction, it was painful. But--and this is something I think a lot of people don't see--she was still essentially a good, loving person even as an addict. She made sure Jesse lay on his side to keep him safe, and they lay together spooning, to my mind the most warm, loving position a couple can inhabit with each other. To the end, she wanted to kick the drug habit and be with Jesse; and who knows--though they didn't succeed in flushing their last stash down the toilet, maybe--just maybe--they really would have refrained from buying more.


I saw this scene completely differently. It was pure junkie logic, that desperation to keep using and the fantasy of getting clean tomorrow. An addict is someone who can quit using anytime -- as long as anytime is next Tuesday. They never would have kicked together, especially not when they both were so completely in the high mode and not strung out. Jesse was in the first flush of the most incredibly difficult addiction to get out of and without Walter's actions would still be in the grips of. Heroin is an even nastier bitch than meth.

As callous as it seems, what Walt did in letting Jane die is to give Jesse a real chance to live. Jane dying just might be enough to keep Jesse off the needle. I have my doubts, because he looked like he loved being high, in a way only the true opiate addict does.

Yes, Jane was a lonely, vulnerable girl who was obviously cherished by her father, and she didn't deserve to die because she played hardball with someone she completely underestimated. One doesn't expect to find Heisenberg when one looks at Walt, yet every day we see him Heisenberg is slowly gaining control of Walter White.

Anyway, Jane struck me as very much using Jesse to get back at her father, and I hated the way she manipulated them both.


This I also did not see. I saw Jane as trying desperately to be the healthy girl her father wanted and scrambling to pull herself together enough to convince him she was okay so he wouldn't worry. If anything Jesse was a lot LIKE her father, both men who cared for Jane beyond reason and wanted to be in a place of prominence in her life.

The most powerful scene of the season was the scene between Walt and Jane's father in the bar. I was spoiled in advance as to the major plot developments that would happen over the course of the season, but I didn't know about that scene. Two random strangers connected in such a profound yet unknown way. Contrasted with Gus meeting Hank and donating to Walt's fund, where one party knows that the meeting is anything but random and the other is oblivious.

#25

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Posted Jan 19, 2011 @ 2:28 PM

Hi all, I'm a new BB viewer and I'm through episode 8 of season 2. I think what strikes me the most about this season is how much I really don't like Walt anymore. In the first season, I felt bad for him and rooted for him, but now he's just mean to everyone. I liked the concept of an everyday guy who needs to make money for his family, but in season 2 Walt hardly mentions making money for his family-- he just seems greedy. What do you guys think-- is this an intentional shift in the Walt character or am I still supposed to like him?

Also, I really don't believe that Skyler ever loved Walt. I think she loved having a man that made her feel in charge of everything and that she could easily control. Then Walt started to gain independence and she couldn't handle it. I never really get that she is or ever was supportive or loving towards him.

I think what strikes me most right now is that I really don't like any of these characters. I know that sounds strange, like "then why are you still watching?" but I like the show, but dislike these people. I want to see what happens to them and I'm intrigued by the premise of the show. Don't get me wrong, I like the show and I'm not complaining, I just think it's strange that I wouldn't want to know any of these people in real life and I don't root for any of them at this point. (I would say that maybe an exception to this is Walt Jr., but I don't really see him as a fully-fleshed character. He's just kind of there. I don't dislike him, but I don't know enough about him to root for him.)

#26

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Posted Jan 20, 2011 @ 10:27 PM

My view is that the show's central tenet is that no matter how good your reasons are, if you do bad things then you will become a bad person. This is even clearer in season three, though I won't give anything away there.

And you don't like Hank, either? He was easily the favorite of my whole family at that point.

So what do you make of the one-eyed, burned teddy bear? It's pretty much the major, iconic image of the show to me, and trust me that the reveal of its meaning is NOT a disappointment. I was trying the whole season to figure it out, and I'm usually pretty good at that, but I never once came close to the real answer. Yet it also makes perfect sense, and in hindsight you really can see the whole season leading up to it bit by bit.

Edited by Eegah, Jan 20, 2011 @ 10:29 PM.


#27

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Posted Jan 20, 2011 @ 10:57 PM

What do you guys think-- is this an intentional shift in the Walt character or am I still supposed to like him?

Given everything I've ever heard Vince Gilligan say about it, I'd say it's definitely both intentional and significant...and for me, it's a big reason why the show works. I stopped liking Walt for good around 2x05, but it's only made me appreciate the show more. It's such a better story than "good guy does bad things." And not liking Walt hasn't affected my interest in him in the least; the more loathesome he is, the more compelling (intellectually, at least) he becomes for me.

But for me, my hatred of Walt is also countered by my love of the other characters, especially as of season 3, and most especially Jesse, who is the most emotionally compelling character I have ever encountered. Never have I been so emotionally invested in a character before, and that started for me around 2x04 and has just kept building.

#28

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Posted Jan 21, 2011 @ 10:38 AM

Hi all, I'm a new BB viewer and I'm through episode 8 of season 2. I think what strikes me the most about this season is how much I really don't like Walt anymore. In the first season, I felt bad for him and rooted for him, but now he's just mean to everyone.


I am at the same point as you. After all the awards Bryan Cranston was winning, I decided to check out the show; I watched the Season 1 DVD and am catching Season 2 episodes as AMC shows two a week. I felt for Walt in Season 1 but have come to hate him in Season 2; I can't stand Skylar either so I'm not bothered by the way he treats her, but I hate the continuous abuse he heaps on Jesse. It seems to me that Jesse is a good person who is trying his best to get out of the hole that he has dug for himself, but everytime he makes some progress, Walt brings him back down. Jesse cares about people, as evidenced by him helping the little boy with the addict parents, feeling bad about watching the addict wife kill her husband and treating his three dealer friends as people, while Walt just uses and abuses everyone he comes into contact with.

I don't know what happens in the rest of Season 2 or in Season 3, but I am rooting for Jesse to get over his addiction and get away from the poisonous Walt. As long as Jesse is under Walt's thumb, I just don't see any hope for him; Walt will continue to drag him down.

#29

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Posted Jan 21, 2011 @ 4:53 PM

And you don't like Hank, either? He was easily the favorite of my whole family at that point.

Oh, I had forgotten about Hank. I grew to like him a lot more after his troubles with the promotion and his panic attacks. Before then I just found him crass. So, okay, of all the characters on this show, Hank is the only one I like :)

I think Walt mellowed out a bit after his daughter's birth. I have to say that I'm happy that Skyler finally left him, though. Although given that AG is still an actress on the show, I get the sense that Walt's marriage is not exactly over. I did really want him to tell her just to see her reaction. I think if he finally does get to tell her it will take a lot to convince her.

I did not at all see the plane crash coming, and the symbolism is spot-on. Did Jane's father do it by mistake or intentionally? It seems like a mistake (although I don't understand all the pilot jargon) but I could see it being intentional. Kind of a "my life is ruined so I'll ruin other lives" thing.

I liked that we finally saw the meaning behind the pink stuffed animal. But during the beginning parts of the episode, didn't we see two body bags being zipped up? Are these people we know? Now I'm going to have to find a way to watch season 3 because the DVDs aren't out yet!

#30

leesha79

leesha79

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Posted Jan 21, 2011 @ 6:48 PM

Given everything I've ever heard Vince Gilligan say about it, I'd say it's definitely both intentional and significant...and for me, it's a big reason why the show works. I stopped liking Walt for good around 2x05, but it's only made me appreciate the show more. It's such a better story than "good guy does bad things." And not liking Walt hasn't affected my interest in him in the least; the more loathesome he is, the more compelling (intellectually, at least) he becomes for me.

But for me, my hatred of Walt is also countered by my love of the other characters, especially as of season 3, and most especially Jesse, who is the most emotionally compelling character I have ever encountered. Never have I been so emotionally invested in a character before, and that started for me around 2x04 and has just kept building.


Oh yes! All of this. I too stopped liking Walt early in the second season, but have only become more interested in what he does now, and especially the latter part of season three. Drug kingpins aren't nice fluffy people: to rise in that world in the upper echelons, you have to be absolutely ruthless.

I remember perusing the forums when I first started and being perplexed by all the Jesse love. I loved Aaron Paul's performance from the start, but I didn't really start loving Jesse until his first meeting with Tuco. And from there it has just grown and grown to the point where I'm more invested in Jesse than any character I can remember for AGES. When Jesse hurts, I hurt for him. Even when Jesse makes bad decisions (which is pretty much ALWAYS), I want things to work out for him. Something about him brings out a deep protective instinct, in Walt as well as me.

Edited by leesha79, Jan 21, 2011 @ 6:49 PM.