Jump to content

3-1: "No Mas" 2010.03.21 (recap)


  • Please log in to reply

141 replies to this topic

#31

Tim Thomason

Tim Thomason

    Video Archivist

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:20 AM

Could it be possible that the shrine scene was a flash-forward, and they are giving thanks for Walt's death? I guess that's what I was getting at with my revelation about the narcocorrido.


The clothing and the car implies, to me at least, that it occurs before their clothes-line swap & trip to Texas. So the scene doesn't seem to be a flash-forward, but more likely somewhat concurrent with Walt's activities in Albuquerque (and continuously).

I'm not familiar at all with Spanish culture and "Santa Muerte," but I wonder if that crawling scene has any real-world religious signifigance. My mind was racing (guy has his legs shot? group has their legs shot/injured? crazy drug lord orders all who come to him on all fours?) until the "reveal" of a presumably religious nature. These two cartel-mates sure are gonna be a wacky bunch. (Religion/tradition is the weapon to stop them, Walt!) With their killing of the entire truck-load of illegals, I guess they don't want anyone to know they're coming (not that the killing/truck exploding is well-hidden). Maybe they thought this "mythical Heisenberg" might've had spies on that truck, and couldn't take the chance?

I'm in the super-minority that doesn't see Walt to blame *at all* in the deaths of 166 people over Albuquerque, NM. Blaming Walt is just as valid as blaming Skyler or Jesse or Jane or cancer or whatever. There's too many degrees of seperation. Sad to say, Doug Margolis is the only legitimate person at fault, and maybe whoever okayed him working that day (and perhaps the faulty "collision radar"). A system that uses 1960s technology and can cause a tremendous mid-air collision over a major city on one person's careless mistake is seriously messed-up. Of course, the fact that Walt doesn't blame himself is proof that he in fact blames himself (obviously).

Jesse seems to have taken the "personal responsibility" thing a little too much to heart. I don't think his daughter-killing counselor (sad story) intended to have his patients accept themselves as "bad people" (just, presumably, people with faults that don't need drugs to hide them). Of course, maybe he's the secret mastermind, sending out Jesse to hook more people on meth and give him more patients. That was a high-end rehab clinic, right? It's possible that some of those people could be politician's sons/daughters, and therefore maybe a future President was in fact there.

The episode was a little slow, without much action, and just moving the storyline post-crash/seperation. I expected as much, as we've had similar eps in the past. I did expect more from a season premiere to tie-in with S1 and S2, but I can see the action coming. And we finally got the reveal from Walt to Skyler on his activities (you should've agreed on marijuana! she might've accepted that...).
  • 0

#32

Maka

Maka

    Stalker

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:20 AM

It will be interesting to see what becomes of the money after all is said and done. That is, if it gets made and if it doesn't get confiscated. And if Marie doesn't find it.

Why would Marie in particular find it? But I am super interested in finding out how Walt is going to launder his money. Just having it sitting around in a big duffel bag doesn't seem like the smartest. If I were a drug king pin - heh - I would definitely go with the "long lost uncle left me a chunk of change" idea, then set up a legit business to funnel it all through.

I'm just curious if, in the long run, people would think Walt was also partially responsible for helping Jesse?

It'll really depend on what Jesse does from now on, imo. Up until now, Jesse hasn't - with his own hands - killed someone. And he's taken the death of another human being very, very seriously. Even crazy ass Tuco and how he couldn't kill him. So if the death of Jane, and then all those people on the planes, result in Jesse completely embracing the idea that he's already a murderer? And he ends up murdering someone else with his own hands because of the business? And I mean, in cold blood. I don't think I could ever forgive Walt.

Now, having watched it a second time, I am wondering why the two bad guys had to kill the truckload of border crossers. No one knew who they were.

Actually, the talkative kid in the truck with them had figured out who they were. The silver skulls on their boots must be a trademark for the cartel they work for. So when the kid saw the boots, and then realized there were skulls on the toes, he stopped talking and looked really uncomfortable. That's when the two bald dudes knew they'd been made and they weren't going to chance the blabbermouth kid blabbermouthing to everyone he knew that cartel folks were in Texas. Course, a big truck explosion in the desert is probably going to tip boarder patrol, DEA etc that somebody major just strolled into town, but at least now no one is alive to describe what they look like. Brutal.

Edited by Maka, Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:27 AM.

  • 0

#33

Tim Thomason

Tim Thomason

    Video Archivist

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:34 AM

I love the choice that Walt has now isn't really a choice at all. It's not his family or the drug business; it's the drug business or nothing. I'm not sure how the Pollo guy is going to rope him back in, though--maybe blackmail, considering he knows Hank is his brother-in-law?


I think Gus (the Polo guy) is just gonna sit back and wait. He probably knows all about Walt and his family situation, and will wait for Walt to desperately show back up at the chicken place. And then offer him maybe only a million dollars. That smile on his face was more like a sarcastic "Sure. Whatever you say, chief."

And he ends up murdering someone else with his own hands because of the business? And I mean, in cold blood, I don't think I could ever forgive Walt.


Yes, Evil Murdering Drug Dealer < Tragic Drug Overdose. Making young Jesse Pinkman into a "bad man," which will likely lead to the deaths of others through Jesse's actions does not make Walt a hero in that regard. We like Jesse, but he really doesn't seem to be a wholesome member of society right now.

Course, a big truck explosion in the desert is probably going to tip boarder patrol, DEA etc that somebody major just strolled into town, but at least now no one is alive to describe what they look like. Brutal.


I like the symbolism between the opening scene of the religious whack-os crawling to the shrine, and the final scene of the truck driver briefly crawling for his life (was that intentional?).

As I said upthread, I like to think they don't want Heisenberg and "his gang" to be tipped off of their presence and the mass murder was to stop any word of "Two guys from the Foot-Skull Cartel are in the States" reaching out. They have a higher opinion at this point of Heisenberg than they realize. And killing a bunch of people for little-to-no reason makes them all bad-a**.

Why would Marie in particular find it? But I am super interested in finding out how Walt is going to launder his money. Just having it sitting around in a big duffel bag doesn't seem like the smartest. If I were a drug king pin - heh - I would definitely go with the "long lost uncle left me a chunk of change" idea, then set up a legit business to funnel it all through.


I assume Saul will give him some pretty good options in laundering. If I were a drug kingpin, I wouldn't hide it too much, visit Vegas for a few days, and use the illegal gambling excuse. They can't confiscate 3 million dollars won late night in the basement of a seedy bar, can they? What if you innocently try to have that amount taxed, and can't bring forward witnesses?

Edited by Tim Thomason, Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:41 AM.

  • 0

#34

SultanOfSurreal

SultanOfSurreal

    Channel Surfer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:41 AM

As I said upthread, I like to think they don't want Heisenberg and "his gang" to be tipped off of their presence and the mass murder was to stop any word of "Two guys from the Foot-Skull Cartel are in the States" reaching out.


No, I think they were there to kill that particular guy who noticed the boots. He mentioned having painted cars for cartel members before, after all. And when he realized what was on their boots, he seemed very, very disquieted. I don't think it's unreasonable to think maybe he had connections with a rival operation. And seeing as those two dapper gentlemen could probably have gotten into America any number of ways, the fact that they dressed down and rode in with a coyote seems to imply that Heisenberg wasn't their only mission for the day. They killed everyone else just out of the general principle of "leave no witnesses."

Edited by SultanOfSurreal, Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:41 AM.

  • 0

#35

vanilladutch

vanilladutch

    Channel Surfer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:49 AM

I think Gus (the Polo guy) is just gonna sit back and wait. He probably knows all about Walt and his family situation, and will wait for Walt to desperately show back up at the chicken place. And then offer him maybe only a million dollars. That smile on his face was more like a sarcastic "Sure. Whatever you say, chief."

Something has got to make Walt desperate, though--he's not after money anymore (he said himself, he has more money than he knows what to do with at this point, and now that Skylar knows where the money came from she's not going to take a cent of it). It'll be interesting to see how much of a choice Walt has whether or not to get back into the business.

I think the cartel guys only blew up the truck because they'd been made by the blabbermouth guy. His "connections" seemed more like empty boasting than anything else.
  • 0

#36

SultanOfSurreal

SultanOfSurreal

    Channel Surfer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:57 AM

I think Gus (the Polo guy) is just gonna sit back and wait. He probably knows all about Walt and his family situation, and will wait for Walt to desperately show back up at the chicken place. And then offer him maybe only a million dollars. That smile on his face was more like a sarcastic "Sure. Whatever you say, chief."


I think it's far more sinister. Those two cartel men may be working for Gus. The way I see it, Gus -- hyper-cautious as always -- is beginning to realize the folly of doing business with someone like Walt. He wants him gone gone gone before Walt ends up in prison, squealing like a pig.

Edited by SultanOfSurreal, Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:58 AM.

  • 0

#37

Tim Thomason

Tim Thomason

    Video Archivist

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 1:14 AM

I think it's far more sinister. Those two cartel men may be working for Gus. The way I see it, Gus -- hyper-cautious as always -- is beginning to realize the folly of doing business with someone like Walt. He wants him gone gone gone before Walt ends up in prison, squealing like a pig.


It seems implied (although not necessarily) that the hitmen are in league with a cartel, via the talkative guy. Would Gus be in charge of this cartel? I always thought he operated independently of them. Of course, that would lead him to the same trouble Walt is in, although his carefulness might've protected him initially. But the convolution is in why the hitmen don't have better information on Walt. They only have a sketch of him in his Heisenberg persona (sunglasses and fedora). If Gus had hired them, wouldn't he have been able to funnel them with some more information, like, say, a photograph, name, and address? We don't yet know for sure that they don't have these things, but the fact that they had a rough sketch of him implies they don't (why would Gus provide a confusing sketch as well?).

Don't get me wrong, I like the idea. Gus being the next big bad is quite the step-up from Tuco and will help alot in getting Walt to that coveted "Scarface"-spot. If he only became more decisive and less whiney (but then we'd lose our heart and story).
  • 0

#38

Vinny Vidi Vici

Vinny Vidi Vici

    Couch Potato

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 1:24 AM

Why would Marie in particular find it?


I only threw that in for the comedy value, her being the family shoplifter and all.
  • 0

#39

myriadphalanx

myriadphalanx

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 2:22 AM

Giancarlo Esposito (Gus) got bumped up to the opening credits this year, which is a pretty strong hint that his offer to Walt will be revisited later this season. Good to see Esposito in a bigger role too, he's an excellent actor.
  • 0

#40

Muffyn

Muffyn

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 2:29 AM

Absolutely loved that Walt used Better Call Saul matches when torching the money.
  • 0

#41

Fisher King

Fisher King

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 3:43 AM

The Better Call Saul matches were a nice touch indeed.

I don't see how Walt can get out of not manufacturing anymore. There are too many players now. Namely, Gus and Saul and the folks they employ. Just too much money to be made. Not to mention that Heisenberg is probably lurking just below the surface.

Welcome back, show.
  • 0

#42

Floridabound

Floridabound

    Couch Potato

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 4:46 AM

he's not after money anymore (he said himself, he has more money than he knows what to do with at this point,


Is that a lot of money in AZ? It's not in CA, or NY.

Also, why didn't he put it in a safety deposit box?
  • 0

#43

xVladx

xVladx

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 6:48 AM

Is that a lot of money in AZ? It's not in CA, or NY.


I'm sure you mean NM, not AZ.

California and New York both tend to be on the pricey side as far as living expenses go. I know that Arizona tends to run cheaper than them both, and I'm guessing New Mexico is similar. Not to mention that it's still half a million dollars, and Walt doesn't really strike me as someone with expensive tastes. He's also more focused on getting his family back now, so that probably also factors into the "more than I know what to do with" side of things. Basically, he doesn't care about earning more money now.

Regarding Gus, I find him more unnerving than the two bald possibly-cartel guys. With them, you're almost certain they're out for blood. Gus comes across as so emotionless that you don't know which way he's going to jump. We know so little about him that there's no way to know if he'll just let Walt walk away or try to punish him or drag him back in.
  • 0

#44

calliek

calliek

    Couch Potato

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 7:13 AM

Where did that sketch come from? I can't recall.
  • 0

#45

ThePsychic81

ThePsychic81

    Channel Surfer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 8:04 AM

The weasely way Walt made the distinction between "drug dealer" and drug manufacturer" made me cringe a little bit. He's so oblivious to the consequences of his actions--last season, when he went to go find Jesse in the shooting gallery, I was like, "Look around you, Walt...this is what your "product" does to people." It's not just the plane crash or Jane's death that he's at least partially responsible for, and even those events he's trying to rationalize away. (I did laugh at the speech in the gymnasium. How awkward was that?)

I love the choice that Walt has now isn't really a choice at all. It's not his family or the drug business; it's the drug business or nothing. I'm not sure how the Pollo guy is going to rope him back in, though--maybe blackmail, considering he knows Hank is his brother-in-law?


The people who are using "his product" are going to use anyway. Where there is demand, there is supply. You could take all of the drug dealers off the street, and within minutes, they'd be easily replaced.

Additionally, Walt's meth is of such high purity that he's ironically SAVING lives...or at least extending them.

Blaming drug dealers for the prevalence of drug use is lame. It's the users' fault and theirs alone...nobody's holding a gun to their head and making them use.

And I'll add, Jane's death was her own fault. Nobody made her relapse. Walt could have saved her but she shouldn't have needed to be saved in the first place.

Edited by ThePsychic81, Mar 22, 2010 @ 8:05 AM.

  • 0

#46

Tim Thomason

Tim Thomason

    Video Archivist

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 8:19 AM

Where did that sketch come from? I can't recall.


I'm not sure. Did the DEA make it last season? I wouldn't think so, because Hank could've noticed. Otherwise, I guess, one of Tuco's surviving cronies made the sketch or was interviewed for it at some point.

Blaming drug dealers for the prevalence of drug use is lame. It's the users' fault and theirs alone...nobody's holding a gun to their head and making them use.


I don't want to get philosophical on here or anything, but I think drug dealers and drug users (and drug manufacturers!) are all equally to blame for the drug problem in society. You take any of those three groups out of the equation and there is no drug problem (not manufactured OR not distributed OR not used). Less drug dealers = better society (assuming you believe, as I do, that society as a whole is better with less methamphetamine). The same applies equally to less drug manufacturers and less drug users. Users wouldn't use if their was no one to get them drugs (obviously), so it's all an issue of supply & demand (can't have one without the other).

Walt's creation of a million dollars worth of pure methamphetamine is not conceivably a good thing. The "blue stuff" might be *safer,* but I'm not convinced that it isn't more addictive, and it's obvious more pleasurable/gives a better high. Those two just compound the problems with drug users pulling all the stops to get this specific brand of meth, and probably some unsafe imitators using toilet cleaner dye or something.
  • 0

#47

Floridabound

Floridabound

    Couch Potato

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 8:20 AM

Not to mention that it's still half a million dollars, and Walt doesn't really strike me as someone with expensive tastes.


New Mexico, sorry.

NM or NY or CA, there are still the two kids, both needing college educations, and rearing the baby until she's off to college.

In addition to $500K not being enough, there would be no more show if he stopped cooking.

My guess is he'll find out I'm right, and get back to the RV, or wherever.
  • 0

#48

NiagaraDvr

NiagaraDvr

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 8:23 AM

I saw the massacre of the border crossers as a juxaposition of the sparing of the family. Up to that point they were just two bad ass guys in a Mercedes and had been nice enough to give a car to that family in exchange for some clothes after the tension and buildup that they would kill the little girl, young mother, and father. If they didn't show them murdering all those innocent people they would be pretty sympathetic characters, bad men on a mission to kill a bad man.

I liked the visit to the shrine. Hate the wife Skyler. He needs a gun moll like Saul said.

The long lost uncle and Vegas stories don't work. There would be a paper trail and questions even from a very trusting wife/etc. Best way to launder money is through semi legimitate charities and churches. For a small percentage that money can turn clean.
  • 0

#49

peeayebee

peeayebee

    Stalker

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 8:26 AM

I think Gus (the Polo guy) is just gonna sit back and wait.

I got a different vibe from Gus. I may be wrong, but I think he's going to blackmail Walt in some way, get at him thru his family. Maybe not.

That opening image was creepy. Like everyone else, I was wondering if the first man we see crawling had been shot. It built up very nicely. Seeing the drawing of Heisenberg on the shrine wall was chilling.

Later when we see the twins (who I''ve read are referred to as "the cousins") taking off their expensive suits and leaving their Mercedes with the poor family, I thought they were giving up all their worldly possessions for religious reasons. Another misdirection! Very cool.

I also read (at Alan Sepinwall's column) that the scene where the cousins light the truck was not CG at all, and that the actors (who are actually brothers, one an actor, the other a newbie) were only 60 feet away when the truck exploded. BC told them there could only be one shot and that they couldn't flinch. They didn't.

I love how there's a cross across the street from Walt's house, a reminder of his complicity in that disaster. Then of course finding the eyeball was another reminder. Looks like Walt will be carrying that in his pocket for a while as his own personal reminder.

The school assembly was uncomfortable and funny and horrible. The student who was suggesting that the tragedy be used to give all the students A's was hilarious. Then the one student who mentioned God was admonished by the principal to keep it secular. Geez. Of course Walt's speech was terrible as he tried to rationalize away his responsibility and the magnitude of the crash.

I didn't get the scene where Walt is spending so much time and concentrating so hard on making that sandwich and trimming the crusts just right.

I hope the show does something with Marie. Her character is such a cartoon, and I don't know if she serves much purpose other than to be a sounding board for Skyler.
  • 0

#50

TexasTallGal

TexasTallGal

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 9:08 AM

I didn't get the scene where Walt is spending so much time and concentrating so hard on making that sandwich and trimming the crusts just right.


That reminded me of the sandwiches he made for the first guy ... the one locked in the basement. Remember? He wanted the crusts cut off his sandwiches. I don't know the significance of that, however.
  • 0

#51

Xbones

Xbones

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 9:22 AM

good memory Texas about the sandwich

I think Walt will have no choice but be drawn into "cooking" again - his family will be in danger -

Great episode - kudos to Vince for his excellent writing and Byran for not only his acting but directing. Another exciting season to look forward to.
  • 0

#52

birdythurs

birdythurs

    Couch Potato

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 9:25 AM

Yeah, I thought the sandwich was a call-back to Domingo (Krazy-8) and the moment of decision. I also thought that the cigarette/matches to light the truck on fire were a throw-back to the Pilot episode when Emilio started the brush fire by the RV. I'm not sure of the symbolic significance of that, but that's what I thought of.

peeayebee, I've also seen photo captions describe the Silent Ones as "The Cousins," so my guess is they're Tuco's family. In "Grilled," Tuco's cousins were supposed to come get them and bring them to Mexico. Not sure if the authorities put Tio in any sort of facility afterwards, but he 1) knows Heisenberg's real name is Walter White and 2) knows Walter White/Heisenberg tried to kill Tuco. (Maybe DEA finished him off, but for damn sure Heisenberg wasn't an ally.) Tio didn't see Walt decked out in hat and glasses, but if the narcocorridos have enoguh info to come up with the ballads it can't be that hard to put two and two together. I thought that they might not have planned to kill the whole truck, but when the young guy commented on the boots, well, those are pretty distinctive identifying characteristics. He had to go, and the witnesses had to go. Not sure why the truck had to go up in flames though.

I spent the whole episode cussing, in a good way. "Oh Shit! That's Walt as Heisenberg!" "You bastards, how dare you release his name to the public?" But I think the biggest "Oh shit" moment was when Walt mentioned family and Gus just sat there, then "Enjoy your meal, sir." Good lord. In terms of TV terrors I have a hunch Gus could go toe-to-toe with Livia and/or Ronald Merrick, and we haven't even seen him do anything yet!

Would the airport/FAA release Donald's name to the press? Seems to me you'd hush that up, but maybe the public screaming for accountability forced their hand. That and the student meeting at the high school seemed a bit heavy-handed, but who knows. Thank God I've never had to have that sort of gathering, so maybe those are based on real comments. It makes sense that that would be how Walt justifies it to himself, but you'd think by now he'd know that it's not always good to think out loud.

Poor Jesse. This will not end well.
  • 0

#53

Constantinople

Constantinople

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 9:52 AM

What's with Anna Gunn's blonde hair, her forehead and her plumped lips? That doesn't really look like Skyler, but Anna Gunn trying to a look more stereotypical Hollywood glamorous.

Loved it when Walt said he's been studying the plane crash and knew much more about it than Jesse did (probably). Yes, Walt does know much more about it.

I'm also glad that Walt referenced the possibility of faulty Traffic Collision Avoidance System. Although if that were really the case, I'd expect more of the news reports we say to mention this. The whole point of such a system is to avoid the consequences of human error.

Some pretty funny moments in the show though. I liked when Walt was explaining where this crash ranked among all the others


I was amused when Walt rhetorically asked an assembly full of teenagers why none of them remembered a plane crash that occurred over 30 years ago.

Given that the kids are asking why this happened, I wonder if they'll assign The Bridge of San Luis Rey in English class at Walt's school.

Blaming drug dealers for the prevalence of drug use is lame. It's the users' fault and theirs alone...nobody's holding a gun to their head and making them use.

No one's holding a gun to the dealers' heads and making them deal.
  • 0

#54

jbethea

jbethea

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 10:11 AM

what was the text message on Walt's phone when he was making the sandwich? that's the only part I missed.

great episode. the emphasis on the far-reaching effects of the plane crash was a bit heavyhanded, but otherwise no complaints! poor Jesse. he needs to run far and fast. but of course he won't.
  • 0

#55

LethalCandy

LethalCandy

    Couch Potato

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 10:27 AM

jbethea, I think it simply said "Pollos."

Edited by LethalCandy, Mar 22, 2010 @ 10:28 AM.

  • 0

#56

birdythurs

birdythurs

    Couch Potato

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 10:32 AM

jbethea, I wasn't sure if it was a text message or caller ID, but it said "Pollos." Arranging the meet, probably. (ETA: Ditto LethalCandy)

Skyler did seem a little more glammed than usual, Constantinople, but I assumed she was dressing for work--and maybe Benneke.

Whether to blame dealers or users, it's the vicious cycle of economics. Supply and demand, dealers wouldn't deal if users didn't buy, and users probably wouldn't be buying if the dealers weren't so easy to get in touch with. Everybody makes the choices. That's probably a little too pat, but I think there's enough mess to go around.

Heavy-handed foreshadowing I noticed in the Pilot during the marathon on Friday night: Walt prefers to think of chemistry as the "study of change."

Edited by birdythurs, Mar 22, 2010 @ 10:33 AM.

  • 0

#57

jbethea

jbethea

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 10:40 AM

thanks! that makes sense.

I thought it was going to be a drug deal and he was going to call his son and tell him he couldn't take him to school after all. I was glad that didn't happen.
  • 0

#58

starleen

starleen

    Loyal Viewer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 11:18 AM

First of all, Yay! for giving BB its own topic.

Even Wil Wheaton loves BB. Here's his Twitter:

GodDAMN, Breaking Bad is a fantastic show. I'm officially adding it to my guest actor wishlist.

I would totally love a Wheaton appearance on BB.

I still hate Skyler.
  • 0

#59

Van Hohenheim

Van Hohenheim

    Channel Surfer

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:08 PM

I remember that the reaction to the plane crash last Season was, for the most part, quite negative. It was largely deemed sensationalistic, irrelevant, or stretching the show's credibility to attribute the whole thing to Walt's actions. Having read some of the comments here, though, I now understand exactly why they chose to include it, and what a brilliant idea it was.

It's no secret that drugs -and especially meth- are an evil, dirty business that ruin lives. However, looking at how vile and unsympathetic most of these junkies are, it's pretty easy for Walt to admonish any personal responsibility for their tragedy- afterall, they're the pathetic losers who chose to do the damned drugs in the first place. This is an opinion that seems to be held by quite a bit of the show's audience, as well, whose empathy for Walt and disdain for the meth-users allows us to distance his choice to sell meth from the countless tragedies that it results in. We've seem from the start of the show that Walt doesn't really fully comprehend or feel accountable for all of the lives his product is destroying- he considers his business an illegal activity with potentially disastrous consequences for himself and his family, but he never seems to show even the slightest bit of responsibility for pain it inflicts upon its users and their families. The plane crash, however, is forcing Walt to acknowledge the far-reaching, life-destroying impact that his work has upon others. Yes, it seems silly to us that he'd feel worse about a terrible accident that he's only partially, unintentionally respnsible for than the thousands of people he's killing daily with his product, but that's how he rationalizes his decision to sell. Walt convinced himself that the only people being affected by his job were those closest to him, but in reality, his choice to produce and sell meth makes him responsible for all of the widespread, horrific damage that meth does to people- which, for middle-class old white guy living in the burbs, is pretty easy to ignore. The crackhouse that he rescued Jesse from last Season only exists because Walt, and others like him, promote activity which occurs in there. Still, Walt is able to ignore/deny the fact that many of the horrors taking place there can probably be directly traced back to him, because he dehumanize junkies and would rather blame them for their self-destruction than hold himself accountable for the fact that many of them are only there because of him and his meth. The plane crash forced him to confront the fact that what he does kills people- yes, he may be feeling guilt-ridden over the wrong victims, but at least he's finally feeling remorseful and taking respnsibility for all the seemingly-unrelated lives he's destroying- not just the ones right in front of him.

Edited by Van Hohenheim, Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:19 PM.

  • 0

#60

peeayebee

peeayebee

    Stalker

Posted Mar 22, 2010 @ 12:09 PM

I just realized that the shot of Walt throwing the match onto the BBQ is echoed later when one of the cousins throws his cigarette down onto the gasoline-soaked ground. Both shots are from the POV of the fuel source and end with the screen filled with flame.
  • 0