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#1471

Madmarsha

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 9:43 PM

I'd never be chosen. Not interesting or varied enough. I have decided that along with doing all the other stuff that people say they'd do if they won the lottery, I would love to organize, orchestrate, pay for, subsidize, etc etc a family reunion for my husband's family. He has 17 first cousins WHO HE HAS NEVER MET. Problem is I'd like it to be while his aunt is still alive ..... and she's 98 so the lottery gods have got to get cracking. And then I'm going to Belgium to see what cousins we can scrounge up there.

I wouldn't say this epi was LITERALLY (tm Rob Lowe on Parks and Recreation) the most interesting but I loved that he asked things like "How do you know that?" indicating he was truly invested in the process and not just willing to sit there like a log and be spoon fed info without questioning at least a little bit how the info is gathered. Boy, were those Lowe boys cute. I think Chad was even cuter than Rob as a little boy!
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#1472

Bubbacat

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 9:45 PM

I thought Rob Lowe's episode tonight was very interesting. I live in Pennsylvania north of Philly, and there are lots of stories of Hessians who were captured, held prisoner in this area, but stayed on after the war was over. There's even an area very close to my house called Hessian Hill. There was a prisoner of war camp for Hessians there. This area is very Pennsylvania German (also known as Pennsylvania Dutch). There are families of German descent still living here who can trace their history back to the 1600s. You'll see the names of families that still live here in documents dating back that far. But there are other Pennsylvania German families who can "only" trace their name and their family history in this area back to about 1780. Those are the descendants of Hessians who found a lot of open land and people who spoke almost the same language that they did. (Pennsylvania German is a bit different. It's a mixture of German, Swedish, and English.) So because their opportunities were limited back in Germany, they stayed here. It was really fascinating to hear Rob Lowe's family history mesh so well with the histories of families here. In fact, I know some (Pennsylvania German) families in the area whose last name is East. I wonder if it's the same family.

Edited by Bubbacat, Apr 27, 2012 @ 9:51 PM.

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#1473

harrie

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 9:49 PM

I'm descended from Tories, too; but mine ran for Canada versus being sent there.

The hubby and I were alternately laughing at Lowe's trying to will his ancestor to be a "patriot" and frustrated at how they drew out the big reveal. When all the soldiers who served with Lowe's 5G-grandfather in that book had German names, I was like "they're Hessians, dude" and I'm a mere dabbler in things historic. But it seemed like it took forever for them to actually break it to him. Plus, the playing up of the heroism of the 5G-grandfather in staying in America - when he essentially had nothing to go to home to in Germany, so why not stay here and give it a go? I like Rob Lowe well enough, but I was a little ... not disappointed, but not terribly enthusiastic about this ep.
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#1474

kimmako

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 9:50 PM

The tax his ancestor paid was specially levied to support the war. That is how he got in the SAR.
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#1475

jjj

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 10:39 PM

I enjoyed this episode (Rob Lowe is indeed so cute!), but I don't understand why the documents of the German/Hessian captives were written in English. Even when they brought out the printed broadside IN GERMAN, Rob said, "Oh, that's so they could understand it." Also, it was very odd that all the documents had SUCH wide spacing between the lines -- I have dealt with a lot of letters (originals) from this period, and everyone wrote in tightly spaced lines, because paper was a limited resource. All this makes me think they recreated documents in English for the episode.

Edited by jjj, Apr 27, 2012 @ 10:41 PM.

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#1476

HalfDutch

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Posted Apr 27, 2012 @ 11:18 PM

I don't understand why the documents of the German/Hessian captives were written in English.


The historian in Trenton said that the Hessian soldier's diary was a reproduction, so it had likely been translated as well. It showed some wear and tear so I wonder when that was done. Probably not 1777!

While I greatly enjoyed this episode (it ranks as one of my favorites), I do wonder how much the producers know in advance of where the story is going to go. There's clearly some prep before the celeb gets to peruse the documents in question. I do wonder if it's as "needle in a haystack" as it's represented or if it's all mapped out ahead of time. That said, I thoroughly enjoyed this episode. I did think it was evident immediately that his ancestor was a Hessian, unless the twist was going to be that Christopher East had been taken prisoner by the Hessians and it was a list of prisoners. (Not sure how much of that went on.) They never did establish with East did to become a celebrated citizen by 1906, unless it was that he was considered a patriot. I would have loved to see what he did with his life after settling in America.

And goodness, Rob is still so very easy on the eyes. He's aged so well and he came off as very intelligent and engaged in the process. There wasn't the usual reveal to the family but it ended on a very satisfactory note. It's definitely a very interesting chunk of American (and German) history and it is revolutionary to think that, in essence, enemy soldiers were invited to stay, no questions asked. That's amazing. I wouldn't be surprised if Rob were to produce a TV movie or something about that period in history.

ETA: I see that Rob's current project is a miniseries in which he stars as Ulysses S. Grant, due next year.

Edited by HalfDutch, Apr 28, 2012 @ 12:31 AM.

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#1477

SuzN

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 12:15 AM

I really enjoyed the episode with Rob Lowe and not only found it interesting but it produced a bonanza for me. I didn't realize that the DAR records could be accessed online - their site is overwhelmed right now with others with the same idea, so it is very slooooow, in spite of that, I've found records for six direct ancestors so far. I haven't purchased any applications yet, which can be downloaded in pdf format - I want to give the site time to cool down and do more searches first.

I did find Rob Lowe's 5g grandfather's story interesting but as always, it's too obvious that the work has already been done. I realize that we don't want to watch the sometimes tedious work that goes into research, but they need to come clean about all that's done before the celebrity arrives and is handed an ancient book, conveniently bookmarked. I do wonder how much the celebrities are told ahead of time - are they genuinely surprised?
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#1478

WileyCoyote

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 5:01 AM

Dear Mr. Lowe,

Your Ancestor paid a compulsory tax, after he was freed as a Prisoner of War from the other side, and you are a famous actor and will get us good press, ergo he is a confirmated Patriot, and you are eligible to be a Son of the American Revolution. Please donate to us!

Edited by WileyCoyote, Apr 28, 2012 @ 5:04 AM.

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#1479

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 8:49 AM

Dear Mr. Lowe,

Your Ancestor paid a compulsory tax, after he was freed as a Prisoner of War from the other side, and you are a famous actor and will get us good press, ergo he is a confirmated Patriot, and you are eligible to be a Son of the American Revolution. Please donate to us!


This sums up my feeling about this also. When this episode ended, my husband and I just looked at each other wondering how it was suddenly decided that Rob could become a Son of the Revolution with his 5-G's background. I don't believe that a regular American (without a TV show being filmed about his relatives) would have gotten the same treatment.


I did find Rob Lowe's 5g grandfather's story interesting but as always, it's too obvious that the work has already been done. I realize that we don't want to watch the sometimes tedious work that goes into research, but they need to come clean about all that's done before the celebrity arrives and is handed an ancient book, conveniently bookmarked. I do wonder how much the celebrities are told ahead of time - are they genuinely surprised?


I have read several times that the actual work of digging into the history of these people is always totally done before hand. I don't remember specifics, but it has been stated that there are some folks who wished to be on the program but their backgrounds did not turn up anything interesting enough to film for a show. I also have read (it might have been about Finding Your Roots on PBS) that a couple of celebrities have bowed out after reading some of the things that were found out about their ancestors.

I also wonder how much they are told in advance and if they are really surprised by what they are reading. Since most of these people are actors, it is not beyond them to act like they are surprised even if they already know the facts....
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#1480

GeoBQn

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 9:50 AM

Favorite obvious question of the night: "So, were large families like this normal back then?"

Rob, do you think birth control was accessible and reliable in the 1750's? The closest thing my family in Europe had to birth control was my great-grandfather being in America for years at a time and conceiving my grandfather and his three brothers on return trips.
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#1481

jjj

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 10:58 AM

Plus, unfortunately, infant/child mortality used to be much higher, so people tended to have large families and know that some of the children likely would not live to adulthood.

Thanks, HalfDutch, for telling me that the Hessian "diary" was a reproduction. It looked so oddly out of style with period documents (too polished, and that wide spacing you hardly ever see), aside from the fact that it was in English.

I agree that it is pretty clear that teams do the background research to determine which celebrities have the most intriguing backgrounds, and those are the episodes that get aired.

I too was a bit cynical about the letter from the Sons of the American Revolution ("contribute here!").
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#1482

Madmarsha

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 11:52 AM

The historian in Trenton said that the Hessian soldier's diary was a reproduction, so it had likely been translated as well. It showed some wear and tear so I wonder when that was done. Probably not 1777!

Oh, I wondered why they allowed him to manhandle that book.

but they need to come clean about all that's done before the celebrity arrives and is handed an ancient book, conveniently bookmarked

I try not to but I do admit to having asked questions of others who I know have been doing research in an area I'm interested in, Where do I find X document -- because I figure if you've been doing genealogy in X town, you should know, right? -- and being perturbed when the answer is a version of, How the heck should I know? I mean, I think if YOU don't know and you're more familiar with a particular county's resources than I am, how am I going to stumble upon it? It's not like I'm asking for the book that has my family tree already done up in it for me. Those do exist for everybody, right? {snerk}


It is maddening when you watch the celebrity reading line by line for one name on one piece of paper and upon finding it are like, EUREKA! Um, dude, the only reason it's there is because they already know it's there after reading through who knows how many names with who knows how many spelling variations on how many lines on how many documents taking who knows how many hours long after your eyes have crossed.

Hey, I am woefully ignorant on some areas of history. Esp. wars. I rely heavily on my husband to help me with that. So I give a pass to Rob Lowe on how unsure he felt about his scope of knowledge; but, yeah, the question about the size of the family was kinda duh. And I don't really have a lot of families in my tree with a ton of kids but I do have some with 10-12 kids. If only he had to deal with the families that reused names on more than one child after having a stillbirth or when girls were named after their mothers and you don't even have the sometime advantage like you have with the son of a Jr. or III suffix.

Edited by Madmarsha, Apr 28, 2012 @ 12:21 PM.

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#1483

SuzN

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 2:51 PM

I have read several times that the actual work of digging into the history of these people is always totally done before hand.


I knew that the research was all done ahead and that not all the celebrities researched do an episode - what I want is transparency about that. If they weren't busy pretending that the celebrity was actually doing their research, they might be able to offer more helpful information for those of us doing our own.
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#1484

edmonds

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 4:00 PM

I have read several times that the actual work of digging into the history of these people is always totally done before hand.

I knew that the research was all done ahead and that not all the celebrities researched do an episode - what I want is transparency about that. If they weren't busy pretending that the celebrity was actually doing their research, they might be able to offer more helpful information for those of us doing our own.



The part that is most annoying to me is when they go to the Library of Congress or DAR, etc. and the head of the department is there to welcome them and the places are totally empty of any other people. It just makes them seem so 'special'. If we regular folks went there, we would be searching around (if we were even allowed permission to be in certain areas) for days looking for the information these celebrities are given immediately.

Also they seem to want viewers to believe that after Rob Lowe hit a dead end at his first stop in Germany that he needed to ask where he should go for more information. Hey Rob, I think that has already been taken care of for you. I am sure the producers have already even rented the car for you to drive to the next destination.

There are interesting parts to this program. But a little transparency or message before the show starts indicating that professional researchers actually do the work would be nice. And yes as someone else mentioned, giving the celebs a piece of paper and them pretending to "try" to find their relatives listed on it is so lame. Obviously they would not be handed the paper by the researchers if the name they were looking for was not there. One of the guest celebs (I really can't remember which one) had a real problem trying to read the old handwriting and kept asking the researcher to 'translate' if for them.
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#1485

Author By Night

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 6:19 PM

I didn't finish Rob Lowe's, but I plan to. I mostly know him from Parks and Recreation, so after he shows up in the beginning credits I read the other names with Chris Traeger's voice in my head. "Paula - Deen!"

Rob, do you think birth control was accessible and reliable in the 1750's?


Honestly, I'm beginning to think some of the questions are being asked for the audience. Sort of like how Stephen King will appear on a talk show and the host will ask a question like, "so you wrote The Shining, right?" Most of viewers know that, even if they've never read a Stephen King novel themselves in their lives. But there's some who might not, so the host asks as a way to inform those particular viewers, not because (s)he invited Stephen King to be on his or her show and didn't even bother to look him up on google. I don't know if that's actually how it works though, it's just a theory. As for me, I'm always surprised so many children survived on my own tree. But even in my grandparents' generation it wasn't uncommon; they lost some siblings. I always want to point things like that out to people who wish they'd been born in the 1900s. No, I don't think you really do wish that.

Edited by Author By Night, Apr 28, 2012 @ 6:30 PM.

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#1486

HalfDutch

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 7:20 PM

I wonder how much of the celeb's family tree they research before zeroing in on the one to feature for the episode. I suppose they might stop once they hit paydirt but it might take a long while to find one worthy ancestor. And as someone pointed out, above, some celebs apparently are dismissed as they don't have anyone interesting in their family tree.

Does anyone else here watch "History Detectives?" They're much more limited in having just one object to research but of course they only feature objects that end up having a fascinating story to share. Again, I wonder how much prep goes into the background before they run with something.

There's obviously some scripting with the celebs as well but Rob's reactions did seem genuine, at least with the letter at the end. And they often do eps with non-actors, like football players, who also seem genuinely surprised and moved by the turn of events. I'd like to think that even if they do all the legwork ahead of the time, the celeb is somewhat in the dark.

"Finding Your Roots" seems less fan-farey as the stars don't actually go on any "journeys" from what I've seen, but simply sit at a table and are told the story and shown documents without doing any of the inquiries themselves. I suppose that's more honest but then you don't have the scenes of the star going back to sites where their ancestors actually (probably) lived.

Edited by HalfDutch, Apr 28, 2012 @ 7:21 PM.

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#1487

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 7:32 PM

I call bullshit on Rob being invited to join the SAR. Maybe John Christopher East DID pay taxes that supported the Revolution, but Johann Christof Oest fought and possibly killed Americans in our War for Independence. AND ... in Rob's own words, Herr Oest "tried to stick it to George Washington".

I could be totally mistaken, but I think his suddenly becoming a "patriot" was extremely convenient for both Rob AND the SAR.

Edited: Just Because

Edited by slasherboy, Apr 28, 2012 @ 8:26 PM.

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#1488

GeoBQn

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 7:55 PM

I took a few left turns in you tube and stumbled across this video. Almost as if they heard us all talking. They are accepting contest entires until June 1, for a chance to have them produce a video about your family tree. It doesn't say if it will be on the network or what.

Here's the Facebook page for the contest. Star of Your Family Story Contest

Video entries will be judged on creativity of the video, breadth of family tree, and diversity of family background. Make sure you share your entry with your friends and family as well!

I'm worried about the diversity criteria--I don't think they'd consider "hodgepodge of Eastern European countries" to be diverse. On the other hand, my husband has been looking for an excuse to fiddle with the movie creator on my laptop.
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#1489

Happycatisfine

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 9:26 PM

Thanks GeoBQn for that link, I am sending it to my nieces and nephews (23 in all), some of whom have actually worked to construct a family tree.

Regarding the WWII generation not sharing their past, I found the opposite to be true with my parents and their friends. My father’s experiences as an 18-19 year old in the European and African theaters of war were told to us often around the kitchen table (mind you, he had 6 girls before my brother was born); I so wish we had the technology to record those stories. Fascinating, tragic, scary, horrible and occasionally humorous. And he was also perilously close to being one of the original “silk stocking bandits”. I am so glad he shared his experiences with his children.

And both my parents loved to tell stories about their neighborhoods and their friends from when they were growing up. That my mother’s grandparents didn’t like my grandfather because he was “shanty Irish” and my grandmother was “lace curtain” Irish and he moved his new wife to an outpost of civilization – which was really about 5 miles from the city center (Cleveland) but was pretty much farmland then. He bought a house and 5 generations of that original (Mc)Nally/Kelly union lived, partied, fought, learned, loved and died in that house.

What bugs me is my father’s history: we knew his mother, aunt, and grandmother – they would often visit to play cards at our house at the dining room table – but we know very little about his father, for some reason my dad didn’t speak of him.

My mother’s father owned the first tire store in Cleveland with his partner Johnny Kilbane, the Featherweight Championship boxer. But they blew ALL their money on booze, loaning money to deadbeats and, Johnny anyway, women. Oh well.

We were told about the Great Potato Famine in Ireland and were taught that the English were not our friends. I think that’s why my mother’s family came to America, but I don’t know how my grandfather ended up here. We were told one of our relatives (a great-uncle I believe) was shot and killed on the steps of City Hall in County Mayo during the protests.

I hope one of the nieces/nephews is up to the task. I would love to have the resources of WDYTYA.

Edited by Happycatisfine, Apr 28, 2012 @ 9:31 PM.

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#1490

WileyCoyote

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 10:21 PM

I call bullshit on Rob being invited to join the SAR. Maybe John Christopher East DID pay taxes that supported the Revolution, but Johann Christof Oest fought and possibly killed Americans in our War for Independence. AND ... in Rob's own words, Herr Oest "tried to stick it to George Washington".

I could be totally mistaken, but I think his suddenly becoming a "patriot" was extremely convenient for both Rob AND the SAR.

Of course, it was bullshit of the highest order (as were Rob's on-cue barely restrained tears of joy and pride over it).
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#1491

ChicagoCita

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Posted Apr 28, 2012 @ 10:39 PM

I liked the Rob Lowe episode a lot. He's an actor and never knew much about his family, so I don't really mind that he's not asking genealogy-savvy questions or is being led through the history by others who have researched it.

The first ancestor I ever found was a distant cousin listed in a cemetery book. I burst into tears! Did it matter that someone else had researched the cemetery 30 years before and typed all the information listed on the tombstones into a book, and I found it? Nope, it was the first discovery, the first link, I had to my ancestors beyond my grandparents' generation and it was thrilling and exciting. I will never forget the "aha moment" of finding it, and one of the reasons I enjoy this show is that we get to see people finding that first link and making those discoveries.

As far as the DAR and SAR, I have a generally good opinion of them letting people in whose genealogies can be proven. My uncle (by marriage) has a large farm on property that was given to his ancestor by General Washington as a reward for fighting in the Revolutionary War. That ancestor is buried on the private cemetery on the property (which has been, remarkably, preserved and handed down generation to generation). I have seen people come from all over the country to get to the cemetery and take a photo and get a rubbing of his gravestone, because he's the final link in their quest to become members of the SAR and DAR. It's tremendously moving when it happens, and these are just regular folks.

Of course I understand that there's a difference between fighting with and fighting against Washington, but if the DAR is willing to take people who fought in the war and paid taxes afterward, well, I don't know that which side makes a difference.

All in all, Rob's very emotional and touching reactions to his family discovery made the episode for me. I did love him looking at the chapel and you could just see that he was trying to imagine what had happened in that very room. In contrast with the Helen Hunt episode, I much prefer episodes with reactions like Rob's last night.
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#1492

beden

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 8:12 AM

I call bullshit on Rob being invited to join the SAR. Maybe John Christopher East DID pay taxes that supported the Revolution, but Johann Christof Oest fought and possibly killed Americans in our War for Independence. AND ... in Rob's own words, Herr Oest "tried to stick it to George Washington".

I could be totally mistaken, but I think his suddenly becoming a "patriot" was extremely convenient for both Rob AND the SAR.


I call a maybe BS on this but accept that while it was clearly instigated by the production company, may actually be real...more or less. I'm a member of the DAR (my old grandmother got me and some female cousins in a million years ago) and we've had dealings with the SAR. It's a much smaller, much less known and much less discriminating organization than the DAR; they do good works, raise money for worthy causes and tend to be on the older and conservative side of things.

I can easily see them accepting in a relatively high-profile and young new member, even if his ancestor played both sides of the game, especially after the exposure of a national TV show. How many people know the organization even exists? Or that there's also a CAR (Children of the Revolution) for minors/school children?

I'm also willing to believe that his reactions were fairly genuine. While I dd absolutely nothing to earn anything in terms of recognition or any of that (my ancestor actually did risk his life and future and all of that when he joined the militia in a war no one really thought they'd win against arguably the best military on the planet at the time), it's way cool knowing my guy had the balls to lay everything he had on the line. I don't think I could do it, truth be told.
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#1493

ScrubMonkey

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 9:10 AM

My personal take on this episode, as well as Ashley Judd's: A family member applied to a genealogical society. In Rob's case, I think Chad applied to the Sons of the American Revolution (pure conjecture.) In Ashley's case, I think her father applied to the Mayflower society. This show gets wind of it, and next thing you know, the more famous family member is being filmed for this series.

Maybe it's just me, but Rob Lowe seems fake as the day is long. I once met him, just before his 'scandal' back in the 1980s that I am not sure young people today even know (or care) about. (Probably rightly so.) My take on him isn't any different than it was watching this episode - Mr. Monkey liked him even less.

The one good thing about the D.A.R. accepting the proof, and his being accepted into the S.A.R. is that now, maybe, the ordinary people who were refused since the 'case was locked' or whatever, can get in too. The D.A.R. are notorious for refusing to acknowledge proofs. Such as this poor guy.

I couldn't help but feel a little bitter on behalf of all those people who were told their ancestor was no longer accepted, when all along, the D.A.R. was wrong. Why weren't they on camera saying so?

ETA because "bitter" is not the same as "better."

Edited by ScrubMonkey, Apr 29, 2012 @ 9:11 AM.

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#1494

GeoBQn

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 10:15 AM

The one good thing about the D.A.R. accepting the proof, and his being accepted into the S.A.R. is that now, maybe, the ordinary people who were refused since the 'case was locked' or whatever, can get in too. The D.A.R. are notorious for refusing to acknowledge proofs. Such as this poor guy.

I couldn't help but feel a little bitter on behalf of all those people who were told their ancestor was no longer accepted, when all along, the D.A.R. was wrong. Why weren't they on camera saying so?

You raise a good point. This episode had me thinking about how more elitist organizations use genealogy, and how many people come from backgrounds that don't allow for such careful record keeping to get into organizations. The organizations can also set their own standards. I was talking to someone who had proof that his ancestors were on the Mayflower, but the Mayflower Society kept rejecting their application and he was convinced it was because he is Jewish.
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#1495

jjj

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 3:58 PM

Thanks for that story about the headstone, ChicagoCita -- that is remarkable!

I've only seen about half of the episodes in this series, but have they ever dealt with someone in the lineage who has been adopted? I don't do genealogy, and have an adopted parent, so wondered how a show like this would address that. So far, all the episodes I have seen deal with blood lines of ancestors.

I will say that the moment that made me laugh on the Rob Lowe episode was when he arrived in D.C., and we saw him striding purposefully in front of the Lincoln Memorial. I've worked at the Library of Congress (far away), and I was thinking, Rob, you are so lost, and you were on the West Wing!
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#1496

Tolteca

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 5:29 PM

The UK show did Nicky Campbell following his adopted line and was an interesting episode in showing how nurture affected the descendents.
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#1497

abbottrabbit

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 6:54 PM

The part that is most annoying to me is when they go to the Library of Congress or DAR, etc. and the head of the department is there to welcome them and the places are totally empty of any other people. It just makes them seem so 'special'.


I can usually overlook that kind of thing, but what steamed me in this episode was the way they showed him driving down a COMPLETELY EMPTY 14th Street, past the Washington Monument, on the way to the DAR. That area is never not swarming with people -- it's a major route out of DC into the VA suburbs, and I almost always get snagged in some sort of protest or festival when I have to drive it -- and I couldn't stop thinking of how much car and foot traffic they must've had to inconvenience to close off the street to get that footage.
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#1498

SunShine Gal

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 8:20 PM

I watch this show depending on who the celebrity is and I'm really enjoying these shows. The most recent one I watched was with Reba McEntire. It was interesting watching her try to deal with the information that some of her ancestors owned slaves and her astonishment that someone could actually sell a 3 year old child. Some time later she finds out that one of her ancestors was an indentured servant and he was all alone sent over here as a boy. She said she had a hard time sending her children to camp and couldn't understand how someone could send a little boy to another country alone and know that they weren't ever going to see them again. Telling these stories is so important. Life was different back then with some really hard circumstances. Some were forced on people and some were hard choices. Seeing how Reba handled the info and how she forgave that father was wonderful. I liked Reba as a person before but I also have respect for her.
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#1499

WileyCoyote

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Posted Apr 29, 2012 @ 11:51 PM

Maybe it's just me, but Rob Lowe seems fake as the day is long. I once met him, just before his 'scandal' back in the 1980s that I am not sure young people today even know (or care) about.

He always comes off as really fake to me too. Some of his characters have purposefully used that insincere quality he seems to give off... but that doesn't change the fact that (IMO) he projects vibes like "is the camera on?", and a sort of plastic-ness, if I can use that term, constantly--whether its for a role or not.

Edited by WileyCoyote, Apr 29, 2012 @ 11:56 PM.

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#1500

ShelleySue

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Posted Apr 30, 2012 @ 9:35 AM

The one good thing about the D.A.R. accepting the proof, and his being accepted into the S.A.R. is that now, maybe, the ordinary people who were refused since the 'case was locked' or whatever, can get in too. The D.A.R. are notorious for refusing to acknowledge proofs. Such as this poor guy.

I couldn't help but feel a little bitter on behalf of all those people who were told their ancestor was no longer accepted, when all along, the D.A.R. was wrong. Why weren't they on camera saying so?


You raise a good point. This episode had me thinking about how more elitist organizations use genealogy, and how many people come from backgrounds that don't allow for such careful record keeping to get into organizations. The organizations can also set their own standards. I was talking to someone who had proof that his ancestors were on the Mayflower, but the Mayflower Society kept rejecting their application and he was convinced it was because he is Jewish.



Mr. ShelleySue's great-grandmother was a member of DAR. Three years ago ShelleySue decided he wanted to join SAR. So we took the DAR application, submitted it along with information linking Mr. ShelleySue to his great-grandmother (marriage licenses, birth certificates, death certificates, etc) and the SAR accepted Mr. ShelleySue for membership. No big deal. After my husband received his acceptance letter my sister-in-law (Mr. ShelleySue's sister) wanted to join DAR. She sent the documents Mr. ShelleySue had sent to SAR along with her own birth certificate. We thought it was a done deal. But it turns out that Mr.ShelleySue's great-grandmother's application and information was no longer up to to DAR's rigorous standards so they denied the application. My sister-in-law tried to get a hold of someone who could help tell her exactly what research had to be redone, but no one called her back. She tried for about 6 months and then gave up. Now I realize it's because the ancestor merely fought in the Revolutionary War rather than paid taxes to support it. And, not incidentally, my sister-in-law isn't a celebrity. I bet that even with DAR being more demanding than SAR, they would be more helpful to a celebrity.

edited because I'm a horrible typist.

Edited by ShelleySue, Apr 30, 2012 @ 9:36 AM.

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