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ESPN's 30 For 30


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#481

bosawks

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Posted Jan 29, 2014 @ 7:09 PM

Oksana did not fare well after the Olympics.  She was basically an orphan and won very young--- she also had some pretty bad injuries and unfortunately fell into alcohol abuse, which hindered her pro career.  Today she has a clothing line and is in recovery.


My family still quotes her from her appearance on Oprah, "I'm not drunk I'm just Russian" in that incredible accent of hers.
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#482

catlover79

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Posted Jan 29, 2014 @ 8:07 PM

Actually, I'd like to see a profile on Oksana - also some of the "forgotten" skaters like Lu Chen, Debi Thomas, Tiffany Chin, Rosalynn Sumners, Linda Fratianne, Elaine Zayak, Holly Cook and Jill Trenary, to name just a few. That would make a good 30 For 30, I think.


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#483

BoldandRestless

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Posted Jan 29, 2014 @ 9:25 PM

Oksana is actually suing her old agents for $170 million for money she says she should have earned: http://www.thewrap.c...despread-theft/

 

For a while it seemed she had found peace, finding her long lost father and grandmother in Ukraine and discovering her Jewish roots, but now she seems to be in a bad way again. I actually read a couple of years ago that she was trying to shop around a reality show about her life. Probably for the best it never happened.


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#484

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Posted Jan 29, 2014 @ 10:06 PM

I'm sorry to hear that.  Although I thought Nancy should have won, I didn't wish any ill on Oksana.  I also think that hitting puberty made it hard for her to cash in on the lucrative skating circuit of the time - she was so incredibly small and waiflike in 1994 and then, she, well, wasn't. 

 

I think the last time I saw her skate was one of those crazy team ice skating events they used to have - she could still rock an arena, but her jumps were nowhere.

 

Actually, Nicole Bobek's story would also make a fascinating 30 For 30 story, but I don't think I'd be able to watch it.  What a magnificent skater she was in her prime - so much talent and beauty, all wasted and thrown away.  :(

 

ETA:  Nancy's outfits really were stunning, weren't they?  So elegant and simple.  I thought she was the best-dressed skater at the 1992 Olympics.  i also always loved her short programs for some reason - she had this crazy entrance into one of her jumps that I've never seen anyone do since.


Edited by SophiaD, Jan 29, 2014 @ 10:09 PM.

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#485

Tony Gancarski

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Posted Jan 30, 2014 @ 9:14 PM

I'd like to see "The Worth of Gold" about Michelle Kwan.


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#486

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Posted Feb 12, 2014 @ 12:37 PM

I think I was so depressed and in a dark place after the Red Sox lost to the Yankees in 2003, that I just blacked out that the Sox almost signed ARod in that offseason.  30 for 30 just reminded me that the fucking asshole douche was almost a Red Sox player.


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#487

topanga

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Posted Mar 10, 2014 @ 10:18 PM

The one thing I will never, ever, forget was one of those throws that he made like the one he made to throw out Harold Reynolds in this show. In my case, somebody on the Yankees hit a ball deep in the outfield. Bo fielded it and turned and made the throw to home plate as somebody was trying to score from second. My seat was in the lower deck, first base line, just a little ways past the base. I remember watching the the throw come in from the outfield no more than about 15 feet above the ground and ending up hitting the catcher's mitt just about chest high on a fly. The catcher essentially had to wait for the base runner to get there to tag him out. Lots of head shaking ensued. He was truly special.

(By the way, I also got to see Deon Sanders play baseball. Also amazing. It's hard to explain how much faster he was than everybody else. I saw him get a double on a routine ground ball between first and second. As a fan, you do the thing where you watch the hitter, then you follow the ball to see if it is going to get through or be fielded, then you look back to the runner to see where he is. In Deon's case, my eyes went to where runners normally were, but he wasn't there. Instead he was already on his way to second base. I remember it like it was yesterday.)

It's funny, but with this Bo Jackson episode, I didn't want to watch anything after they showed the terrible hip injury. It's like I just wanted to remember him for his greatness. I wonder if that's because I got to see him play, and I don't want to remember him any other way.

 

 

I enjoyed your entire post, JTMacc99. I watched this ep. for the first time tonight and loved it. Like you, I didn't want to watch the segment about Bo's hip injury and retirement. I actually changed the channel because it made me too sad to watch. I was a huge Bo Jackson fan in college and wished he could've had a longer career.

 

BTW, I loved your descriptions of Bo and Deion's baseball plays. Are you a writer?


Edited by topanga, Mar 10, 2014 @ 10:51 PM.

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#488

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Posted Mar 16, 2014 @ 10:00 PM

Some of the quotes in "Requiem for the Big East" slayed me - and most of them came from John Thompson. His "Et tu, Brute" about Syracuse leaving the Big East gave me a chuckle.


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#489

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Posted Mar 17, 2014 @ 2:32 PM

I thought the "Requiem for the Big East" piece was quite interesting.  I was a Big East junkie.  It was nice to see some of the coaches I hadn't seen in a while like Rollie Massimino, Lou Carneseca. 

 

I always had mixed feelings about John Thompson.  On the one hand, I admired him for sticking up for his players, especially Patrick Ewing, when they had to deal with the racial taunts at the games.  On the other hand, I never liked how he promoted the "thuggery" of how the team played, especially given the fact they were good enough to play "clean."  I also never liked his us against them schtick, the whole "Hoya paranoia" mentality.  I don't think he did his players any favors in that regard.

 

While I understand that Georgetown and Syracuse were the big dogs of the Big East for a long time, I thought that too much time was spent on them and their rivalry.  Seems like Thompson and Boeheim still don't like each other all that much, but I guess they respect each other.  However, I did agree with Thompson's "Et tu, Brute" comment because Syracuse leaving the Big East just. ain't, right.  Just like Maryland leaving the ACC just. ain't. right.

 

One thing I'll always remember about the Big East was the NCAA championship game between Georgetown and Villanova.  I remember hearing/reading all week leading up to the game that Villanova had no chance.  None.  Somebody came up with the moniker "Villanochance."  I didn't like Georgetown anyway, so I decided to root for the underdog.  The night of the game, I was sick as a dog, lying in bed watching the game.  The apartment walls were pretty thin and some yahoo in the apartment next to mine kept screaming long and loud every time Georgetown made a shot.  While I could understand his enthusiasm, by the second half I couldn't take anymore, my head was pounding, so I ever so politely asked him through the wall to please tone it down because I was sick and had a pounding headache.  He began to scream louder and longer.  When Villanova won, I raised my sick body off the bed and with as much strength as I could muster, I screamed, YESSSSS!!!!!!!!   I can still picture little Rollie running around on the floor.  There was no sound from next door.  Good night, asshole.


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#490

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Posted Mar 17, 2014 @ 2:50 PM

When I first began following college basketball in 1992, I remember the Big East was a huge deal. The Big East tournament was hyped to the skies. I loved the sport so much back then - except for the fact that my Rutgers team was in the Big East and always getting trounced.

Still hard to believe the Big East is no more.

Edited by yarnover, Mar 17, 2014 @ 2:50 PM.

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#491

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Posted Mar 17, 2014 @ 7:09 PM

The news of Jim Irsay's arrest and reports of other inappropriate behavior reminds me of the incredibly sad footage of his clearly inebriated father holding a press conference about moving the Colts that 30 for 30 showed in The Band that Wouldn't Die.

 

ETA, I caught the Big East doc this morning and it made me nostalgic as hell. That decade in the eighties was amazing. While I miss the Big East, I do agree with Boeheim that that era is long gone and the Big East I loved probably ended when they brought in Miami. 

 

I've always wanted to see a 30 for 30 on the Ewing Georgetown teams because I think they were one of the most culturally important teams in history. I'm not going to get a full episode, but I was glad that they addressed some of the issues involving Thompson, the media, Ewing and race that swirled around that team. I was one of those black kids that loved the take no prisoners/offer no apologies attitude taken by Thompson and his players.

 

I wonder what Rollie's shoe story was.


Edited by xaxat, Mar 19, 2014 @ 10:27 AM.

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#492

Danny Franks

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Posted Mar 22, 2014 @ 1:08 PM

The news of Jim Irsay's arrest and reports of other inappropriate behavior reminds me of the incredibly sad footage of his clearly inebriated father holding a press conference about moving the Colts that 30 for 30 showed in The Band that Wouldn't Die.

 

 

 

Sadder still because Jim Irsay seemed so aware of how badly his father had conducted himself, and was almost apologetic for it, in the documentary. He talked about how his father had once been a great man, before the booze got to him. I wonder if Jim will start asking the Indianapolis media "why'd you hang me for?"

 

Anyway, I love that documentary. As a Ravens fan, I have a dislike for the Colts, but it's nothing compared to what the people of Baltimore must feel, and The Band that Wouldn't Die encapsulates that all so beautifully. Easily one of the best 30 for 30 documentaries, in my book.


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#493

OaklandGirl

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Posted Mar 24, 2014 @ 12:04 PM

I've always wanted to see a 30 for 30 on the Ewing Georgetown teams because I think they were one of the most culturally important teams in history. I'm not going to get a full episode, but I was glad that they addressed some of the issues involving Thompson, the media, Ewing and race that swirled around that team. I was one of those black kids that loved the take no prisoners/offer no apologies attitude taken by Thompson and his players.

 

To the bold - I loved it, too, even with A.I.  I always love when people are their whole selves and comfortable in their own skin.  Thompson exemplifies that, and he brought that out of his players, too.

 

He had the best quote of the special to me when he talked about making the school all of that money... "...and what do we get?  The kids get to graduate.  I wanted to be rich.  People listen to rich people.  They pray for poor people."  He ain't lying.


Edited by OaklandGirl, Mar 24, 2014 @ 12:05 PM.

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#494

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Posted Mar 24, 2014 @ 1:49 PM

To me, John Thompson wasn't comfortable in his own skin.  That was his problem, that he seemed to constantly have a chip on his shoulder, and he transmitted that attitude to his players.  Granted, I have no idea what it was like being the sole black coach at that time in the Big East, so maybe his attitude was justified.  I lived in DC then, and I saw him at a couple of games, and all I know is that he didn't come off as pleasant at. all.  I guess he's more relaxed now though.  Money helps.


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#495

xaxat

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Posted Mar 24, 2014 @ 7:08 PM

 

 

Granted, I have no idea what it was like being the sole black coach at that time in the Big East, so maybe his attitude was justified.

 

He wasn't just the sole black coach in the Big East, he was a pioneer. Thompson got the Georgetown job in 1972, less than a decade after Bill Russell became the first African American coach in the NBA. Frank Robinson had yet to become the first black MLB manager, there were no black NFL coaches and outside of the HBUCs, I doubt there were any other black coaches in the collegiate ranks. 

 

I agree that he had a chip on his shoulder, but I think he had to be a really tough guy to get through the racist crap he and his players were subjected to back then.


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#496

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Posted Mar 25, 2014 @ 2:00 PM

Eh.  Frankly, if I'm honest, I thought he was an asshole.  Still do.


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#497

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Posted Mar 25, 2014 @ 8:15 PM

I find it hard to believe that Patrick Ewing weighed 240 pounds in college. He looked bigger than that.

Also, watching Mike Tranghese hug John Thompson made me laugh so hard. Mike looked so wee next to him. And Mike and Boeheim tearing up talking about Dave Gavitt made me emotional too, as did watching them tear down the basketball court while that melancholy music played.

I now love Duke above all others but I've lived in a Syracuse suburb my entire life and watching those early 80's games with my dad was awesome. I read a story the other day that Pearl would have stayed another year at SU if he knew that Derrick Coleman was coming. That would have been fabulous.

Kinda glossed over the 90's which was weird. It was like they never happened. And Boeheim saying he didn't care about winning the Big East as long as they beat Georgetown made me chuckle because if I'm remembering correctly, they got rolled by Louisville so yeah, remembering the G'Town win was probably the way to go.

This was one of the better produced 30 for 30's. It had a good buildup and I liked the intercuts of last year's SU/G'Town game.
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#498

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Posted Mar 26, 2014 @ 10:27 AM

 

 

Kinda glossed over the 90's which was weird. It was like they never happened.

 

What was weird to me was that they basically glossed over Connecticut.  Granted, they weren't as instrumental in building the league into a powerhouse but they sure as hell owned it the last 20 years.  Calhoun deserved a little more recognition in my opinion.


Edited by MrSarahWalker, Mar 26, 2014 @ 10:28 AM.

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#499

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Posted Mar 26, 2014 @ 2:49 PM

Yes, I forgot about UConn.  Not sure why they didn't talk about them more, maybe Calhoun just didn't want to participate as much as the others?  All I know is that they spent more time on Georgetown and Syracuse than I wanted. 


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#500

MrSarahWalker

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Posted Mar 26, 2014 @ 3:00 PM

I kind of get the focus on Georgetown and Syracuse because it was such a huge part of the beginning of the league.  But Georgetown was a joke for about 10 years and it wasn't much of a rivalry once the late 90s hit.  And for my money, the history of the big east can't be written without at least a footnote of that Georgetown-Uconn final between Iverson and Ray Allen.


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#501

yarnover

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Posted Mar 26, 2014 @ 9:33 PM

Also, watching Mike Tranghese hug John Thompson made me laugh so hard. Mike looked so wee next to him.

 

 

Same here. I actually rewound that!

 

What was weird to me was that they basically glossed over Connecticut. 

 

And Seton Hall! Not that Seton Hall deserved a separate segment, but I remember that school/team being a big deal when I started following college basketball.

 

But yeah - the lack of mention of UConn's achievements stood out to me as well.


Edited by yarnover, Mar 26, 2014 @ 9:33 PM.

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#502

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Posted Mar 26, 2014 @ 10:54 PM

And for my money, the history of the big east can't be written without at least a footnote of that Georgetown-Uconn final between Iverson and Ray Allen.

 

YES!  Where was this?!


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#503

xaxat

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Posted Mar 27, 2014 @ 12:28 PM

It felt like the producers were so eager to talk about how football caused the downfall of the league that they skipped everything that happened on the court after the nineties Miami/BC/Rutgers expansion. 

 

That meant the success of the basketball side, that continued until its very final game (Louisville as NCAA champ), was ignored.


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#504

UnfamousLoser

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Posted Apr 11, 2014 @ 6:43 AM

I just wanted to note that there will be two new episodes debuting next week:

 

April 15:  "Hillsborough"  About the stadium tragedy that left 96 dead.  This is the first in 30 for 30's soccer series:  http://espn.go.com/30for30/soccer

 

April 17:  "Bad Boys" About the late '80's/early '90's Detroit Pistons

 

Side note:  According to the Hollywood Reporter (http://www.hollywood...-stories-694728), the "Hillsborough" documentary will not be allowed to air in the U.K., because there is a new inquest into the incident.


Edited by UnfamousLoser, Apr 11, 2014 @ 6:48 AM.

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#505

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Posted Apr 11, 2014 @ 6:52 AM

See, this is why I'll miss Tubey. Because I'm FAR too lazy to have looked up that info myself and known these episodes were coming. I mean, the Bad Boys? My favorite pro hoops team in the history of ever? I am so there. And if Simmons has gotten his mitts on it I know it's going to be good.
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#506

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Posted Apr 15, 2014 @ 12:39 PM

I'm definitely going to watch Hillsborough, because I happened to be in London when it happened. I know next to nothing about soccer, but I was at the musical Blood Brothers, which takes place in Liverpool, the day after it happened. At the end, the cast sang an encore of a touching song from the show Tell Me It's Not True & dedicated it to the victims of Hillsborough. I think there may have been a collection taken up for the victim's families as well. It was very moving.


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#507

MrSarahWalker

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Posted Apr 15, 2014 @ 12:57 PM

Its truly a worthy subject for a documentary given the rather recent developments.


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#508

yarnover

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Posted Apr 15, 2014 @ 9:54 PM

"Hillsborough" was harrowing to watch but incredibly powerful. I'm still processing it.


Edited by yarnover, Apr 15, 2014 @ 9:54 PM.

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#509

UnfamousLoser

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Posted Yesterday, 04:43 AM

"Hillsborough"

 

Simultaneously heartbreaking and enraging.

 

I didn't know much about this tragedy.  I remember it on the news in 1989, thinking, "Oh, those poor people," and "I'm glad we don't have standing room audience areas in enclosed pens here" but that's about it.  I didn't realize it took TWENTY YEARS  before an independent inquiry into the incident was started.

 

Little moments stuck with me.  Like when Phil Scraton (author of Hillsborough:  The Truth) found out that when the dead were autopsied, the police found out which ones had alcohol in their system and did a search to find out which of the dead had criminal records.  So within a few days of the tragedy the "Blame the Victim" machine was already starting.

 

And when one of police officers found out that his original statement about the incident had been seriously altered by someone within the police department (sentences blacked out, entire paragraphs critical of higher officers crossed out) and a new, sanitized statement that he had never read, much less agreed to had been filed with his name on it he said (paraphrasing; I don't remember the exact words), "There's a phrase for that.  It's called statement tampering.  That's a crime.  I don't like criminals."

 

The director, Daniel Gordon, did a really good job.  I think this is one of the better 30 for 30's.


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