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Bang for Your Buck


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#31

Ms Chicklet

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Posted Jun 21, 2009 @ 9:53 PM

My stupid DVR garbled some of the episode and cut out the final segment. How did they rank?
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#32

Nightlark

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Posted Jun 22, 2009 @ 9:46 AM

I think the one with the pool got the highest rating. No one got more than about 70% though.
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#33

Bentley

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Posted Jun 28, 2009 @ 10:11 AM

Did anyone see the New York episode? Because I could swear that the first designer, Vanessa something or other, was a former contestant on one of those design star or top design shows. If I'm not mistaken she tried to coin her trademark style as "glamolicious" or something equally smarmy.

That was an uncomfortable episode especially the first two places shown because the homeowner is sitting there with the designer and you can just feel the tension as the designers' no doubt expensive choices are torn to bits. This is not a show to volunteer your place for unless your confidence is unshakeable. I wonder how many of the more insecure homeowners feel differently about their spaces after they've been on the show.

I was a little surprised that the most BFYB winner last night was the lady who seemed to get the harshest criticism. I think the black glass tile would have been a little overwhelming even if the cabinets above it had been white, and I love black! Not to mention my latent OCD tendencies would kick in every time I walked past that slightly off-center island... I liked the white kitchen best. That space felt so light and airy after seeing the first two cavelike spaces. As far as the painted brick, some of those old brick walls are really charming, and I'm not sure that painting it white was the best thing; it would have been helpful to be shown a pic of the wall before it was painted.
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#34

izabella

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Posted Jun 28, 2009 @ 12:34 PM

Did anyone see the New York episode? Because I could swear that the first designer, Vanessa something or other, was a former contestant on one of those design star or top design shows. If I'm not mistaken she tried to coin her trademark style as "glamolicious" or something equally smarmy.


Thank you - I was wondering where I'd seen her before! I think you're right - she was the glamolicious designer.

I did like that space, although I probably wouldn't have gone for that exact color scheme. It was a little dark. Plus the place was small, with no space for a dining table and no breakfast bar/counter either. I did like it overall, though.

I hated the kitchen in the second space. The black on the back wall was too dark and very jarring. The owner? designer? kept saying how it made the cabinets and wall recede, but I thought it made it stand out like a sore thumb.

The white place was nice, but it was too much white for me. Exposed brick isn't always pretty, depending on the brick, so I think they probably made the right choice to paint it.
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#35

bookss1

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Posted Jun 28, 2009 @ 9:55 PM

I'm not a big white person but I liked the white make over the best. The second was so dark with leather look counter tops, dark brown walls and black.
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#36

biakbiak

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Posted Jul 5, 2009 @ 4:56 PM

The $60k master bedroom show was such not a surprise, the third house was just so over the top better than the other two it was sort of sad. The second couple must have had a lot of structural issues or something because I am confused where all their money went.
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#37

bookss1

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Posted Jul 11, 2009 @ 7:04 PM

I liked all three (except for the fancy dresser like sink). For once I thought the critics were a little harsh. All the bathrooms had room constraints and they would not have come in on budget if they had to knock out walls and replumb. The first bathrooms complaint about no soap dish was ridiculous. I am not all that modern and I heard of a wet side and a dry side. The couple of people I know with these kind of bathrooms know the bathtub gets wet and that is why it is on the wet side. I also hear it is common in some foreign countries to have bathrooms like this. I wouldn't like the system but it isn't unknown. Since it also the master there isn't a great need for privacy. In fact in ANY bathroom I assume you would close teh door when showering or um the other anyway. That being said they all got pretty much back on their investment. Now why anyone would go nuts for a fancy bathroom in teh absence of other "goodies" I have yet to understand, but as a HGTV viewer it is sometimes as important as a yard or bedroom.
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#38

TheWereCow

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Posted Jul 15, 2009 @ 2:57 PM

The modern kitchen with the mojo seating was all right, but concrete floors? All I could think was that I'd have back spasms after cooking Thanksgiving dinner.


Oh, lordy. You have no idea. My parents' first floor is all stone, including the kitchen. Two hours of cooking and you will be hobbling around for the rest of the night. Agony. It only took my mother a few months to admit that maybe (just maybe) the stone in the kitchen was a horrible mistake.

I watched the basement episode last night. I thought the "winner" basement was gaudy. The granite was just hideous and the shag carpet was just wrong. I didn't mind the carpet in the theater room as much, since it at least fit the theme, but the Turkish marble in the bathroom? Isn't that a recipe for certain death? One slip on a wet puddle and there goes grandma. Oh, and how can I forget the highlighter-green room (pear my ass). Yuck.

I liked the second basement, with the exercise room and cute kitchenette. I actually think basement kitchenettes are a great idea, especially when you get into these high-end homes (my parents' neighborhood is full of them). And if you have teenagers, it's that much better. The kitchenette in my parents' basement was my teenage brother's domain. Suited him just fine.
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#39

EmbiggenedSoul

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Posted Jul 15, 2009 @ 4:22 PM

I watched the basement episode last night. I thought the "winner" basement was gaudy. The granite was just hideous and the shag carpet was just wrong. I didn't mind the carpet in the theater room as much, since it at least fit the theme, but the Turkish marble in the bathroom? Isn't that a recipe for certain death? One slip on a wet puddle and there goes grandma. Oh, and how can I forget the highlighter-green room (pear my ass). Yuck.


I know right, with the way those two experts vomited all over almost everything in that basement, I was shocked! when it got the full bang for its buck at $90k - which in the end, they could've almost put shag carpet on every wall and still have gotten it, since what really drove the estimates were the neighborhoods and size of the space. That media room carpet was HIDEOUS. And letting your 13-yr old grandson decorate the bedroom? Not a great idea unless he's that kid from Ugly Betty. Plus, word on the Turkish marble - where are the Slippery When Wet signs?
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#40

bookss1

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Posted Jul 15, 2009 @ 9:17 PM

Maybe kitchenettes in the basement are not such a good idea. I am a researcher and I was checking out basement fire safety today and learned that basement fires are one of the most dangerous fires. Some states actually do not allow basement apartments and firemen training has a separate class just for them. It's because the windows are usually high and small and there is one exit. Even if there is two exits they are easily blocked because a fire cuts off the exit. It is also where people store their furnace, gas etc.

That being said I have lived in two basement apartments.

Edited by bookss1, Jul 15, 2009 @ 9:18 PM.

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#41

csichick

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Posted Jul 15, 2009 @ 9:59 PM

Maybe kitchenettes in the basement are not such a good idea. I am a researcher and I was checking out basement fire safety today and learned that basement fires are one of the most dangerous fires.


As a former forensic fire lab person who helped investigate fires, there is a good resaon for this. Fires travel up and out.
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#42

selhars

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Posted Jul 16, 2009 @ 9:40 AM

This is not a show to volunteer your place for unless your confidence is unshakeable. I wonder how many of the more insecure homeowners feel differently about their spaces after they've been on the show.

Unless it's for even fewer than 15 mins of fame on TV by showing off your place, I don't get why anyone would even volunteer to be on the show. Why volunteer to have someone tear your place a part with picayune comments. I know I don't care what some designer whose done shoddy work themselves and a realtor think about my design choices, especially ones that may be changed or may not be relevant by the time I sell. It's volunteering to be verbally abused.
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#43

izabella

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Posted Jul 16, 2009 @ 10:16 AM

I know I don't care what some designer whose done shoddy work themselves and a realtor think about my design choices, especially ones that may be changed or may not be relevant by the time I sell.


I never understand why they comment on things like whether there are pictures on the wall or the color of the sofa. So what? How does that impact the return on the work they've done in the room?

If they're considering resale value of a remodeled basement or whatever, the lack of pictures on a wall is not going to make buyers offer less. They'll be looking at things like size, layout, windows and quality of the fixtures - the things that will be staying in the room.
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#44

Bitterswete

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Posted Jul 16, 2009 @ 12:03 PM

If they're considering resale value of a remodeled basement or whatever, the lack of pictures on a wall is not going to make buyers offer less.


While the premise of the show might be about how much resale value a renovation has added to a home, the fact that they have a designer as one of the "experts" shows the show is about the design choices the owners made, too. And, considering how important staging is considered to be when reselling a house, I think it makes sense.

If they're considering resale value of a remodeled basement or whatever, the lack of pictures on a wall is not going to make buyers offer less.


Some buyers are influenced by things like paint color, furniture, carpets, clutter, wall art, and other things that can either be changed, or will be leaving with the former owners.

Edited by Bitterswete, Jul 16, 2009 @ 12:10 PM.

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#45

selhars

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Posted Jul 18, 2009 @ 12:38 AM

Saw the 100-thou basement show -- in Columbus.... COLUMBUS!
Heck, that's East Coast major city renovation money!
100-thou for a basement, in a city where your return is only 60 percent.

Not that return is why owners remodel, but 100-thou...DAM*!!!

The first basement with the full-size SS appliances and stone arch..... I'd think that project could have been done for WAAY less money. Those finishes -- cabinet choices, flooring, stone wall, but whatever.....

I'm not picking on that basement, 100-thou for any basement IMO and for my needs would be over the top.

Edited by selhars, Jul 18, 2009 @ 12:56 AM.

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#46

bookss1

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Posted Aug 1, 2009 @ 6:43 PM

I was watching the master suite remodel at work today. I liked all of them. Even when they were not in my taste, like the antiques in the bathroom, they really fit the home owners personalities. It was cute because out summer worker (18) is moving into his first apartment. Last year he pooled with 5 guys and they kept moving out and in. This year he saved up for his own. He was fascinated by the "male" bathroom and even sketched it and took notes while he watched. I saw him put sea grass walls in big letters. They really cracks me up because we flood twice a year and sea grass is everywhere. I really liked the wall. I guess sea grass all over your steps bad-on wall pretty.
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#47

izabella

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Posted Aug 1, 2009 @ 6:52 PM

I didn't like the master suite that had the bedroom, sitting room, and bathroom as separate rooms. Actually, I liked the bathroom and the bedroom, but that sitting room was useless. The way it was set up, it wasn't at all cozy or inviting to actually sit in it. And they even said they didn't really use it for anything except to walk through it on the way to the bathroom.

They had a window seat, and that's it. If they'd had cozy chairs or something, then it would have been an inviting space they might have actually used.
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#48

bookss1

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Posted Aug 8, 2009 @ 7:26 PM

I just saw the 90.000 kitchens and I was not impressed. All three seemed so sterile and white. I am one of the few people who does not like an open floor plan. I have enough problems decorating without creating areas. So it could me it just seemed that the one kitchen was right next to the dining room table which was right up next to the livingroom. It seems so crowded. I ddi like the huge island in the one. My friends have one and its great. They can actually feed people dinner at it and have room to prepare the food. She got tired of food ending up on the floor.

Edited by bookss1, Aug 9, 2009 @ 5:29 PM.

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#49

TheWereCow

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Posted Aug 11, 2009 @ 9:15 PM

I despised both of them -- couldn't stand her hipper-than-thou demeanor, his sneering defensiveness and both of their inability to absorb what the designer and agent were saying without making a snotty contradictory comment.


Perfect description! I had the same reaction to them - get over yourselves!


I just saw the $65K kitchens, in Phoenix. I, too, could not stand the first HOs. Good lord. For a tract home in a family neighborhood, they way overdid it. There is just no way they are going to recoup their investment in the next 5 or so years, especially if they renovate the rest of the house, as they said they were planning to. In a family-type neighborhood, getting rid of the eat-in kitchen was just a stupid idea. People with kids want a place where they can watch the kids. Gah! They just drove me nuts with all their whining and protests.

I loved the mid-century modern kitchen. I don't think I'd have gone with the orange on the fridge surround, but I thought it was great on the island. It really annoyed me, though, when the realtor said, "People shopping in this neighborhood really want to preserve the mid-century modern look," and then she shit on them for preserving the mid-century modern feel of the house. Make up your mind! And I don't buy for a minute that the bamboo kitchen (with the wine-glass washer...the hell?) was a better investment. No storage space, one wonky work triangle, the stainless steel countertops...heck no.

The whole appraisal process is pretty subjective. The Realtor and designer just make it look moreso.
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#50

bookss1

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Posted Aug 11, 2009 @ 9:27 PM

I can understand why they consider staging but I wouldn't add it to the end estimate. Don't you think the Realtor will tell them to remove plates, plants etc. I would like to say it doesn't matter but from other shows were we have people leave because the decor was oriental and not even look at the actual house. Personally I just can't believe that a few decorative plates would plunge the price of a home significantly. Like the bathroom where you would have to put the soap dish on beside between the sinks instead of next to the sink.
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#51

dietcoker

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Posted Aug 14, 2009 @ 6:39 PM

I just discovered this show and I'm absolutely loving it. Even though I totally understand how hard it is to get critiqued on your 60 - 100 G investment, I get a kick out of how defensive the people get. For the most part, I find the designer's and the real estate agents comments to be dead on. Trying to rennovate myself, I absolutely understand the mistakes and money-saving decisions the people make. I know my renno has mistakes and we've just started.

$65K kitchens, in Phoenix

I liked the couple but I hated the mid-century modern kitchen with the orange.

90.000 kitchens

Was this the one with the shabby chic? I hated that design. I don't get the "distressed" look. Why do people spend so much money on cabinets that look like they have been through a flood and thrown down a mountain side?

100K basements

I really loved the basement that got the bang for the buck.
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#52

biakbiak

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Posted Aug 15, 2009 @ 3:10 AM

I literally loved all the Austin homes backyards and agreed with all of the homeowners choices but problem of this show is illustrated by the designers issue with the pool cover (that it was ugly) and she felt it would have been a better investment if you didn't go for their safety first look which is stupid.

Which leads me to the main issue that I have with the sure and their interpretation of "area" none of the others stood a chance in hell compared to the winner, it was glorious but I think the main reason was the view.

Edited by biakbiak, Aug 15, 2009 @ 3:10 PM.

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#53

dietcoker

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Posted Aug 15, 2009 @ 9:22 AM

none of the others stood a chance in hell compared to the winner

Agreed. But I think it's really the view that made the backyard so stunning which the others didn't have. Except for the infinity pool, the design itself didn't seem that much better than the others. Still, I thought they did an amazing job emphasizing the view.
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