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Toddlers & Tiaras


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#1

tvallthetime

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Posted Dec 13, 2008 @ 9:00 PM

Anyone else watch this show on TLC? These children in beauty pageants never stops being weird/disturbing to me. Why is it necessary to put all that makeup on a 4 year old? Why put so much emphasis on their looks and body at such an early age?

I was amused by the one little girl who wanted to buy a cow if she won.
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#2

chitowngirl

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Posted Dec 13, 2008 @ 9:13 PM

I'm so glad someone started this thread! That was like a real-life Little Miss Sunshine, from the road trips in the minivan right down to the chubby competitor (and some of those dance moves were very LMS too).

Edited by chitowngirl, Dec 13, 2008 @ 9:15 PM.

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#3

RoadTrip

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Posted Dec 13, 2008 @ 9:17 PM

Look on the "Baby Beauty Pageants" thread on page 7 for additional snark on this show!
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#4

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Posted Dec 13, 2008 @ 9:18 PM

Very true about the LMS parallels.

One thing I always notice about these shows: the moms are almost never attractive. It's like they are using their daughters to make up for their lost beauty (if they ever had it).
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#5

JLB81682

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Posted Dec 13, 2008 @ 9:18 PM

I'm shocked, abhorred and disgusted, yet drawn in like a 5 car pile up on the opposite side of I-95 during rush hour to these types of shows. I'll echo the LMS-esque feel of this show, my friend swears it's simply on to lighten the mood of the other baby beauty pagent shows.
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#6

RoadTrip

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Posted Dec 13, 2008 @ 9:22 PM

the moms are almost never attractive


And they are almost always overweight!
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#7

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Posted Dec 13, 2008 @ 9:28 PM

I am always stunned at how young these pageants start too. You are always hearing so and so has been competing since she was 10 months old! Pray tell, how does a baby "compete?" And to the mothers who say it teaches them stage presence and confidence, are those really skills that will be learned at such a young age?
And the money that is spent! I didn't catch this today but saw it the first time around. IIRC One family had 2 kids and were living in a small apartment. Didn't look like they were very well off either. Don't you think the thousands you spent on travel, makeup, hair, clothes etc could have gone to a better use?
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#8

jackiecarr

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Posted Dec 14, 2008 @ 7:17 PM

The part where Brianna Sullivan was all zombie-like was creepy.
There's a swimsuit competition "because kids are associated with fun and water"? Uh, ok. Is this competition taking place poolside? No.

I noticed more ethnic diversity than usual in this show, and I'm not sure whether to be pleasantly or unpleasantly surprised.
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#9

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Posted Dec 14, 2008 @ 7:30 PM

I liked the ethnic diversity too, it shows that there are senseless people everywhere. I thought that pageants were actually money suckers because all that tacky actually costs a lot. I can't believe how they pose with the fan of 20's.
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#10

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Posted Dec 14, 2008 @ 8:31 PM

It was so creepy watching this tonight. Seeing the little girls shake their buts and hips in suggestive was makes me sick. What's with all the makeup? Made them look like crossdressers.
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#11

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Posted Dec 14, 2008 @ 8:55 PM

Loved the $900 entry fee, so you could win a top prize of $1,000.
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#12

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Posted Jan 12, 2009 @ 11:22 AM

This show is premiering as a new series on TLC on January 27... some info on it here, as well as a sneak preview of the series premiere here.
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#13

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Posted Jan 12, 2009 @ 4:16 PM

Someone at TLC loves me and wants me to be happy...
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#14

bossygirl

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Posted Jan 12, 2009 @ 6:50 PM

The ads for this show creeped me out so much that I will never watch it. Don'y any of these people worry that sexualizing these babies may have contributed to one of them being found abused and murdered in her own home?

Yuck...

I don't know anyone personally who was on the pagent circuit - just one woman from my Mom's club who gave mucho bucks to sign her daughters up for a pagent - and when all of the folks got to the hotel on showday there was no pagent - and no money back either. Does anyone have any personal experience to say that this chicanery doesn't mess the girls up any worse than, say, playing with Barbies? Because then I would watch it to snark on the delustional parents.
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#15

CrazyinAlabama

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Posted Jan 12, 2009 @ 8:34 PM

My understanding from watching other shows about kiddie pageants is that at the current time (after Jon Benet's murder) that only relatives of the participants are allowed to watch and of course the many vendors and coaches or other support staff. I don't think anyone that isn't connected is allowed, but that doesn't stop every pervert on the planet from drooling over the kids online or from locating where they live with a little research.
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#16

HaveMetalIssues

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Posted Jan 13, 2009 @ 2:13 AM

My understanding from watching other shows about kiddie pageants is that at the current time (after Jon Benet's murder) that only relatives of the participants are allowed to watch

At least until Authentic Entertainment came along with their cameras and microphones... and TLC decided to purchase the project and air it. I see TLC is continuing its classy tradition of child exploitation.
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#17

Olie3367

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Posted Jan 13, 2009 @ 9:36 PM

Does anyone have any personal experience to say that this chicanery doesn't mess the girls up any worse than, say, playing with Barbies? Because then I would watch it to snark on the delustional parents.


As a former pageant kid, I can say that they can be a great, fun experience. I got started because I was a shy kid and someone suggested it to my mom to help me come out of my shell a little bit. After we did a few smaller ones, I decided it was fun and continued to compete. I say "we" because it was great mother/daughter bonding time. I was lucky in that my parents weren't delusional and my life didn't revolve around pageants. I did dance, gymnastics, soccer, basketball, etc. Pageants were just another hobby. The parents that come on these show usually are the crazy ones, but I can assure you that they aren't all like that. Yes, I had glitzy clothes, the hair/makeup, the fake tans, the retouched pictures, etc. but I knew that that was for pageants and I didn't need it to be beautiful. It's frustrating at times to see posters talk about how all pageant girls probably become trashy high school dropouts, get knocked up, and then work a pole for the rest of their lives. That's nothing like the path I've taken (I'm a happy, healthy, well-adjusted, former D-1 athlete, med student, etc.) and, looking back, I think some of the lessons I learned from pageants helped to get me where I am today.

So don't feel bad, SNARK!!
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#18

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Posted Jan 13, 2009 @ 9:51 PM

I see TLC is continuing its classy tradition of child exploitation.


You know, its sad but true. There's an awful lot of parents whoring their kids to The Learning Channel these days.
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#19

HaveMetalIssues

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Posted Jan 14, 2009 @ 12:28 PM

I got started because I was a shy kid and someone suggested it to my mom to help me come out of my shell a little bit.

I did dance, gymnastics, soccer, basketball, etc.


Hard to imagine that a kid with that many experiences really needs to add on pageant work to overcome shyness. I'm glad it is remembered as a positive experience for you but claims that pageants are needed to bring shy kids out of their shell never ring true to me.

Edited by HaveMetalIssues, Jan 14, 2009 @ 12:28 PM.

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#20

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Posted Jan 14, 2009 @ 1:53 PM

I was/am a pageant mom and the reason I say was is because when my child was younger she was in them regularly BUT I never put fake hair on my child, fake teeth, tan, etc. And she won without all that. Now she is older and more involved in school activities, theatre, dance, etc but she continues to do local pageants and scholarship pageants that include scholastic scores, community service, and the like. She does credit pageants with helping her deal with things like stage fright, public speaking, and fear of an audience. She was used to it at an early age and was never bothered by it at recitals and auditions whereas many froze on stage.

As to the only allowing parents and relatives in that is such bull. They can say that all they want to, but even immediately following the death of Jon Benet Ramsey anyone who had the five-thirty five dollars for a door badge was allowed in the ballroom and they still are. Most of these circuit directors could care less about anything but the money they can bring in. They do not ask who you have competing, if you have anyone competing, etc. They just tell you how much it is to get in, take your money and turn to the next person in line.
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#21

Paula in Playa

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Posted Jan 15, 2009 @ 10:26 AM

Make-up and young girls

Very interesting....
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#22

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 1:44 AM

Watching this show again, and I just noticed that one of the pageant moms said she had already started her daughter on shaving her legs--and the little girl isn't even close to puberty. That makes me really sad. Part of me died the day I started shaving my legs. I realize that not all women feel that way, but it's one of those things where once you start it's a life-long battle. And to start that so young! The girl's tights and dresses weren't enough to cover it up?
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#23

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 9:48 AM

The first time I watched this it was on Youtube, so I was glad to see it on TV whereI could make more things out. For example I didn't get that the African American girls' parents were both women! That's an interesting omission--on a scratchy Youtube screen, I thought the one wearing the tuxedo was a guy.

Anyway, I couldn't help but thinking that no way were the pageant directors going to let a girl in a homemade dress, lovely though it was, win the pageant. And the AM Mom did their makeup and hair, too. These pagaents have too many bottom feeders feeding off the pageant (gown stores, makeup, flippers, hairstylists). I once heard from some guy who was into professional dog shows say that if you don't pay to have one of the professional show handlers show your dog, you weren't winning. The right hand washes the left.
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#24

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 11:52 AM

I finally caught one of the repeats. I'm sorry to the pageant people, but are these parents just dumb or stage struck? The entry fee is $900 or close to it and the top prize is $1000. Then there's all the preparation that has to be thousands of dollars. You basically torture the kid with hair, makeup, tanning, pedicures, flippers, hair pieces (not to mention paying for it all) bascially so a child can parade on a stage in front of other kids and parents and maybe take home a cheap trophy. It sounds like the only smart person in the room (and she isn't too bright either) is the pageant director who is making money from this along with the other support crew of dress makers, etc. The part where the pageant director is encouraging the kids to strut their stuff and then turns around and says it's the media sexualizing these kids? Surely she doesn't think most people believe that. I'd much rather put the kids in soccer for a couple hundred dollars for entry, shoes, and uniform for an entire season and have them out exercising rather than being treated like hothouse "princesses." It was very, very financially unsound and creepy to me.
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#25

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 2:02 PM

The entry fee is $900 or close to it and the top prize is $1000.

Mr. Dumbpants and I were laughing at that for quite awhile afterward. Then on top of that, apparently there is a fee just to watch, travel, and all of the glittery stuff. I would imagine that some of those families spent upwards of $5000 just for this one, single pageant.

They can say, "Oh, well my daughter just loves it." No shit. Little girls like to play dress up. They could save a lot of time and money by going to some second hand dress shop and buying a bunch of dresses that their daughter and her friends can play with.

I know I shouldn't judge (but I'm going to anyway), but a lot of these people don't look like they make the kind of salary necessary to keep competing. How is this possible? I can't imagine having to suddenly drop a few grand just to play dress up for a day.
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#26

SprSeekritBroad

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 4:14 PM

I admit that I'm biased. That's so very true that many of these pageant parents (mothers) look like the money could be spent to much greater advantage somewhere else. I knew a mother and grandmother who had the sole child/grandchild in pageants. They were living off grandma's pension and daughter didn't work except to "date." They would drop hundreds on one outfit - custom made. The kid was in dance classes three or four afternoons a week, voice, drama, and who knows what else. I used to work with the seamstress who made a lot of her outfits. She hated the fussy handwork and I'd sit and spangle, glitter, crystal, sequin, etc the outfits for her not just for the pageant kid but even Olympic skaters. I usually wonder how much the parents are in debt just for pageant related expenses and have to think that very few if any of them ever make the money back in winnings and scholarships. I especially saw the stress on the kids in this episode and one even said I made the money back (entry fee). What kind of pressure is that to put on a little kid?
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#27

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 6:20 PM

Is it just me or was there editing in last nights replay? I didn't see Lexi's meltdown in the spray tan booth. Maybe I missed it though. There was an interview with a male judge that I don't remember from before too. (last name Flores..hmmm)
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#28

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 6:31 PM

Is it just me or was there editing in last nights replay? I didn't see Lexi's meltdown in the spray tan booth. Maybe I missed it though. There was an interview with a male judge that I don't remember from before too. (last name Flores..hmmm)


No, I saw it. They gave her a few instructions (hands up / down/ back / forwards/ etc). and suddenly that stuff hit her. Apparentally no one told her she was going to be sprayed with goop. She started screaming and they took her out of there.

Fun, fun, fun.
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#29

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 6:58 PM

I watched this show last night with my ultra-conservative mom. She was horrified at everything from the tanning, the hair pieces, the make-up, the flippers, and the dance routines that included some overtly sexual hip thrust movements. I've watched plenty of these kinds of shows before, so nothing really surprised me; the one thing we both agreed on is that this particular documentary was interested in showcasing the most extreme kinds of pageant moms, many of whom live vicariously though their kids (if I recall correctly, the lesbian mom had a nice figure and always had her own hair and make-up done, but the rest were quite overweight and didn't put much effort into doing their own hair and make-up; also, none of the pageant moms ever mentioned her own career, and except for the lesbian couple, the other moms seemed to be going to pageants solo).

I agree that pageants can have positive benefits that translate into the non-pageant world: more confidence in public, maybe better social skills/graces as the girls grow older, etc. But the elaborate dresses, make-up, hair, flippers, talent lessons, etc., not to mention pageant entry fees and transportation costs, are investments that can't be reimbursed; the investment's only worth it if the girl and her family equally enjoy the experience and the time they spend together. At such a young age, the girls probably can't make their own decisions about pageants, especially when mommy (or daddy, or grandma) gets such a thrill out of the experience.

This show also prompted me to think about child pageants as compared to other child hobbies that parents can become committed to in varying degrees. How different is the life of one of these girls from the life of a kid who aspires to be an Olympic figure skater or gymnast? Being a professional-caliber athlete at a young age requires many, many sacrifices - the time and costs of daily practice, coaches, maybe tutors, maybe injury rehabilitation, strict discipline over diet and exercise, etc. I've heard of young Olympic athletes' parents going into debt, putting a second mortgage on their house, and even quitting their jobs to be able to have the time and finances to support their kid. And all for what? Very few end up in the Olympics/at the top of their given sports - for every Nastia Liukin or Sarah Hughes who gets millions in endorsements, there might be 10,000 girls who never got there, and millions of dollars invested in their careers. Sure athletics promotes a healthy lifestyle, and these kids are probably pretty well-socialized and do well under pressure situations (hopefully), but how many slots are out there for professional adult gymnasts or figure skaters?

(And for every extreme pageant mom and daughter, there are probably 1,000 moms and daughters who do pageants only occasionally, moderate their spending, and have a great time. And likewise, plenty of kids who pursue sports, drama, acting, singing, dancing, cheerleading, etc. with full parental support, and get great stuff out of the experience like confidence, good teamwork skills, etc.)
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#30

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Posted Jan 19, 2009 @ 7:43 PM

Thanks PolkaDotty I guess I missed it, poor baby.

I'm confused about how the big time winner is determined. They do the runner ups and then there are 2 girls left with one being the Queen for the group. She gets $1000, crown and trophy and the other girl goes to the grand supreme poohbah and one girl gets that. What do the other girls in that group get?
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