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Music in Film: Scores and Soundtracks


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#121

MethodActor05

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 4:46 AM

I thought the Hunger Games was seriously elevated by Rue's Farewell and Abraham's Daughter. The movie was good on it's own, but those two pieces made that movie.

Missing You by John Waite in Warm Bodies was such an awesome, "this is weird but I'm going with it" moment.

#122

TudorQueen

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 3:54 PM

I saw Django Unchained and Beasts of the Southern Wild at different points this weekend. They are both wonderful, thought as different as two great movies can be, but they had at least one thing in common. Both had amazing scores. I'm stunned that Beasts didn't get nominated for its score, which made me want to dance with Hushpuppy and her community one minute, and stare in awe at the aurochs the next.

#123

snowprince

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Posted Feb 7, 2013 @ 5:33 AM

Simon & Garfunkel, The Graduate. Elmer Bernstein, The Magnificent Seven. That is all.

Edited by snowprince, Feb 7, 2013 @ 5:46 AM.


#124

Miss Kira

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Posted Feb 7, 2013 @ 8:16 PM

Question for the crowd: has the music ever made a movie for you? Like, without such glorious music, would your enjoyment be reduced?


Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World. Definitely. Some scenes were made perfect with the music- whether it was the original score or the classical pieces. The use of "Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis" brought me to tears both times it was used...it was a favorite piece of mine to begin with. Great movie anyway, but the music put it over the top. More recently, Moonrise Kingdom was helped a lot, too- by the use of Benjamin Britten's Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra and Noye's Fludde. Alexandre Despat's score was wonderful, too, but I think too heavily influenced by Britten (not that that's a bad thing) to get Oscar nominated.

My favorite film composer for a long time was James Horner...but he tends to steal from himself. Listen to his music from 1983's Testament and compare it to Field of Dreams. Lots of similarities if not near copies! I've gotten a bit bored with him.

Dario Marianelli's scores for Pride and Prejudice and Atonement, I could listen to over and over again.

#125

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Posted Feb 11, 2013 @ 12:37 PM

I'm a big Dario Marianelli fan. His work with Joe Wright has been fantastic, and he was totally robbed of an Oscar nomination for Jane Eyre as well.

(Plus, I love his name. Just say it out loud. It's very aesthetically pleasing.)

#126

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Posted Feb 14, 2013 @ 9:12 AM

One word: Glory. James Horner, as much as I pick on him for a recurring drumbeat that appears in several of his scores, knocked it out of the damn park when he composed the music for this--let alone the climactic piece Charging Fort Wagner, which genuinely brings this man to tears each time I hear it.

#127

TudorQueen

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Posted Feb 15, 2013 @ 4:58 PM

Glory is one of my all time favorite soundtracks. It still galls me that it wasn't even nominated for the Oscar. And yes, Charging Fort Wagner gets me all misty-eyed, too. Every single time. Right up there with King of Pride Rock from Lion King.

#128

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Posted Feb 19, 2013 @ 11:01 AM

I'm in the soundtrack vs score category. In the category of movie I wasn't fond of but really like the soundtrack : August Rush. I bought the soundtrack right after I saw the movie. Wasn't really excited about the movie but the music more than made up for that.

My first purchase for movie music would be from "The Big Chill". It ended up not having my favourite song on it and that really pissed me off. (You Can't always Get What you Want - The Rolling Stones).

I think "Tubular Bells" by Mike Oldfield is the soundtrack for the original "Exorcist". Oddly enough this was the most soothing music for me while I was in labour. Too scared to watch the movie but really like the music for it.

One of my favourite movies that ended up with no CD to go along with it due to the disgusting cost of trying to get the music rights has to be C.R.A.Z.Y. I ended up buying several CD's for one or two songs to get the majority of the songs in the movie. Have to say Jean-Marc Vallée has excellent taste in music and really knows how to incorporate it into his movies.

I really like the soundtrack to Romeo + Juliet (Leonardo and Claire Danes version) and it's another movie I've never watched.

#129

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Posted Feb 19, 2013 @ 11:26 AM

I have no interest in watching either the Saw or the Hellraiser movies, but I like both theme songs.

#130

Jeebus Cripes

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Posted Feb 20, 2013 @ 4:22 AM

I think "Tubular Bells" by Mike Oldfield is the soundtrack for the original "Exorcist". Oddly enough this was the most soothing music for me while I was in labour. Too scared to watch the movie but really like the music for it.

That is the weirdest thing I've read all day. Also, probably the most awesome.

#131

GG63

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Posted Feb 20, 2013 @ 9:11 AM

I stand corrected on "Tubular Bells" being the soundtrack for "The Exorcist". I got this information according to another source : "The opening theme, which was eventually chosen for the 1973 film The Exorcist, gained the record considerable publicity and introduced the work to a broader audience." So just part of the album was used.

That is the weirdest thing I've read all day. Also, probably the most awesome.


I'm guessing it's the part about me and not the music part you're talking about. I have very eclectic taste in music and find some of the oddest things soothing. Melodic and "sad" cello music is also a favourite for relaxing. I'm always on the lookout for movie/tv music that has that kind of cello music.

#132

Wiendish Fitch

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Posted Feb 21, 2013 @ 6:19 AM

I thought one of the most deliciously apropos uses of a song was the weary slow dance to Peggy Lee's "Is That All There Is?" in After Hours. Our protagonist is having the night from Hell in New York City, and the lyrics really highlight his half-hearted grasp at optimism.

Kudos to Martin Scorcese for not only directing a wickedly dark comedy, but daring to take his beloved NYC down a few pegs.

Edited by Wiendish Fitch, Feb 21, 2013 @ 6:20 AM.