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The 1960s: Things Were Different Then


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#991

DangerousMinds

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Posted Jun 20, 2013 @ 9:03 PM

 

I would think that in 1968 this would be a distinct possibility.

 

Also a distinct possibility in 2013, IMHO.


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#992

lkhllywd

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Posted Jun 26, 2013 @ 4:20 PM

 
I would think that in 1968 this would be a distinct possibility.

 
Also a distinct possibility in 2013, IMHO.


Yep. I think today's media make it harder to get away with, but I'm sure it happens.
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#993

Tom Bomb

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Posted Aug 29, 2013 @ 11:12 AM

http://gothamist.com...s_mad_men_5.php

 

 

There was discussion on this thread of CO status, and the lottery and Vietnam. Ran across the above link, just watched a linked '68 vid of Sammy Davis Jr doing an interview in  Canada, and they had a couple of 'DRAFT DODGERS' there for him to chat with!

 

There are other Gothamist pages that treat the decade, as well:

 

 

http://gothamist.com...s/madmenhistory


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#994

heather08

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Posted Sep 3, 2013 @ 11:31 AM

Also a distinct possibility in 2013, IMHO.

 

 

 

Definitely.  The very rich and famous, and people with connections, can circumvent the process. These are private schools and can do whatever they want.  The admissions process is only for the people who don't know anyone on the board of trustees or are not enough of a celebrity or high enough on the Forbes 500 list.  Didn't Henry's daughter go to that school? If so, he likely had an "in."


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#995

Inquisitionist

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Posted Sep 16, 2013 @ 2:54 PM

NY Times article about a house on West 94th Street between Central Park West and Columbus Avenue that was purchased for $18,000 in 1960, was the subject of a book called “The Street of the Flower Boxes" in 1966, and is now on the market for $4.995 million.


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#996

Tom Bomb

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Posted Nov 22, 2013 @ 7:36 PM

Dunno if mentioning another website is kosher, but here goes:

 

http://blogs.amctv.c...13851654096761

 

eta (sorry about the url)


Edited by Tom Bomb, Nov 25, 2013 @ 10:16 AM.

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#997

Bunnygal83

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Posted Feb 19, 2014 @ 9:52 AM

I have a question I've been thinking about during my re-watch leading up to the premiere. I've noticed, especially in the earlier seasons, that women like Betty, and also Megan tend to have a knee-length coat that matches their dress exactly. A good example is when Betty and Don went to dinner with Lane and Rebecca:

 

Mad%2BMen%2BMad%2BStyle%2BBetty%2BDraper

 

 

Was this common in the 60's? Were clothes less expensive as they are today, or is it just because of Don's income that Betty and company could afford these outfits, or were the coats sold with the dress?

 

I asked my mother, but she's 54 and doesn't really remember. 

 

 

Also, I'm sure this has been covered, but what did Trudy do all day before she had Tammy? She and Pete had a small apartment, and a cleaning lady. Sounds good to me!


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#998

Sister Magpie

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Posted Feb 19, 2014 @ 9:58 AM

Also, I'm sure this has been covered, but what did Trudy do all day before she had Tammy? She and Pete had a small apartment, and a cleaning lady. Sounds good to me!

 

 

She's involved in society stuff--clubs, charities etc. 


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#999

txhorns79

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Posted Feb 19, 2014 @ 8:26 PM

Was this common in the 60's? Were clothes less expensive as they are today, or is it just because of Don's income that Betty and company could afford these outfits, or were the coats sold with the dress?

 

If you've ever watched the show That Girl, (which ran from 1966-1971) the main character had a number of these types of outfits, so I would think it was a common trend at the time.  I believe the coats were sold with the dresses, or alongside the dresses.  My guess would be a woman would not have a lot of these types of outfits (or would mix and match coats) because it's not very practical to have one coat that only goes with one dress.  

 

And just as an aside, also in That Girl, in an episode that takes place in 1970 (but probably was filmed in '69), I think, she wears a variation of Peggy's pantsuit of power. I thought 1968 seemed very early for that outfit, but I guess it could just be Peggy having one of her few fashion forward moments, and those style outfits did start appearing around that time.       


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#1000

JudyObscure

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Posted Feb 21, 2014 @ 4:16 PM

Doris Day wore a lot of those matching dress and coat numbers in her movies. That Touch of Mink 1962, includes a fashion show that ends with a mink trimmed coat over a matching suit. She's dating rich man Cary Grant and he wants to buy her some clothes. Doris just lets him -- the slut!;)
https://www.youtube....h?v=Zc_ILvkX4Ko
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#1001

CousinAmy

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Posted Mar 30, 2014 @ 3:26 PM

I wore a dress-and-coat to my ninth birthday party, which was held in our backyard. All the other girls were wearing frilly party dresses, and my mom thought it was appropriate for me to look sophisticated. I can joke about it, but it still stings when I see the pictures. 

 

But on a woman? I think they were smart and chic. They came together, like a suit - you wouldn't buy the dress without the coat/jacket. And it wasn't always appropriate for women to wear sleeveless dresses until the late 1960s - so in the earlier part of the decade it "finished" the outfit for you. 


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#1002

lucindabelle

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Posted Apr 2, 2014 @ 1:01 PM

A suit is a good way to think about it. The coats were lightweight, so really only for spring. I have one or two bought in the past ten years like that (the trend came back, for a minute). I think it's very elegant.


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#1003

Inquisitionist

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Posted Apr 3, 2014 @ 8:02 AM

Were clothes less expensive as they are today

 

 

My recollection is that they were comparatively more expensive.  My mom saved the family tons of money by making most of my outfits and hers, as well as some for my brothers.  Today, given the cheap labor and mass production in Third World countries, a finished garment costs about the same as fabric.


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#1004

oceanblue

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Posted Apr 8, 2014 @ 10:45 PM

By the time of Mad Men, actual personal valets had become a lot rarer than they were in the previous century. The term was practically code for "kept boytoy."

 

 
 
Late to the party on this, but I now have a new understanding of Mr. French on "Family Affair".  

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#1005

suomi

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Posted Apr 13, 2014 @ 11:59 PM

The dress/coat ensemble was definitely desired, and timeless. Think: Audrey Hepburn, Babe Paley, Dina Merrill, Gloria Vanderbilt, Queen Elizabeth, the Duchess of Windsor, and of course Jacqueline Kennedy.


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#1006

LeDucDiableBleu

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 11:49 AM

The matching dress and coat is done very well today by the Duchess of Cambridge (Kate Middleton). Even on their current Australian tour she's already worn two or three of these type of ensembles, and a pillbox hat.


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#1007

scowl

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 3:39 PM

Thank you, Mad Men. I hated those sliding aluminum glass doors!

 

We had a can of WD-40 next to one that constantly got stuck. We had the stupid thing adjusted over and over and it would work for a few months and get stuck again. I will never forget being late to school because I couldn't get it to shut. Sliding it back and forth a dozen times, checking the track, spraying more WD-40, praying. I always left through the front door after that.

 

And when the energy crisis hit, these damn things leaked air like an open window. We taped up the ones we didn't use during the winter but the one we still used whistled whenever the wind blew through it. 


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#1008

PRgal

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 4:56 PM


Also, I'm sure this has been covered, but what did Trudy do all day before she had Tammy? She and Pete had a small apartment, and a cleaning lady. Sounds good to me!

 

Women's groups like Junior League, hospital guilds and other charitable and service groups.  Even today, Junior League keeps women quite busy - and many of us have full time jobs!


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