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Walter Bishop: The Lunatic Fringe


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#121

Money Magnet

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Posted Oct 19, 2011 @ 11:38 AM

At the same time though... Walter has his own relationship with Olivia. Always has, because their relationship goes back just as far, to the cortexiphan trials. (In Subject 13 this was made clear when he said "this girl is special to me"). So for this version of Olivia to show kindness and concern for this version of Walter is not "replacing Peter" - it's just a new exploration of their existing association with each other.

There's no reason why both Peter and Olivia can't each take care of Walter in their own ways. Walter's relationship with Olivia is not as obsessive as his with Peter, however. The Walter-Peter-Olivia relationship is three-sided, and Walter-Olivia is the third side. I think it is not quite an equilateral triangle however. The Walter-Peter relationship is still the most pointed.

#122

zwhippersnapper

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Posted Nov 5, 2011 @ 4:12 AM

So for this version of Olivia to show kindness and concern for this version of Walter is not "replacing Peter" - it's just a new exploration of their existing association with each other.


I know, I keep being reminded of the typewriter scene between Walter and Olivia in "The Last Sam Weiss". The difference is, the relationship in the old timeline was more like family, with Walter offering breakfast etc. While in this timeline, Olivia is the guardian, and Walter keeps reminding himself that she's not family, and he'll be sent back if he's useless. I also sense quite a bit of pity from Olivia besides her kindness and concern. I'm rambling here, but I guess what I'm trying to say is Walter and Olivia have a good relationship, but Walter needs family - Peter in his life, to keep him whole and bring him joy.

Speaking of which, I've been wondering about Walter's lack of joy this season. This is not a man who'd marvel at little things like seat warmers, or do an exploding Mentos + coke experiment in the lab. Except for the time spent with Aaron (I call him fungus boy mentally) in the lab, I don't think I've seen Walter have fun like he used to. I guess we got our answer in 4.05 - he's been punishing himself, telling himself he doesn't deserve joy. Oh, Walter :(

Edited by zwhippersnapper, Nov 5, 2011 @ 4:35 AM.


#123

marie81

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Posted May 5, 2012 @ 6:12 PM

Are we to take it that Walter was abused or mistreated at St. Clare's?

#124

jophan

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Posted May 5, 2012 @ 6:23 PM

Oh, it wouldn't surprise me at all. From what we saw of the place in "The Equation", I don't think much healing was going on. I also think that Walter's line in "Grey Matters" about making someone crazy to help resist interrogation could have applied to himself.

#125

marie81

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Posted May 5, 2012 @ 6:32 PM

Walter always seems terrified about even visiting the place. Then his reaction towards that Janitor in last night's ep really made me wonder.

#126

Money Magnet

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Posted May 6, 2012 @ 3:16 PM

It's time for my semi-annual praise post for the great John Noble. Inspired by rewatching "Brave New World Part 1" and realizing that even when I think an episode has some problems, he always is the reassuring, grounding eye of the hurricane.

I recently stumbled across this checklist of what makes a great classical actor... if you are a Noh actor (Japanese classical drama). Maybe this comes from another culture, but it seems to encapsulate perfectly everything that he can do.

Hana (花, flower): the true Noh performer seeks to cultivate a rarefied relationship with his audience similar to the way that one cultivates flowers. What is notable about hana is that, like a flower, it is meant to be appreciated by any audience, no matter how lofty or how coarse his upbringing. Hana comes in two forms. Individual hana is the beauty of the flower of youth, which passes with time, while "true hana" is the flower of creating and sharing perfect beauty through performance.
Yūgen (幽玄): an aesthetic term used to describe much of the art of the 13th and 14th centuries in Japan, but used specifically in relation to Noh to mean the profound beauty of the transcendental world, including mournful beauty involved in sadness and loss.
Kokoro or shin (both 心): Defined as "heart," "mind," or both. The kokoro of noh is that which Zeami speaks of in his teachings, and is more easily defined as "mind." To develop hana the actor must enter a state of no-mind, or mushin.
Rōjaku (老弱): the final stage of performance development of the Noh actor, in which as an old man he eliminates all unnecessary action or sound in his performance, leaving only the true essence of the scene or action being imitated.
Myō (妙): the "charm" of an actor who performs flawlessly and without any sense of imitation; he effectively becomes his role.
Monomane (物真似, imitation or mimesis): the intent of a Noh actor to accurately depict the motions of his role, as opposed to purely aesthetic reasons for abstraction or embellishment. Monomane is sometimes contrasted with yūgen, although the two represent endpoints of a continuum rather than being completely separate.


To this I would add, the very special quality of John Noble the actor, which is the endless invention and playfulness he brings to every episode.

Edited by Money Magnet, May 6, 2012 @ 3:21 PM.


#127

jophan

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Posted Aug 20, 2012 @ 11:24 AM

There's a Twitter campaign to wish John a happy birthday, today.