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Mad Men Food and Drink: Canapes and Cocktails


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#1

GraydonCarter

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 2:33 PM

Along with swinging night clubs came the cocktail. And you can't have a proper cocktail party without Hors d'Oeuvres, the colorful, tasty foods on tiny, crunchy foundations: the canape assortment. It takes ingenuity and an eye for color to make up a set of smart canapes. Add to the platter a few pickles, stuffed olives, bits of well-seasoned vegetables, some wrapped in bacon and grilled, some vegetables or fish tucked in a cornucopia of cheese, and you will have a plate of Hors d'Oeuvres that will make the cocktail hour truly enjoyable.

So darken your smoke filled rooms, open the bottles, shake the ice, put on some Cuban mood music, and let your swinging cocktail party begin.

While we are still standing, remember, unlike then, do not drive while drinking or you'll take little ride up the river!

This thread is for food and drink during and within the episodes.

#2

unclewiggly

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 2:49 PM

For inspiration (or perhaps a walk down memory lane):

B-B-Que Tricks

Knudson's Very Best 1958 and Knudson's Best 1959

Party Cake Houses!

and much more at the [url="http://www.lileks.com/institute/gallery/index.html""]Gallery of Regrettable Food[/url]

#3

dreamy

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 5:03 PM

If we're having classic daiquiris tonight, what's the best food accompaniment (I don't think they were doing quesadillas in Scarsdale in those days)?

Edited by dreamy, Sep 6, 2007 @ 5:03 PM.


#4

GraphicDesigner

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 5:48 PM

My 800+ page 1952 American Woman cookbook has a total of 5 (5!) recipes for canapés. The other appetizers are fruit juices or soup.
Here's a recipe for cheese and olive canapés.

CHEESE AND OLIVE CANAPÉS

6 portions prepared bread
3 Tablespoons cream chese
Olives stuffed with pimentos
Garnish of red pepper or pickled beet

Spread on the prepared bread a paste made by mixing equal proportions of cream cheese and chopped stuffed olives. Garnish with a quarter inch border of the chopped olives and a star of red pepper or pickled beet in the center of each canapé.

I guess there's always deviled eggs, also.

#5

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 7:20 PM

When I was growing up in the seventies, my mother used to make this dip thing whenever we had "fancy" parties that I always thought was very "50's". It was a layer of cream cheese the size and shape of a plate topped with a layer of egg salad and a layer of caviar on top (usually the supercheap "lumpfish" sold at the local supermarket.) She stopped serving it as she got more health conscious. A few years ago, my roommates and I had a valentines day party and I wanted to make something red so I thought I'd do that dip thing with red caviar (lumpfish). I called my mom to ask for the recipe and she got all weirded out by the memory...like I was asking her how to use a crackpipe. Everything she eats and serves nowadays is low fat or fat free.

#6

Rinaldo

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 7:49 PM

I have a couple of canape-type things to contribute, out of the immortal Peg Bracken's Appendix to the I Hate To Cook Book. They're actually tea sandwiches, but I think they have the right yummy period feel about them.

CUCUMBER DILLWICHES

Flatten thin-sliced white bread with a rolling pin (which is a good idea for any tea sandwich) and cut it in rounds with a biscuit cutter. Unless you have square cucumbers.

On each, spread butter. Put a thin slice of peeled cucumber on the butter, sprinkle fresh chopped dill or the dried kind on the cucumber. Then put another buttered bread round on the top. That's all, but they have a very nice ladylike look.

ALMOND CHICKWICHES

Soread bread slices with softened with softened butter. (You cut and trim these later.)

For the filling, mix
1 can minced chicken
1 small jar pimento pieces, drained and chopped
1/2 cup chopped salted almonds
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 teaspoon minced chives (or chopped green onion tops)
1 tablespoon parsley, chopped
2 or 3 drops angostura bitters, if you like

Spread it on half the bread slices, put the other buttered bread slices on top, trim the crusts, and cut each sandwich into 4 small squares or 4 small triangles.

----

I've actually made the almond chickwiches on occasion, to bring to things like office parties. However unfashionable, they're very tasty. (I've never used the bitters, and I don't bother to trim the crusts.) People usually have trouble figuring out the components, but they all get eaten up.

#7

MariaMax

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 7:53 PM

http://www.lileks.co...dsen/index.html

I just spent about an hour with Mr Max, looking at these and laughing our asses off! This is the funniest, most disgusting thing I have seen....maybe ever!
Thanks for the link, Unclewiggy!

Edited by MariaMax, Sep 6, 2007 @ 7:54 PM.


#8

Bitchy McSnappy

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 8:48 PM

Dips du Jour!

Tonight's menu for enjoying Mad Men with the Widow:
Benedictine Dip & Chips
Kooking With Kraft Shrimp Dip (Finally, a use for those Sea Monkeys)

Tonight's bevs
Bourbon & branch
Proper Martinis

Benedictine
Soften an 8 oz. package of cream cheese (Philly is the best)
1 cucumber grated on a box grater and drained through cheese cloth or tightly woven, clean 12" x 12" square of unbleached fabric (squeezed/drained dry as the Sahara - it's a pain, but maintains the dip's integrity)
1 tsp. onion juice (or to taste)
1 tsp. worchester sauce (or to taste)
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
pinch salt
good shake Frank's hot sauce (to taste) or a pinch of ground white pepper
Mix all ingredients, until combined, in a bowl. Serve in silver chip 'n dip server with ridged chips and rye Melba toast.

Kooking with Kraft Shrimp Dip
Soften an 8 oz. package of cream cheese (Philly is the best)
Drain a 4 oz. can shrimp
1 tsp. onion juice (or to taste)
1 tbs. cocktail/chili sauce or ketchup
Optional: 1 tsp. chopped fresh dill (I really mean "optional" - my Swedish mom loves it, I'm not a fan)
Mix all ingredients, until combined, in a bowl. Serve in a class or ceramic chip 'n dip server with ridged chips and Ritz crackers.

Bourbon & Branch
To taste - or, take a Derby glass and fill to the bottom of the design - usually 1/2" to 1" - with good quality bourbon - I suggest Maker's or Woodford. Add ice (optional) and fill with water.

Proper Martini
Pour dry vermouth in glass, swirl to coat and dump out vermouth. Add chilled gin (keep it in the freezer with the vodka). Add a twist from a lemon rind. Toss in two jumbo pimento-stuffed olives.

Enjoy.

The Widow and I will be on the settee, debating: Don's wife - complete doormat or master manipulator? And, " Girdles, back in the day or a lot like Spanx?

#9

dreamy

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 9:53 PM

Is this a cash or open bar?

#10

A Little Edgy

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 10:57 PM

My God, man! It's 1960! Where the hell are the rumaki?

#11

GraydonCarter

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Posted Sep 7, 2007 @ 12:03 PM

The only drinks last night by name were of the Italian variety, still very popular on the streets of Rome, ordered by Salvatore. Campari is an alcoholic aperitif obtained from the infusion of bitter herbs, aromatic plants and fruit in alcohol and water. Sambuca, the anise-based liquor, was served with Espresso beans after dinner.

#12

Auntie M

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Posted Sep 7, 2007 @ 12:41 PM

The authentic 1965 gold bound Souvenir Edition of the Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book I inherited from my Grandmother has a recipe for "Luau Bites" (aka rumaki, but more festive in its celebration of our 50th state and less "foreign"), Creamy Onion Dip ("Blend 1 1/2 cups dairy sour cream and 2 tablespoons packaged onion soup mix. Stir in 2 ounces blue cheese (crumbled), and 1/3 c chopped walnuts."), a suggestion for Appetizer Skewers with mushrooms, cocktail wieners, green olives, and cubes of American cheese wrapped in bacon, or a Hot Mexican Bean dip which starts with a can of pork and beans and American cheese, continues with 2 kinds of salt, and ends with bacon and potato chips.

None of the beverages has alcohol. Because menfolk were in charge of the bar.

#13

GraphicDesigner

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Posted Sep 7, 2007 @ 12:42 PM

I don't remember - what were they drinking at P.J. Clarke's?

#14

GraydonCarter

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Posted Sep 7, 2007 @ 1:50 PM

When Ken grabbed Pete's glass for a refill, I figured it was draft beer. But the glasses looked like highball glasses.

#15

A Little Edgy

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Posted Sep 7, 2007 @ 3:19 PM

Creamy Onion Dip ("Blend 1 1/2 cups dairy sour cream and 2 tablespoons packaged onion soup mix. Stir in 2 ounces blue cheese (crumbled), and 1/3 c chopped walnuts.")


Now that just sounds too darn good for words. It's practically pure fat, but the combination of blue cheese and walnuts with some salt-onion powder-MSG in a sour cream base actually has me salivating.

#16

unclewiggly

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Posted Sep 7, 2007 @ 5:44 PM

I just drooled at the thought of bleu-cheese & walnut spiked onion dip. My gawd...

#17

Bitchy McSnappy

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Posted Sep 7, 2007 @ 7:55 PM

"My God, man! It's 1960! Where the hell are the rumaki?"

A Little Edgy, My ex's mother used to always ask us - after we'd been to a wedding, party, you name it... "Did they serve rumaki? That's soooo classy!" Now, she had that attractive Harvey Firestein voice, which made her remarks so much fun!

In between puffs of her ever-present cigs, she'd often say, "The secret to happiness is nevah paying retail! Guess how much I paid for this?"

When my mom met his mom and she said that, and my mother said, "We're gentiles. We pay retail. We don't re-cover." (this being said about a horrible couch his mom recovered in $1.98 a yard, shrimp-colored polyester shantung - we didn't have to guess how much she paid for it - she told us). At that time, I wanted the floor to swallow me up. My brother just laughed.

Matriarchs not meshing? You bet! Red flag? In retrospect, hell yeah.

God rest her soul, I miss that old broad.

Rumaki? Sooooo classy and swanky!

Got the Easy Bake fired up... Trying to figure out what I can make in it besides quiche that adults like. I welcome all suggestions (cooking with light bulbs - how fun!). It's one of those early ones (turquoise) from the '60s and I have the cookbook, but there are no grown-up nibbles. This maybe one of those "in theory, it sounded like a good idea" ideas.

Cheers!

#18

goobaletta

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Posted Sep 9, 2007 @ 6:10 PM

A friend of mine is making rumaki for a soiree she's having soon. The next time she mentions it I'm going to fall over laughing. I just know I shall! And I'll be thinking of $1.98 shrimp-colored polyester shantung the whole time.

Meanwhile, I can't believe there aren't any fondue options posted yet. Didn't Pete and his shrew get a fondue pot for a wedding gift? I found some on the current Kraft website that range from appalling to I'd try it at someone else's party but am too much of a snob to serve it at my own.

The following is one I can see Betty serving at one of her parties:

Artichoke Swiss Fondue Dip

#19

MrPapercut

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Posted Sep 9, 2007 @ 6:50 PM

This is the recipe I use for fondue parties. It's pretty close to the one my mom used in the '70s. I, however, use an electric fondue pot -- my mom used one of the old-school chafing dishes that has a little pot of Sterno for a heat source. The temperature was impossible to control, and unless your guests finished off the fondue fast it would harden into a burnt foul-smelling crust at the bottom. Electric works a lot better.

I posted this already in the nostalgia thread, but my mom also used that chafing dish for one of her other signature dishes: cocktail-size Vienna sausages floating in barbecue sauce.

For canapes, she liked to make finger sandwiches with cream cheese, crab meat and onion powder on Wonder Bread. She called it "Crab Rangoon," and it wasn't till just a few years ago that I learned that she'd misnamed them (the real Crab Rangoon is a deep-fried wonton, not a sandwich.) Underwood Deviled Ham often found its way into canapes at my house, too.

#20

attica finch

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Posted Sep 10, 2007 @ 10:48 AM

The secret to happiness is nevah paying retail!

Aww, Bitchy, I love her! One of my favorite colleagues ever was an old-school merchant, ever-present cig, whisky-soaked voice, who was a buyer for a Luxury Goods Retailer. Although she spent her days finding stuff to ply to the rich, her personal motto was "Any schmuck can pay retail." I've lived by those words ever since. And I'm a little misty right now.

#21

A Little Edgy

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Posted Sep 10, 2007 @ 1:51 PM

I found some on the current Kraft website that range from appalling to I'd try it at someone else's party but am too much of a snob to serve it at my own.


Actually, fondue is making a comeback, as well it should. Like its similarly overexposed cousin, quiche, fondue is delicious, easy to make and authentically European in its original form. (One of the reasons both quiche and fondue were exiled to snobfood Siberia was the tendency of Americans to import a good thing and overdo it by adding unnecessary layers of complexity to something that was tastiest when it was simplest. By the way, did you know that adding anything except onions to quiche lorraine transforms it from a quiche to a tarte in French? A quiche lorraine (the standard bacon and cheese tart) with onions is a quiche alsacienne, but a mushroom quiche is a tarte aux champignons. Perhaps that improves the style value.)

I do wonder, though, if fondue was common as early as 1960. I associate it more with the later 60s and 70s, but perhaps I really am confusing it with quiche.

ETA: Upon second glance, I see that the book in the link above was published in 1998. Well, then, fondue SHOULD make a comeback. I'm sure it will, any day now.

Edited by A Little Edgy, Sep 10, 2007 @ 2:27 PM.


#22

Rinaldo

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Posted Sep 10, 2007 @ 3:26 PM

I do wonder, though, if fondue was common as early as 1960.

At least in NYC, it does seem to have been on the radar by then. I found an online history of the Americanization of fondue that says:

"in 1956 famed chef Konrad Egli of New York’s Chalet Swiss restaurant introduced Fondue Bourguignonne, the fondue method of cooking meat cubes in hot oil. Suddenly, cooking cheeses and meats fondue-style – in a communal pot – became the vogue. Its popularity was further boosted by the publicity-driven debut of a chocolate fondue at the Chalet Swiss in 1964. Throughout the 1960s and into the 1970s, fondue remained the focus of friendly get-togethers across the nation." So although it may have blossomed a decade later, it was definitely around at the time, for those who liked to be in the know.

Edited by Rinaldo, Sep 10, 2007 @ 3:27 PM.


#23

Bitchy McSnappy

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Posted Sep 10, 2007 @ 8:31 PM

Attica,
I miss Skip's mom - oh, was she crass, loud and just so non-Southern (crass, loud and - maybe it was her accent - but when she cussed, it sounded worse than normal). The first time I met her, she was - like a sailor or stevedore - cursing at her husband across a large yard. My mom was a grit your teeth, smile and hiss vitriolic epitaphs at my dad. Nothing you'd ever hear outside of being within 6" of my mom. All you'd see is the smile. Very Betty. Betty would pay retail.

Bless her heart, Skip's mom had a stroke before passing away, so - with the open casket - the Revlon Cherries in the Snow lipstick looked just awful - resembling a bad Joker parody from Batman.

At the visitation, my mom said, if you can't get a proper make up artist or, if I have a stroke - no open casket. Pinky promise!

Rinaldo,
We never had fondue until the mid '70s. I actually bought the same avocado green fondue set set from that era on ebay. I think it was an S&H Green Stamps purchase. We retired the blue fork (dad's). The fella didn't get the thrill I did from using it as I did. Finally, a use for the Lazy Susan we kept on our kitchen table - early American was such the style in Lexington in the early '60s.

Tuna casserole - with noodles or with pimentos and potato chip crust? We were potato chip crust family - the fella is a Cream of Mushroom and noodles fan. with peas ... I see problems ahead.

goobaletta,
My, that was heinous shrimp-colored polyester! No one in their right mind would have that in their homes! But, she nevah paid retail.

Thanks for the connections! I love this thread and Graydon for establishing it! What's up for Thursday? I'm leaning toward great Jewish foods (maybe Don is... Maybe he isn't) or what Betty doesn't eat!

How fun!

Cheers!

#24

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Posted Sep 10, 2007 @ 11:37 PM

I know it's tempting to go off topic in here, but if you want to talk about things that aren't food or drink related, please take it to the Meet Market -- or the appropriate on-topic "Mad Men" thread.

#25

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Posted Sep 11, 2007 @ 8:33 AM

I think Fondue made a brief comeback in around 2001. Macy's and the like had lots of fondue pots for sale on big displays.

My husband has fond memories of fondue from growing up, so much so that our first christmas together while we were dating (2000), he actually searched out and bought a Le Creuset fondue pot for me. He was lucky I didn't ditch his ass after that. We've maybe used it 10 times. The cheese fondue in the packets are easy to do, just really fattening. Anyway, in the year after getting that fondue pot, I started seeing them EVERYWHERE. I think it's retreated back into nostalgia-land, though.

#26

tardigrade

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Posted Sep 11, 2007 @ 2:13 PM

Green Stamps! For the benefit of you young whippersnappers: once upon a time, grocery stores used to offer Green Stamps as a premium for shoppers. For every dollar you spent, you got some amount of stamps. You would save these in special booklets, and when you had enough, you could take the booklets to the Green Stamp Redemption Center and exchange them for Valuable Merchandise (T). There were other brands of stamps as well: my college roommates and I used to collect Kroger(I think) Plaid Stamps. Unfortunately, they discontinued the program before we had enough to do anything with them: we were saving up for a motorboat* and only needed 14,999.5 more books.

*it was the most expensive and impractical thing we could find. You could definitely get a fondue set for a lot less.

ETA: Well, it's sort of food related, since you got them in food stores!

Edited by tardigrade, Sep 11, 2007 @ 2:14 PM.


#27

Decormaven

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Posted Sep 11, 2007 @ 5:35 PM

And don't forget S&H Stamps, and Gold Stamps as well. We had a special drawer in the DM house just for stamps and coupon books. I've licked many a stamp!
Topic? I've dug out an old Woman's Day from 1960; here's a tasty recipe for Salmon Salad Loaf. This definitely should be included in the Gallery of Regrettable Food; it's in a Wrigley's gum ad, for some damn reason:
Hollow out bread loaf, leaving 1" shell; brush with butter and toast in 350 degree oven for 10 minutes. Drain & flake a 1 lb. can of red salmon; sprinkle with 1 tbs lemon juice. Add 1.5 cups cooked, chilled rice; 1/4 cup French dressing; 1/2 cup mayonnaise; 1/4 cup stuffed olives; 1 cup green seedless grapes; 2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped; 1/4 cup chopped radish; 2 tbs chopped onion. Toss together & chill. Pack solidly into loaf and serve.

#28

unclewiggly

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Posted Sep 12, 2007 @ 8:27 PM

And don't forget S&H Stamps, and Gold Stamps as well. We had a special drawer in the DM house just for stamps and coupon books. I've licked many a stamp!


My mother's grocery store (Foodtown in NJ) still gives out S&H Stamps -- she got her latest set of dishware with hers, I believe.

#29

Auntie M

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Posted Sep 14, 2007 @ 8:13 PM

it's in a Wrigley's gum ad, for some damn reason


Presumably because you'd need to chew a piece to get the taste of the salmon loaf out of your mouth.

Here's a little tasty fruit cup from the Appetizers section of my BH&G tome:

Pineapple-Mint Cup (intriguing, isn't it, you're already thinking about using up that fresh mint . . . but read on)
1 can pineapple chunks
1 cup halved and seeded Tokay grapes
1/2 cup white cream mints, broken
Ginger ale, chilled

Drain pineapple, combine with grapes and mints. Chill. Spoon into sherbets, pour ginger ale over. Makes 8 appetizer servings.

Tasty and refreshing!

#30

Bitchy McSnappy

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Posted Sep 17, 2007 @ 8:18 PM

Auntie M!
Talk about intrigued! If you can't find tokay grapes... what's a good substitute? We have muscadines (thick skins, woodsy-sweet). Where my dad's people were from - Berryville, VA, just outside of DC - half the town was named Levi, the other half was named Levelle (my mom said that was kind of scary, the names were just too close, the town had some blue people there - another story for another day).

Half the town was Jewish, the other half were Methodists. The joke was, everyone enjoyed Mogan David frozen pops in summer. Muscadines were big there - except when it was apple festival time. Sorry, I digressed.

My favorite things from growing up were Swanky Eats (the Boss is coming over!). Break out the Green Goddess salad dressing and the Grasshopper Pie! None of that everyday food (in our home, food that didn't need a knife)! One neighbor did theme dinners (everything's pink! - which my dad refused to eat - or the foreign foods - my mom still calls pizza, "pizza pie," and the refrigerator is still the "ice box" to her).

Mad Men makes me want to fix Swanky eats - and have "smart cocktails" and intriguing nibbles. Anyone up for some Welsh Rarebit?

By the way, does anyone really like or fix Beef Wellington? Maybe I've had bad versions. Just seems like the meat turns out gray and flabby.

Oh, speaking of Swanky, one neighbor served sweet breads - too swanky for Bill & Mildred. My dad never went back to their home (they had cats that roamed the counters, he couldn't deal with the brains/thymus or the cats). Those neighbors worked for IMB, so they moved soon after - much to my parents' relief.