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Peggy Olson: Blinding us with Earnestness


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#1141

Hecate7

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Posted Jul 2, 2013 @ 10:32 PM

I don't see why they bothered giving us a scene that neither built character for Peggy, showed us anything new about Abe and their relationship, nor shed any light on the sixties culture or world they're living in.

 

What was the point of Abe even being in that scene? For that matter, why did we even have to see it? Surely they could have gotten Abe and Peggy into that awful apartment without all the non-conversation that preceded the later, more significant scenes. I guess I have to conclude that Madmen is getting very random and boring.


Edited by Hecate7, Jul 2, 2013 @ 10:45 PM.

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#1142

Sister Magpie

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Posted Jul 2, 2013 @ 10:43 PM

 

So, really, showing us the first apartment was utterly unnecessary and a complete waste of time. I don't care about an apartment Peggy didn't get, unless her not getting it shows us something about her relationship with Abe, or her character, or society at that time, or all three. It appears it did none of the above.

 

 

 

Iirc, in the context of the episode it was showing an effect of MLK's asssassination (for rich white people it meant a potential good deal on an apartment but things went back to normal quickly) and the Noah's Ark idea of people wanting to pair off two by two with Peggy and Abe coming together over the idea of an apartment they'd talked about.

 

And of course it also set up Peggy's terrible living situation for the rest of the season that eventually led to her breakup with Abe. That part said a lot about their relationship and Abe. They could have just had Peggy announcing she and Abe were buying a building, but I think it made sense to show that of course Peggy would have, on her own, gone for the UES pad. The building was sort of Peggy and Abe's last--and misguided--stab at putting their relationship to the test. Peggy's now at the agency Ted wanted and the apartment Abe wanted.


Edited by Sister Magpie, Jul 2, 2013 @ 10:43 PM.

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#1143

Hecate7

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Posted Jul 2, 2013 @ 10:47 PM

Last stab. Love it. :)

 

And I do think it's interesting that although Peggy does try to do things on her own, she has in fact ended up not where she wanted to be, but where men in her life wanted her to be.


Edited by Hecate7, Jul 2, 2013 @ 10:48 PM.

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#1144

Cherith

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Posted Jul 2, 2013 @ 10:54 PM

Peggy's now at the agency Ted wanted and the apartment Abe wanted.

 

Very true. Yet, despite this Peggy is now copy chief at a much bigger and more prestigious firm than she was at the start of the season. And despite getting a building she didn't really want she is sitting on property that will make her a millionaire if she keeps it, as it seems she will (although I think she should rent it out more so than she already does gay couples and college kids flocked to the area around this time because of how accessible it was but cheap).

 

I do think there is an "inherit the earth" underpinning to all of it. Like last season when it seemed to be a pretty dark and pessimistic mood in the office but by the end money is just rolling in the door and they are better off than they have ever been?

 

Both Abe and Ted were the wrong guys and Peggy really went through hell in her own way for both of them. She has been jerked around and she feels like she has no agency. Yes, in both cases she actually made decisions, big ones, but I get why she feel like she didn't get that. Or that, in the end, her decisions didn't matter.  But those were experiences she had to have, I think. Part of the learning curve. At the end she is in Don's office like a boss, figuratively and literally, and going home to a brownstone that is appreciating in value every day. I think part of the overall point is she did come out OK and she will probably always come out OK. Because her story has always been part luck part perseverance part getting shit all over. SHe was dragged out of the secretary pool, she didn't ask, but once out she hung on for dear life and worked like crazy. She was dragged from the safe comfort of CGC to SC&P but she is working hard and professionally has a great resume piece. She was dragged to the UWS  but she isn't a quitter and she has put a lot of work into the place (it looks great) and it will work out well for her. I think that is just Peggy's story.

 

But people DID put morality over profits, especially in that business. I know it's hard to believe, but they did. And the Realtor assumed Abe was Peggy's husband, because that was the norm, until he went out of the way to explain that he wasn't. If it was Peggy's idea for Abe to show up, then this is a case of Peggy shooting herself in the foot. I didn't remember her asking him, but maybe she did.

 

Peggy mentioned that she had asked Abe to come after the realtor told her they didn't get it. She had said she had wanted him to go because it would be his home too. And that led to her asking where he would want to live and him mentioning the photographer he knew on the UWS.


Edited by Cherith, Jul 3, 2013 @ 10:30 AM.

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#1145

caitmcg

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Posted Jul 3, 2013 @ 2:43 AM

Posted here in error.

Edited by caitmcg, Jul 3, 2013 @ 2:50 AM.

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#1146

Birdhee

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Posted Jul 6, 2013 @ 6:07 PM

I really missed Myra Turley as Peggy's mother this past season. She had several episodes in season two, and she has had one apiece in all the subsequent seasons, but was MIA in season six. Peggy's family scenes are some of the best-observed in the series, in my opinion -- I feel I know those people, Catholics of a very specific time, place, and social standing, during an era when the church was changing. Elisabeth Moss is always great, but never more so than when Peggy is interacting with her mother and sister, and Turley is a wonderful scene partner for her. I love the way she says "youse" for "you," and calls her daughter "Peaches," and even when she is being stern, she seems loving and devoted underneath it. Even in the "You're going to get raped" scene, I felt a lot of that was about her own hurt and loneliness, and it was very emotionally authentic.  


Edited by Birdhee, Jul 6, 2013 @ 6:09 PM.

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#1147

Jenn

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Posted Jul 24, 2013 @ 12:55 PM

I really like Peggy's family too.  The scene where Peggy and Abe announced that they were moving in together was great, and Peggy's conversation with her mother immediately afterwards was brilliant.  I think the family scenes can sort of 'ground' the characters (Roger with his daughter, Joan with her mother) - and Peggy missed that this season, I think.

 

 

She was dragged from the safe comfort of CGC

 

I don't know.  We saw in the later half of the season that Ted had become uncritical of Peggy's work, and was also risking her reputation in the office (although Peggy was joining in).  Neither of those things would have been good for Peggy in the long run - and who is to say that a guilty Ted without a golden ticket to California wouldn't have resorted to shunting Peggy off to another agency?  It's easy to imagine Peggy's work dropping in quality, and her position as Copy Chief ascribed to the fact that she was having a fling with the boss.

 

I feel that CGC turned into a chance for a do-over for Peggy - the way she'd have liked her career to have gone from the outset.  The boss was interested in her advances, he did think her work was all great.  She had a harder path at Sterling Cooper - but that was what made her tougher and helped her earn respect. 

 

Have to admit, I found it tough to like Peggy much this season. 


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#1148

Constantinople

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Posted Nov 20, 2013 @ 4:24 PM

I can't decide whether Peggy will order duck for lunch this Friday, as a way to remember the old times, or not.


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#1149

Zolagirl50

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Posted Feb 2, 2014 @ 12:25 PM

We've had to deal with Don's mommy issues for 6 seasons, but it's funny that we've never heard Peggy really talk about the loss of her father at all.  And when I say funny I mean, it's a big part of her that could be explored.  I guess it is explored more obliquely by her constantly falling for  men who have a more patriarchal power over her, Duck, Pete, Ted - but it's still a shame that her loss of a parent at a young age hasn't been explored to any degree that we've had with Don and his mother and father. 

 

And at this point, hasn't Peggy pretty much out-Joaned Joan with the number of men she's slept with at that office?  Not that it's a bad thing, but everyone makes Joan out to be the one who they all lust after, but...Peggy's slept with three solid, high profile dudes in that office.  Joan with 1 high profile guy, Roger, and one wayyyy less high profile, Paul Kinsey.


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#1150

PassTheSalt

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 10:02 AM

Oh, Peggy. I'm so glad to see her back, but I'm troubled to see her in such a bad place. I did feel terrible for her at the end as she broke down, and understand her situation -- everyone that she leaned on previously has, based on their own choices, left her in a frustrating and lonely situation. Abe was the one that wanted the UWS apartment (Peggy of course went along with it and ultimately spent her money on it, but he was the driving force behind that situation). Peggy took a step out on her own professionally, but the merger brought her back unwillingly into her previous office environment. Don's breakdown and subsequent firing left her under a very different boss who does not share her approach and passion for copy like his predecesors. And of course Ted, who had to go clear across the country to get away from her leaves her with a personal and professional hole. And the one friend that she does have that she could lean on -- Stan -- she is pushing away in her overall frustration. So she is alone in every sense of the word. I do feel for her.

 

All of that said, I did think that much of her behavior in the premiere was, for lack of a better word, bratty. Lou Avery is a total zero to me, a lousy creative director, and is frankly a dick. He seemed condescending to Dawn and everyone, for that matter, and definitely gives off the vibe that he is a total hack who is phoning it in. But, he is her boss, and Peggy is creeping up to the line of insubordination. I'm sure we've all had shitty bosses, and have all dreamed of telling them to go pound sand, but we needed the job so we just kept going. I know it is frustrating for her, but she could have approached all of her pitches to Avery in a better way. Also, I thought she acted borderline certifiable in the kitchen scene with Ted. The "running-into-an-ex" situation is the pits, but she was just a jittery mess.  Did she think she would never see him again?  Surely she would know that he will be around sometimes.  I would have thought she could have handled that with a little more poise, and not needed Stan to come run interference for her. Ted seemed rattled, almost like he wished the ground would open up and swallow him, but he didn't seem nearly the mess that Peggy did.  That was realistic (it was his choice, after all), but still disappointing. 

 

I'm hoping this is Peggy's bottom, and that she can have a "Summer Man" type awakening and find herself.  Maybe if she reaches out to Freddy (like the last time she was unsatisfied at work), she will get back in touch with Don.  A Draper-Olson agency?


Edited by PassTheSalt, Apr 14, 2014 @ 10:03 AM.

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#1151

Rai

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 10:41 AM

If they could stop reading my diary and mining it for Peggy's story...

 

I've always uncomfortably identified with Peggy the most, both in terms of being a woman in a male-dominated industry, and the very real personality flaws that she has, which work against her just as much as her gender does (no babies though, secret or otherwise).  But last night's episode just really got real on me more than the rest.  I've been in the situation of thinking I could work with a new boss the way I did previous ones, and it's really been problematic for me in the last couple of years.  And man, I too can't let things go and have trouble cutting my losses.  Girl, I feel you. 

 

But she should hire a super for the apartments.  Delegate!


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#1152

lulusghost

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 1:23 PM

I've often wondered if Peggy doesn't have a mild form of what we call Asperger's Syndrome today, or some other psychological malady where she doesn't pick up on social cues. This was glaringly evident in 7-1 when she kept badgering the new boss (who is a real jerk, IMO) about the ad line, but I've seen it come up again and again through the years. I really like Peggy and want her to succeed. The only person who really consistently supported her (and didn't want to sleep with her) was Don. I'm hoping that relationship gets back on track, and that they possibly start their own agency.


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#1153

Sister Magpie

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 1:58 PM

Peggy doesn't come across to me as anything other than neurotypical. She picks up social cues plenty of times. In this case she was angry and there were more important things, she thought, than hot the guy wanted her to act. 


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#1154

Bawoman

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 6:07 PM

Peggy has never learned to be pushy without appearing as such. She is the exact opposite of those people who get things they didn't even have to explicitly ask for. She could take a cue from Joan in that regard. Pegs has alot of drive, but she needs to learn how to disguise it sometimes, because people who smell "desperate" tend to recoil.


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#1155

Jenn

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 6:31 PM

She's also got a tendency to dig her heels in to the point of self-destructiveness when she feels aggrieved. 

 

Also, I thought she acted borderline certifiable in the kitchen scene with Ted. The "running-into-an-ex" situation is the pits, but she was just a jittery mess.

 

I thought that - but then someone pointed out that it's only 7 weeks down the line.  It's still slightly annoying, but more forgiveable.

 

I think this is maybe the first time that Peggy has found work unsatisfying, instead of just frustrating.  Working with a boss who doesn't care if the work is mediocre, and who doesn't give a damn for your opinion, isn't going to work for Peggy - who gets so much from her job. 


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#1156

Bawoman

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Posted Apr 14, 2014 @ 6:52 PM

I loved the Ted/Peggy/Stan scene, but wouldn't it just have been easier for everyone if Peggy had simply left when she saw Ted, maybe with an excuse that she had forgotten something? I know that's what I've done in the past to avoid akward encounters.


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