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Mystery Mad Man Don Draper: Sleeps on a Bed of Money


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#1081

Wiendish Fitch

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Posted May 18, 2012 @ 3:58 PM

One thing I think Weiner proved with Roger/Jane is that he sees how marrying young can age you. Both Roger and Don married younger women in part because the woman's youth made him feel younger (for Roger this was a huge part). But almost immediately when Roger was in a scene with both Jane and Margaret he became a guy managing two daughters instead of a guy handling his daughter with his stepmother. He had to talk to Mona or Joan to connect on the same level (even though Joan is also younger than he is).


Taking this to the Don and Megan thread.
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#1082

rogaine2233

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Posted May 21, 2012 @ 1:36 PM

Sexy!Don is back! How hot was it when he was driving the HELL out of that Jag? Better than the kitchen sink at the Campbell's house, by far! And the scenes in the bar with Joan. He looked young and dashing again instead of old and tired as he does in every scene with Megan.

Not sure she meant to do it on purpose, but Megan gave Don the boot in the ass he needed by reminding him that that he loved advertising before he ever loved her. It reminded of the time in California after being AWOL for weeks, when Anna reminded Don that he still loved Betty and he went home and back to her.

After last night's episode, I wonder if Joan is going to become Don's new "Anna".
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#1083

mickbeth

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Posted May 21, 2012 @ 11:40 PM

After last night's episode, I wonder if Joan is going to become Don's new "Anna".


I can't see that. Anna had her paralysis to make her more down to earth. Humble. Has anyone ever heard Joan say anything that was in the least self-effacing? Loving? The closest she got to serving anything but her own ego or self-interest was when she wiped Desitin on her son's butt. If Don were to show any need or vulnerability to her, there'd be nothing but a voluptuous hole left in the air in front of him.
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#1084

rogaine2233

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Posted May 22, 2012 @ 5:05 PM

I meant that Anna somehow grounded Don, but I can see your point that Joan is made of different stuff.

Re: Don's creative drive. I think he has to be unhappy and unfulfilled in his personal life for his creative juices to start flowing. And when he's unhappy, he starts to compartmentalize ( or vice versa). He's doing it again. He had Joan for scintillating conversation. He made love to that car. And then he got home to " the ball and chain" who plopped his dinner down before him.

Edited by rogaine2233, May 22, 2012 @ 5:06 PM.

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#1085

Jenn

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Posted May 22, 2012 @ 6:11 PM

Has anyone ever heard Joan say anything that was in the least self-effacing?


When she told Peggy that 'of course' she had been dumped? Or admitted that her marriage was a general disaster, in the episode?
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#1086

rogaine2233

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Posted May 23, 2012 @ 5:33 PM

What's going on with Don?

Something in the conversation with Joan alerted him to the fact that something is missing from his relationship with Megan. Joan commented during their cryptic conversation, 'he is who he is'. That's pretty much in complete opposition to what Megan offers him 'I care about who you are now'. One is about acceptance of how someone is and the likelihood that they'll continue to be that way, the other offers the idea of change and a fresh start.

The type of bar they were in, the bits of history they shared, their knowledge of each other, the music on the jukebox, the way they flirted - it was familiar to them, and harked back to a past where they were both more comfortable. Megan offers a modernity that Don doesn't really like or particularly want to engage with: the play about advertising, her friends, her dance routine for him, the half-baked observations on consumerism.


One of the articles linked here today went into this a bit as well. Don was dating Faye when he started to boink Megan. Faye offered him love and acceptance but it came with the price of completing the difficult work he had started to do on himself in S4. He was getting close to some pretty ugly truths and when Megan came along, offering youth, sweetness and light and just outright acceptance of who he is now with no pressure to do any hard work, Don took the easy way out.

But now the chickens are coming home to roost. He bought the product based on the pretty packaging but it's not living up to its advertised claims. Don is a master of denial and he doesn't want this marriage to fail (because that's a statement about DON, in his mind...again it's all about him), so he's buried his growing doubt deep down, where he stores all the other lies and denials he's lived with for his entire life.

Something about that conversation in the bar with Joan just opened up a pathway to let it out. The question is, will it stay out or will he shove it all deep down again? He's going to throw himself into work, so he has the opportunity to distract himself again. But his long hours and time apart from Megan might only amplify what's really going on.

Should be interesting to see if the writers break them up this season or let them limp along for all or part of next season. I can't believe Don/Megan is going to be the main cliffhanger again. They've got to come up with something else.
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#1087

WaltzinSpringTm

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Posted May 23, 2012 @ 6:31 PM

I just think Don didn't focus much on what new beginnings really meant, in specificity. His idea of marriage, based on the season premiere and follow up, was like fan fiction. Everything surrounding the relationship was hazy and vague, and the relationship itself was cloaked in Disney-fied sunshine, adult division. It was a very old-fashioned view of new beginnings, actually. An adoring, youngish, yet old-fashioned girl (old fashioned sort of job, old fashioned talents (Maria von Trapp), totally supportive. Throw a little Whiskey-a-Go-Go in there to spice it up. Complete unreality. When Megan 'worked' at SCDP, it was playing at working, as Don didn't take it seriously, and when she cooked up that amazing Heinz pitch (my eyeroll here) it came upon her by magic.

I don't see Don in pain or burdened by his past so much as really, really immature. He gets fretful anytime real stuff comes up, specific stuff. Meantime, Peggy, for instance, is drowning in specific stuff, navigating real things. I loved Don looking at all of Ginsberg's work. "Whaaa - I guess Peggy was really buried by Heinz huh." Yeah. Do the math Don.

Edited by WaltzinSpringTm, May 23, 2012 @ 6:32 PM.

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#1088

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Posted May 24, 2012 @ 6:03 PM

But now the chickens are coming home to roost. He bought the product based on the pretty packaging but it's not living up to its advertised claims.


I think there's parallels to be drawn between Joan and Don's marriages, in that they both went for an ideal at a particularly rocky patch in their lives.

Don's primary storyline in s4 (apart from his brief foray into self-examination) was his downward spiral. He was starting to look a little healthier during his swimming and journaling phase. Then he had the big panic over his identity theft being found out, started drinking again, and decided he was in love with Megan. A fresh start with a beautiful young woman who didn't care about his past, and would instantly fill the 'wife and mother to his children' vacancy. Now he's actually scratching beneath the surface, though, it's not all as he wanted.

Joan's relationship with Greg came after a rocky patch. Paul's prank with the driving license had reminded her of her age. Roger's behaviour after the heart-attack had left her hurt. But here's the handsome young doctor she'd always been aiming for! Except he has massive problems. Joan was willing to work at it, though - and I'm not sure if Don is willing to do that.
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#1089

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Posted May 28, 2012 @ 5:14 PM

I wonder if the main reason Don didn't want Joan to prostitute herself was because his ego was at stake. In the past when Don fired Sal or when he slept with Bobbie to close the deal, Don was extremely confident of his abilities and worth. Now ,he's just getting out of his love haze with Megan and focusing on the job finding it's not coming as easy as it used to. Don needed the win with Jaguar for himself. His self-esteem needed to know that he and his team got them the account. Joan sleeping with the client takes the victory away from Don. I do think Don cares about Joan, but I think his need for her not to do what the others wanted was motivated by wanting to be able to take credit for getting the job done.
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#1090

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Posted May 28, 2012 @ 7:59 PM

To be fair, the first time he slept with Bobbie it wasn't to close a deal. Or rather, it WAS, but only because she forced herself on him while they were trapped in a car during a hail storm.

If anything, Don knows how terrible sexual coercion is as it relates to business and that's why he was so against Joan doing it. Obviously he was fine with Sal doing it, but I think in Don's eyes (and many people of the time) because homosexuality was a personality disorder and something akin to an absolute sex fiend. Not that that point of view isn't disgusting, but it's consistent with the times and character.
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#1091

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Posted May 31, 2012 @ 12:36 PM

I have a theory about Don and why he is where he is and where he might be going. Of course, I don't write the show, but so I'm probably way off base, but here goes.

We all know Don was miserable for a lot of reasons while married to Betty, and most of them had nothing to do with Betty, though she suffered the consequences. Still, Don had little to no awareness of his psyche, so when Betty finally played her hand, it threw him. Control is important to someone who grew up the way he did and he lost control of the marriage and of Betty.

Some all saw what happened in S4. Don went off the rails and was sinking fast. I think Faye had a hand in stopping that slide along with his decision to journal and take a closer look at himself. Don had enough self preservation instincts to know something had to change. I'm not sure he really understood that the something was him.

But Faye was good for him and she did push him to do some of the hard work he needed to do. And I think he just npmight have done it but.....

Then Anna died. And Don's one deep connection, someone important to him was no longer there. Trigger the abandonment issues.

Don went off the rails again.

And FWIW, I think he's still off the rails. He takes Megan to California, concocts a fantasy of happily ever after based on an illusion and marries her. He has been chasing that illusion all season.

As reality starts to hit, I notice Don is drinking and smoking more. So he might be trying to change as he relates to a woman in marriage, but he's again overindulging in harmful escape methods.

I don't know where this will lead. Obviously, it's not going to be resolved this season because then there wouldn't be a show. But his journey is really still ongoing and I see some very rough road ahead.
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#1092

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Posted May 31, 2012 @ 5:07 PM

But of course! After all, there are still two season and 2 episodes left. ;)
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#1093

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Posted May 31, 2012 @ 7:17 PM

I wish we could see scenes of Don's early days at the agency, since we know he BS'ed the hell out of Roger to get in there. (Hell, Roger couldn't even remember hiring him!) Young Don Draper, in all his tapdancing glory, lol.
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#1094

Riff Randell

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Posted May 31, 2012 @ 9:06 PM

I wonder if the main reason Don didn't want Joan to prostitute herself was because his ego was at stake.

I felt this, too. Realizing what she'd done soured "his" victory in more than one way.

Now that Peggy's no longer around to alternately be his punching bag and shoulder to cry on, he's going to be a mess at work. Ginsberg certainly won't tolerate that same sort of abuse, and as he's extremely talented as well as used to being fired, he has nothing to lose - but Don does. Without Peggy there to pick up all the extra slack, Don needs Ginsberg. (Notice that it was Ginsberg's pitch that was used for Jaguar?) He might have temporarily scared him with that "I don't think about you at all" lie, but Ginsberg's got three advantages Peggy didn't - he's male, he never shuts up, and he isn't tied down by the belief that he owes his waking moments to Don. Can't wait to see the conflict between them play out in the final episodes.

All of the negligence to SCDP from Don's Zou Bisou leave has finally started to boil - I think we're meant to presume that Lane's money troubles will destroy SCDP, but really, employee discontent will be the true death knell. Peggy quitting was certainly earth-shattering for Don, but that will be just the first of the repercussions of his actions. Ken's not happy, and Stan won't be, either. Ginsberg's going to throw his weight more and more. He doesn't respect the enigma of Don that he envisioned when first hired - if anything, he's learned that Don is jealous, spiteful dinosaur who throws away campaigns that threaten the notion of his own genius, who blithely pitches a mediocre campaign and looks around expectantly for praise.

Peg, Stan and Ginsberg's faces when Don first revealed his Devil Sno-Ball pitch were like cautious kids who don't want to tell Dad how silly he looks in that brand new sportscar he bought to ease his mid-life crisis. He mistook that thirty-year-old song for the Beatles. He fell asleep during a Jaguar session, then was whisked away by his second wife who's almost half his age. Despite Megan's Heinz idea winning back the account, Ginsberg and Stan were furious when Don told them to re-work everything - and they were less than pleased when he told them to forget worrying about Chevalier Blanc's music, their input doesn't matter, because Megan will do it. They won't forget any of this.

Remember the line that Don acidly threw at Roger, regarding his marriage to Jane? "Nobody thinks you're happy. They think you're foolish."

Pot calling kettle, Don.
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#1095

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Posted Jun 1, 2012 @ 11:36 AM

It's interesting that Bert has been proven right about Don not being able to stomach the realities of the business. I'm curious if Joan's actions will further alienate him from the partners or if he will finally realize what business is and join them. Some of my favorite moments in the show are when Bert has to awaken Don to the cold hard reality of business.
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#1096

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Posted Jun 1, 2012 @ 3:41 PM

All of the negligence to SCDP from Don's Zou Bisou leave has finally started to boil - I think we're meant to presume that Lane's money troubles will destroy SCDP, but really, employee discontent will be the true death knell. Peggy quitting was certainly earth-shattering for Don, but that will be just the first of the repercussions of his actions. Ken's not happy, and Stan won't be, either. Ginsberg's going to throw his weight more and more.


I definitely think the 'every man for himself' thing MW mentioned can be seen at pla in Don's storyline. He neglected just about everything to focus on his new wife - and the problems you mention above are the consequences.

It's interesting to contrast Don's work situation at the end of season 3 (Shut the Door, Have a Seat), with the situation he finds himself in now. They may have been operating out of one hotel room when SCDP was born, but when Don looked around the room he saw a surrogate family to comfort him after the breakdown of his marriage. He's taken that entirely for granted this season, and now we've got to the point where things seem to be disintegrating, and selfishness and miscommunication are abounding.
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#1097

coffeeloverfrea

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Posted Jun 5, 2012 @ 9:05 PM

So, Don seems to be crawling out of his "love leave" stupor and trying to recapture the old Don Draper MoJo -- last week with his Jaguar speech and this week with his Dow Chemical stint. I have to wonder, though, how afraid he is that he hasn't "got it" anymore. After all, the Jaguar account was won by one of Ginsberg's ideas, and the Dow Chemical meeting was more desperation tactic than vintage Draper.

And poor Don, racked with guilt over not one but now two people close to him who hanged themselves after interactions with him. Don never dealt with Adam's death, not properly. And so Lane's death has to come as a shocker to him. You could just see all the wind go out of his sails when they found Lane's body. Don started over many times, as he told Lane, but he never alluded to how much it cost him each time to do so.

The tragic irony is that in this case, Don was right. Lane was embezzling from the firm; as a partner and CFO, he couldn't be trusted anymore. Don had no choice, and was actually very decent to Lane, in offering to cover the money he stole and to sweep everything under the rug if Lane went quietly. He could have been much harsher -- Cooper sure would have been. He shouldn't feel guilty about Lane; it wasn't on him. But he will, because of Adam, and because of who he is.
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#1098

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Posted Jun 5, 2012 @ 10:34 PM

Not sure she meant to do it on purpose, but Megan gave Don the boot in the ass he needed by reminding him that that he loved advertising before he ever loved her.


And now he has TWO loves in his life, advertising and Megan! :) Lucky guy, that Don.
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#1099

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Posted Jun 6, 2012 @ 10:03 AM

Old observation: In the scene where Peggy is pulling Don aside she can offer her resignation, Jon Hamm does this thing with his face where it looks like he's chewing. It was a look of barely disguised disgust. It was such a small movement and such a quick effect, but it really hit me hard, because I had an ex that used to do the same thing when he was pissed. It's those little moments that I wish were in Emmy reels...not the forehead-vein-popping exercises...
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#1100

neonlite

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Posted Jun 6, 2012 @ 11:24 AM

How does he get those veins to Pop? Wouldn't it be dangerous?
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#1101

WaltzinSpringTm

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Posted Jun 8, 2012 @ 4:15 PM

I want to know where he gets his money. He doesn't come from money; he's it. I kind of feel that Henry telling Betty that he didn't want her taking money from Don, that he would take care of her AND the children was a ridiculous expedient to cut down on Don's expenses and have him continue as a rich man even as the new agency struggled. He may have gotten a windfall but if he is supposed to be, say, paying for Sally and Bobby's (private) schooling, he paid out a ton of money for Pete's share of the agency when the partners needed to pitch in, and as he himself has said the clientele the agency has been taking on is kind of small change. Yet we're never meant to question his financial health. I do. He's only forty. He hasn't been partner long enough to have set-for-life money or to have no impact on lifestyle during the more struggling times of his business.

Edited by WaltzinSpringTm, Jun 8, 2012 @ 4:16 PM.

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#1102

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Posted Jun 8, 2012 @ 5:23 PM

I kind of feel that Henry telling Betty that he didn't want her taking money from Don, that he would take care of her AND the children was a ridiculous expedient to cut down on Don's expenses and have him continue as a rich man even as the new agency struggled.


I've always seen this as just another example of how Don never has to face any real repercussions for his actions. Every time it looks like Don is going to have to pay for something he's done, somehow he gets out of it. Anna immediately forgives him, Bert doesn't care about his past, Betty lies to the government for him, his spontaneous marriage to Megan turns out to be great, etc. Meanwhile, other characters have to deal with the fallout.
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#1103

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Posted Jun 8, 2012 @ 7:07 PM

Don't forget the incredibly insulting, to my mind, fake-out when Don tried to "save" Joan. Joan is a grown woman. Bad enough that, with her question about Mr. Sterling, we're almost led to infer if Roger had declared he'd never let this happen, she wouldn't have done it. But Don being 'too late' sort of suggests that her prostituting herself or not depends on his godlike opinion. She thinks he's on board, so she trudges on over to Mr. J. Hut's. But if Don had gotten there in time, HE might have prevented her. He alone could have convinced this incredibly experienced woman that her financial troubles and her future weren't worth what she was about to do. She was unable to get there on her own.
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#1104

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Posted Jun 10, 2012 @ 12:05 PM

I kind of feel that Henry telling Betty that he didn't want her taking money from Don, that he would take care of her AND the children was a ridiculous expedient to cut down on Don's expenses and have him continue as a rich man even as the new agency struggled.


Now that's an interesting thought (and I also wonder where Henry's money comes from and how he's able to support a new wife with three children of her own in the manner in which he's doing it; I'd like to know more about Henry in general). I agree that Don spends very, very freely as far as we can tell. I would hope that he contributes to the financial support of his children but how much? I seem to recall him being a little tight-fisted when he was married to Betty--wasn't that why he rejected the idea of air conditioning or was he just unreasonably pissed Betty let a salesman into the house? I definitely remember him failing the test Betty gave him when she asked for money, knowing about his secret stash, and he refused even though the amount she had in the checking account was relatively small. Betty had nice clothes but I don't really remember any evidence that she spent excessively or selfishly on anything.
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#1105

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Posted Jun 10, 2012 @ 12:17 PM

I think Don was ok with spending money when he saw the PR benefit for him. Nice clothes for Betty so she looked good on his arm, etc. betty's "at home" clothes were nothing special. The house was not decorated lavishly and he didn't see the usefulness of air conditioning. He was happy to have indoor plumbing!

He appears to be different with Megan. The apartment and furnishings, as well as Megan's clothes are all very expensive.
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#1106

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Posted Jun 10, 2012 @ 1:42 PM

I kind of feel that Henry telling Betty that he didn't want her taking money from Don, that he would take care of her AND the children was a ridiculous expedient to cut down on Don's expenses and have him continue as a rich man even as the new agency struggled.


On top of that, she has her own money from her father's estate. Her brother tried to buy her out of the house (for what her Dad paid in the 1930s, ha) but she clearly insisted on selling and splitting the profit. That isn't enough to live on, alone, but probably is a nice little egg for her.

I agree that it is an example of Don mostly avoiding consequences of his actions. Yes, he had to get a divorce. A divorce from someone he didn't want to divorce but whom he had always cheated on both physically and emotionally. And it is the emotional stuff that really put the distance in his marriage. So, I don't think in the long run he sees that divorce as bad.

I think Don was ok with spending money when he saw the PR benefit for him. Nice clothes for Betty so she looked good on his arm, etc. betty's "at home" clothes were nothing special. The house was not decorated lavishly and he didn't see the usefulness of air conditioning. He was happy to have indoor plumbing!


I think, really, Don was always pennywise and pound foolish. With his constant "I'm not Mr. Edison" comments to Sally. But when he got his big bonus from Bert he was going to spend it all on a trip to Paris with Midge. We would see him spend in the city. As Betty said, he didn't really seem to understand how to have money.

I also think that now Don isn't actually actively squirling money away for when his Dick Whitman deception is uncovered. At least, less so. I think he feels more comfortable in his lies now than he once did. He keeps telling people and the world keeps not ending.

He may have gotten a windfall but if he is supposed to be, say, paying for Sally and Bobby's (private) schooling, he paid out a ton of money for Pete's share of the agency when the partners needed to pitch in, and as he himself has said the clientele the agency has been taking on is kind of small change. Yet we're never meant to question his financial health. I do. He's only forty. He hasn't been partner long enough to have set-for-life money or to have no impact on lifestyle during the more struggling times of his business.


Yeah, I think about this but I think his being quite wealthy makes sense. Five Hundred Thousand Dollars (what he got from the SC buy out) is a lot of money at that time. That is something like $3.4 million today. And he was making huge numbers (for the time) at SC prior and after the buy out. He also sold their old house. Considering what the housing market was like he probably sold it at a profit. I am sure he still does pay some child support (regardless of Henry's wishes) but Henry still pays for most of the day to day upkeep of his children other than school (food and such). He had to put $150k into SCDP. Other than that SCDP hasn't been making them money but it hasn't really lost money either. It has been steady since the loss of Lucky Strike so he hasn't had to put more money into that. So even if he only had the 500k buy out of SC he would still be doing pretty well. But that isn't all he has because he did so very well prior to getting that buy out and had good bonuses (not to mention the money from the house). And Don didn't spend too lavishly prior to meeting Megan. I think the idea of him still being quite wealthy makes a lot of sense. That apartment is expensive but not 350 thousand dollars in 1966 money expensive.

Plus, I am sure Megan buys all of her own clothes. She worked up until very recently and I doubt she contributes much to the household so her money was to spend as she wished.

On top of all of that, this is all assuming his money is just sitting in a bank account somewhere. But we know from his talk with his accountant and from Don saying that his accountant has done a lot of good work for him that he actually has most of his money invested. So he is probably growing his money not letting it sit stagnant.

Edited by Cherith, Jun 10, 2012 @ 1:48 PM.

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#1107

WaltzinSpringTm

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Posted Jun 10, 2012 @ 3:29 PM

I'm not going to assume she buys her own clothes; some of her evening wear would have been a month's salary. Prior to Don she was supporting herself on a secretary's salary, and she was only a low ranked/paid copywriter for about eight months. Her wardrobe would have eaten that up a long time ago. There's also acting classes, headshots, etc.

While the SC buyout netted Don good money, he put in Pete's share at one point, which was substantial. He bought the apartment on Park. Betty and Henry lived in the Ossining place for awhile without Don's lifestyle being inhibited at all, before it was sold. Furthermore, he needs to be careful because he has no safety net. Richer men than he have ended up penurious when the money stopped coming in.
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#1108

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Posted Jun 10, 2012 @ 4:04 PM

Don't forget the house in California. He basically sold 2 houses in the span of about a year. I think he had some big chunks of money come in and hasn't had any significant losses. I think he got in a lot of money and thanks to his arrangement with Betty (totally unrealistic, IMO), he got to hold on to it. Sounds like he's getting good investment advice, too. Though it might be the opposite, and he might be spending like a drunken sailor with consequences to follow. It is kind of a fairytale situation where he seems to have unlimited money.

I don't know what to think about Megan...She always looked nicely turned out as a secretary, but I think it's just because she's stylish and I'm guessing she was someone who could dress well on a shoe-string. But she's way past that now. I bet Don likes spoiling her...maybe another way he's trying to be different from marriage #1.

Edited by BBDi, Jun 10, 2012 @ 4:11 PM.

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#1109

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Posted Jun 10, 2012 @ 4:20 PM

The PPL buyout netted Don $500,000, to be paid over the course of 10 years. In 1967 it's been about five years, so he's only received half of that, and has had to pay at least $150K into the business at the end of S4 (and I'm not certain that the $50K on behalf of Pete would be paid back to Don). I also find it hard to believe that the partners wouldn't have had to put in for start-up costs in 1963/4, so I'd guess that his investment costs into SCDP probably just about equal his payout so far from the sale of SC.

On the other hand, the sale of SC should be a continuing source of revenue for him until about 1972. (Roger, Bert, and Alice Cooper are still reaping the benefits of this to an even greater degree.) He also has been receiving a substantial salary for a long time, and not living extravagantly until Megan came along.

The equity from the Ossining house (eta: and Anna's!) probably helped with his Park Avenue apartment -- assuming he bought it? -- but it does seem like he is spending more freely this year. I think part of it is that he has mostly stopped thinking that he might flee at any time, so he isn't building that little nest egg so he can start over. But I do think the show isn't 100% "fair" about Don's finances, especially if Henry's pride really did get him off the child support hook.

Edited by lska, Jun 10, 2012 @ 4:21 PM.

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#1110

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Posted Jun 10, 2012 @ 5:29 PM

Betty and Henry lived in the Ossining place for awhile without Don's lifestyle being inhibited at all, before it was sold


Henry paid Don rent so he wasn't operating at a loss on the house. Or if he was it was minimal. (Around Gene's birthday Henry asked Don to get his stuff out of the garage because he needed to store his boat and said he could hire someone to do it and take the money out of the rent.)

While the SC buyout netted Don good money, he put in Pete's share at one point, which was substantial.


And as has been said 150k out of 500k isn't that much when you consider his formerly big salary (out of which we know he saved significant amounts to keep on hand in cash) and the sale of two homes. And it isn't as though the 150k is lost to him. It is equity in the business.

His finances seem about right to me. He had equity in two homes, he had a huge sell out that is still bringing in money, and he had previously had years of making a good living and spending relatively little. Not to mention we don't know what kind of interest he is getting on his investments.

And his Park Avenue apartment is also equity. Today thinking of property as a good investment is kind of absurd. But if Don wants to sell that apartment in twenty years he will make a killing. That is not a bad purchase, at all.

Edited by Cherith, Jun 10, 2012 @ 5:38 PM.

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