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#2581

Fungi Wisdom

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Posted Feb 11, 2012 @ 8:16 PM

It's right for a lot of people not to buy. But I don't think it makes an entertaining episode. What's next? Dog Whisperer episodes where the dog owners give the dog up? For Rent episodes where the potential renters decide to just stay with their parents?


Hilarious :-)
When it comes down to it though, I don't care if people buy. I'm in it because these shows are about snooping inside other people's houses (aka: look at real estate). Don't care about the PV's story or which house, if any, they choose.
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#2582

Mystery

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Posted Feb 22, 2012 @ 1:18 AM

Just saw the episode with the single mother in New Jersey. Another no-purchase episode. She wanted to buy a house that had an asking price of $249k. She decided it needed $80k work and offered $185k; she was willing to go to $200k but didn't accept the sellers' offer of $210k. I couldn't believe it. Egypt said that the mother was "doing her homework" by figuring out how much upgrades would cost. To me, that doesn't count as doing your homework. Doing your homework should be figuring out what the house is worth on the open market. I know a house is only worth what a buyer would pay, and I know you can't just assume a seller's asking price is that negotiable, but I was amazed that the seller even came back with a counteroffer. So I guess the mother knew the house was way overpriced. But assuming she wanted to stay in the same town for her daughter's school, I was very surprised she wouldn't come up the $10k. Someone who needs to stay in the same town is at a bit of a disadvantage, the same way a seller with an un-updated house is.

For all the talk about the daughter needing a yard, the first house was the only one they even talked about the yard in. They didn't show the yard of the second house, and though they showed it, they didn't discuss the yard in the third house.

The person I ended up feeling bad for was the mother's mother, who they've been living with for six years. And the daughter, who still doesn't have her own room.

Edited by Mystery, Feb 22, 2012 @ 1:19 AM.

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#2583

Suby

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Posted Feb 22, 2012 @ 12:11 PM

I'm in it because these shows are about snooping inside other people's houses

Me too. I've been fascinated by other people's house since I was little. These house hunter/real estate shows are my porn, lol.
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#2584

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Posted Feb 22, 2012 @ 1:55 PM

It's right for a lot of people not to buy. But I don't think it makes an entertaining episode. What's next? Dog Whisperer episodes where the dog owners give the dog up?


There are Dog Whisperer episodes where the owners give the dog up.
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#2585

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Posted Feb 22, 2012 @ 2:41 PM

I don't care whether anyone buys something in the show. I have no vested interest and actually think it's more interesting and more realistic when people don't buy - especially in today's real estate market where buyers are extremely reluctant to buy when they don't have a pressing need.

I think the daughter had her own room - it was just that she didn't have the ability to have sleep over parties or whatever since the space was shared with the mother. My own experience is that many cultures don't mind having children and grandchildren living under the same roof - especially in a situation like this where the mother didn't appear to be a free loader.

I understand why she didn't buy the house. If the house needed renovations to bring it up to a certain market value, then it was worth $X - not counting any aggravation. It appears that the home was being sold "as is" which means that if she had discovered any kind of hidden issues, she still would have to purchase it.

I have no idea where the town was but it appeared that there were quite a lot of homes in her price range or even lower. No reason why she (or anyone) shouldn't wait until exactly what they want appears. I don't think in this case, the woman was being overly picky as she was prepared to do some updating - and wasn't the first house the one that had squeezed the bathroom into what was once the coat closet by the front door?
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#2586

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Posted Feb 22, 2012 @ 3:30 PM

Both the mother and the friend mentioned that in a new house, the daughter would have her own room. When Egypt noted that the daughter looked disappointed at one point, the friend said that she was looking forward to having her own room.

I didn't say the mother should have bought it; I said that I didn't agree with Egypt's definition of "doing her homework." And I was surprised that she didn't buy it, but that doesn't mean she SHOULD have.
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#2587

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Posted Mar 6, 2012 @ 11:09 PM

And yet another show where they don't buy. These people knew from the first minute that they were priced out of their desired two neighborhoods. They wasted a lot of someone's time (I can't believe Egypt showed them over 50 houses herself). The woman had the right idea; they need to save more money if they're not going to compromise on location. The guy was totally clueless with his "No one wants to compromise to our budget." Why in the world should a seller compromise to HIS budget?
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#2588

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Posted Mar 7, 2012 @ 11:41 AM

These NY episodes are getting a little frustrating, because some of the buyers are so married to a specific neighborhood. In last night's ep, they wouldn't even consider moving 10 minutes away from family. I think a lot of the buyers know they're not going to buy anything and just want to be on TV.
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#2589

EndoKE

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Posted Mar 9, 2012 @ 9:13 AM

The only thing I like about the NY episodes are that we're seeing neighborhoods that aren't on "Selling NY."
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#2590

yslchyc

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Posted Mar 9, 2012 @ 1:12 PM

I don't have any problems when they don't buy because at least to me PV is about the process and I think the process accurately reflects what is going on with a lot of first time buyers - especially in relatively expensive locations.

This couple had absolutely no pressing need to buy a house unless they found one that hit all the buttons. I didn't think any of the choices were that great. Since they had no need to buy and prices aren't rising particularly, they are much better off doing exactly what they did - holding off until they can save enough to afford the next tier of housing in the location they want.

To me it makes much more sense than these 21 year old newlyweds have absolutely have to buy a house right away because it makes them feel like adults.

In the area they are looking at, they can rent quite a nice apartment for far less than purchasing a house they didn't like.

Neighborhoods are quite specific and aside from being close to family, there are also issues relating to schools, transportation and general feel that make lots of people in NYC very "local" in terms of where they want to be.
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#2591

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Posted Mar 9, 2012 @ 2:11 PM

Ugh. Why can't they get out of the boroughs already? Maybe even. I don't know. New Hampshire? Texas? Oklahoma? Are there only Property Virgins in Toronto or New York state?

Yet more people priced out of the insane housing market. If 'middle class' people can't buy, where do poor people live?
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#2592

yslchyc

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Posted Mar 9, 2012 @ 3:05 PM

Ugh. Why can't they get out of the boroughs already? Maybe even. I don't know. New Hampshire? Texas? Oklahoma? Are there only Property Virgins in Toronto or New York state?

Yet more people priced out of the insane housing market. If 'middle class' people can't buy, where do poor people live?


The original PV had shows in San Diego, Boston, Florida, Virginia and a few other locations I can't remember. Perhaps this will similarly move as they do more shows. It goes to production costs and probably scouting appropriate virgins.

I don't have an issue with NY and the environs because it covers an awful lot of housing and also represents the typical buying experience of many people who live in urban areas and don't want to commute 2 hours to a larger new home in the boonies.

I don't know what poor is since definitions vary so much but I don't think the poor in most areas are buying homes because in general housing would be beyond their means. They are renting. The boroughs actually have some pretty decent rentals in the kind of neighborhoods they are looking at - i.e. not trendy and not close to Manhattan. Since he was a fireman and she was a nurse, I bet they worked in Queens and didn't have to deal with commuting into the city daily.
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#2593

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Posted Mar 11, 2012 @ 11:07 PM

I don't have an issue with NY and the environs because it covers an awful lot of housing and also represents the typical buying experience of many people who live in urban areas and don't want to commute 2 hours to a larger new home in the boonies.

My problem is that NY doesn't represent all urban areas. Far from it. Buying a home in, say, Phoenix or Dallas or any number of other large cities is very different. It bugs me that "NY" is supposed to equal "urban" to everyone. Life outside the northeast is very, very different.
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#2594

TheOverdog

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Posted Mar 12, 2012 @ 9:54 AM

Ugh. Why can't they get out of the boroughs already? Maybe even. I don't know. New Hampshire? Texas? Oklahoma? Are there only Property Virgins in Toronto or New York state?


. My problem is that NY doesn't represent all urban areas. Far from it. Buying a home in, say, Phoenix or Dallas or any number of other large cities is very different.


With Sandra, they did several episodes in Texas. The most notable featured a loopy red haired lady who bought a rent to own crapshack. There was another where the couple was looking for a home in the DFW area sort of near DFW airport, and two of the houses they looked at were close to 70 miles apart, but they didn't mention that on the show.

I actually think this difference in density that drives people to not concerned at all about neighborhoods is the major difference between searching for real estate in the north east vs the south/west, with the major cities in CA being the only exception. For example, I'm not sure there are too many people who say "I want to live in New York", and then actually choose a house in Danbury CT, but that's not at all uncommon in DFW.

I believe they also featured Austin and San Antonio, but can't remember enough details to where it might have been one of the PV clones.

Edited by TheOverdog, Mar 12, 2012 @ 10:05 AM.

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#2595

chessiegal

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Posted Mar 12, 2012 @ 10:59 AM

Sandra also did shows in Florida and Washington, DC.
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#2596

yslchyc

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Posted Mar 12, 2012 @ 12:20 PM

For example, I'm not sure there are too many people who say "I want to live in New York", and then actually choose a house in Danbury CT, but that's not at all uncommon in DFW.


That would be unfathomable LOL. People in NYC tend to stay within their boroughs as well since it's actually more difficult to get from borough to borough than into Manhattan which is the central hub.

Once people opt for the suburbs, I think there is more flexibility although even then people will have made a decision whether to do the Guyland, Westchester or specific parts of NJ. And within those areas, a lot would depend on one's commute as well as school districts.

I guess most of these shows seem to concentrate so much on the bland newer suburbs of Florida, that I enjoy the older urban areas that are homes to the working and middle class. Neither HH or PV has really done much with this kind of home buying experience but quite a bit with the others where you can get a bland tract home on a starter budget in some nondescript suburb or satellite town since they all resemble each other - small to medium open plan living dining room/kitchen that is superficially modern and on trend and 2 bathrooms/3 bedrooms - again done to the typical bland current tastes of the home seekers. They will have a walk in closet (either too small or if large enough another room will be "tight"); master bathroom will have two sinks or if not - complaints about the lack. The two guest bedrooms will generally be disproportionately small so as to enable the master bedroom to not be *tight* and to have a large walk in closet and bathroom.
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#2597

TheOverdog

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Posted Mar 12, 2012 @ 4:33 PM

I guess most of these shows seem to concentrate so much on the bland newer suburbs of Florida, that I enjoy the older urban areas that are homes to the working and middle class


The show has featured homes as cheap as $60k I think, so that's lower/working class as it gets. Any less than that and you are renting. I know some people like the older home stock, but remember those were the tract houses of their day. Witness all those awful row houses in Toronto and other places in the northeast featured so often. It's just that styles have changed.
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#2598

Mystery

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Posted Mar 13, 2012 @ 11:37 PM

I loved Ariana's father. The perfect combination of knowledge without pushiness.
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#2599

ScrubMonkey

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Posted Mar 14, 2012 @ 1:21 PM

The old PV did have shows in other states but then it seemed Sandra went to Toronto and environs exclusively. Then, this year, new host and it's only the NY area. I had the same issue with Mike on Real Estate Intervention. He stuck mostly to Maryland and DC.

Maybe these shows should have hosts in various parts of the U.S.

I am slightly happier this week though because at least, and at last, someone actually bought something. I'm sure it helps that her father could do any improvements for her for free, though. I sure wish we had that luxury as we continue looking for a house that's what we want, or under budget to factor in any updates...

I thought she chose the best one of the choices we saw.
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#2600

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Posted Mar 20, 2012 @ 7:31 AM

The old PV did have shows in other states but then it seemed Sandra went to Toronto and environs exclusively. Then, this year, new host and it's only the NY area. I had the same issue with Mike on Real Estate Intervention. He stuck mostly to Maryland and DC.

But the difference with Mike is that he is actually a successful real estate agent who mainly worked in the DC/Maryland area.

Sandra traveled around but it was always with a "real" real estate broker working behind the scenes for her. Same with Egypt.

Speaking of Egypt, she is kind of growing on me. I watched a couple episodes with her last night and wasn't as turned off as I was at first. Either she's toned it down a bit or I've gotten used to her.
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#2601

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Posted Mar 20, 2012 @ 8:38 AM

Sandra Rinomato is a "real" real estate agent. Obviously when she traveled outside the area where she is licensed (Toronto) HGTV had the property virgin work with their own real estate agent. Don't know if they did the same in Toronto, but at least she could have worked as the agent there. A woman on PV that filmed in DC came on this thread and discussed how the process worked.

Here's a link to Sandra's brokerage firm.

Rinomato RE brokerage
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#2602

yslchyc

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Posted Mar 20, 2012 @ 9:12 AM

I doubt that Egypt is acting as anyone's actual real estate agent because it would be a ridiculous waste of time for her to do so. Anyone buying a home - let alone a first home - should be looking at more than three homes which is the *fiction* on this show except for a few episodes in which they did time elapse to illustrate that they were looking at huge numbers of homes although those homes were never shown.
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#2603

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Posted Mar 20, 2012 @ 12:46 PM

Obviously when she traveled outside the area where she is licensed (Toronto) HGTV had the property virgin work with their own real estate agent.

Yes, but she did not scout homes for people, she did not make any of the phone calls you see on the show, and she did not broker the deals. Her "people" do that.

People have reported in this thread that she just shows up, says her lines, and leaves.

I don't get that sense from Mike (I could be wrong) which is why it makes sense for him to always work in the same area.
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#2604

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Posted Mar 20, 2012 @ 1:38 PM

I don't get that sense from Mike (I could be wrong) which is why it makes sense for him to always work in the same area.


I would imagine if the franchise had survived that might have expanded territorially but they killed the series.

If they had kept the original format - delusional seller - I don't think it would have worked by having a non-geographically based hard nosed "appraiser" like Mike since the whole point of the show is that Mike had a sophisticated understanding of what the real estate market in the DC area was like.

Of course, any real estate agents in generally should only work where they actually know the *territory* which is why Sandra traveling anywhere was preposterous since there would be no way she could actually advise anyone buying outside of Toronto - even if licensing weren't an issue.

Even Egypt dealing in the NY metropolitan area is not credible to me as anything other than a generic host since no real estate agent would be covering the territory that she has in her show. But I suspend my disbelief with that just as I suspend my disbelief in terms of the back story; the decoy homes and all the other crap and just accept it as a general snapshot of real estate available at certain price points in different areas.
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#2605

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Posted Mar 21, 2012 @ 11:28 AM

I did get that sense from Mike - that he was not acting as an agent for any of the REI delusional sellers. In fact, IIRC, a time or two he mentioned that he knew their agent. Plus, he worked a much larger geographical area on the show than most agents IRL would work. For starters, I seem to remember them filming in DC, Maryland (both Baltimore and Upper Maryland) and Virginia (at least Northern, if not more). Even if any or all of those areas operate jointly under a common board of realtors (IDK), that's far too much territory for a realtor to "farm". Incidentally, ITA, Sandra also did not work as an agent for the PV show participants, either Toronto or other areas.

Besides the extreme amount of time required to successfully complete even one RE transaction, television production companies and/or networks probably don't care to take on any legal liability WRT the RE transactions either depicted or dramatized on their reality tv programs.

Edited by diydude, Mar 21, 2012 @ 4:37 PM.

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#2606

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Posted Mar 25, 2012 @ 9:11 AM

For example, I'm not sure there are too many people who say "I want to live in New York", and then actually choose a house in Danbury CT.


My aunt actually did that because she was unwilling to compromise on the finishing of her condo and didn't want to pay more.

For starters, I seem to remember them filming in DC, Maryland (both Baltimore and Upper Maryland) and Virginia (at least Northern, if not more). Even if any or all of those areas operate jointly under a common board of realtors (IDK), that's far too much territory for a realtor to "farm".


It's not that unusual for realtors to be licensed in more than one state where the metro region spills out over more than one state boundary: Minneapolis-St. Paul, Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky (there was at least one episode of Property Virgins filmed here), NYC, and DC metro. In my experience there real-estate agents tend to be more familiar with the different neighborhoods that have more of the same "feel": upscale neighborhoods, working class, or transitional. The thing that always irritated me with this show, old and new, is that we never got a good sense of distance on the show. It would be nice to know what the relative distance between the various properties and the virgins desired neighborhood or jobs or city center. They could even do that over the map graphic. The show is entertainment, but can also be anthropological as it shows people how other parts of the country live.
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#2607

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Posted Mar 25, 2012 @ 1:08 PM

WRT the types of RE available, the areas of Upper Maryland and/or NoVirginia have little in common with DC. We're not talking about twin cities. That's not the issue, however. Basically, none of the HGTV host/realtors actually represent the buyers in the RE transaction either depicted or dramatized on their programs. It doesn't happen on REI or PV. It also doesn't happen on PB - no matter how many times the twins try to tell you otherwise.

BTW, we occasionally see an out-of-area realtor list a property in our metropolitan area. Same thing happens each time - the listing sits and sits - as nearly every other property quickly sells with multiple offers.

Edited by diydude, Mar 25, 2012 @ 1:36 PM.

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#2608

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Posted May 15, 2012 @ 7:28 PM

Mr Monkey and I both really like the new multi-episode in one format. Please, continue that, Show.

We also much prefer Sandra to Egypt as a host.
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#2609

coffeeloverfrea

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Posted May 16, 2012 @ 9:32 PM

I've seen a few of the episodes hosted by Egypt now and I have to ask: Does nobody buy a house on Egypt's show?

Sandra would get the occasional property virgins who weren't ready to buy. But it seems like the majority of Egypt's clients decide for one reason or another not to buy a house.

I know she's not actually their real estate agent, so it can't be that she's bad at her job. I wonder what the story is? Poor scouting / pre-qualification?
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#2610

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Posted May 17, 2012 @ 7:52 AM

I wonder what the story is? Poor scouting / pre-qualification?

A glut of people who just want to be on television, disregarding the intended plot of the story?
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