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#2251

selhars

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Posted Nov 12, 2010 @ 9:17 PM

By the time they came back, I had already found my place, put the downpayment on it, and everything. So when they showed me the "3rd option", I had to pretend that I had never seen it before, putting my acting skills to good use! They just told me to recreate what I could remember saying and doing the first time I saw it. After that, we went somewhere else where Sandra was to show up and "tell me if my bid was accepted" and let me know if *she* was able to negotiate anything. She came back and phrased it in a way that made it sound like she did the calls to the management company for me, the negotiations, and everything else. And then, of course, I had to act excited and surprised. So, really, she'd come out of her trailer a couple of times per day to film short spots, and that was all I heard from her.


foster729 so the entire back-and-forth about the bid being accepted, whether you might have competition, the negotiation part is fake. Did you get a sense of WHO decides or HOW it's decided what the 'scenario' would be with your episode.

I ask because in various shows we've seen various 'scenarios':
- a young Delaware couple who loved the first house they saw, but just 'the next day' by the time they saw the second house the first house they wanted was already gone, then the sale fell through due to radon
- a gay Toronto couple whose seller pulled the house off the market to get more money, then the seller later called and wanted a deal
- a MD couple who bought a town house they hadn't even SEEN (but they'd seen one 'just like it' in the same complex)
- last night a young couple buying with HER mother, went back to the second house they saw and bought that one

Do you think these are the real scenarios that happened in their sales, and what really happened was re-created?
Or do the producers make up the scenario and the drama, and just 'assign' a story line to a show and make buyers act that scenario even if it never happened like that.

One way is having Sandra come back and recreate what happened with the real sale negotiations, another is making up out of whole cloth a complete fabrication.

Edited by selhars, Nov 12, 2010 @ 9:19 PM.

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#2252

jjj

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Posted Nov 13, 2010 @ 1:10 AM

These backstory insights are fascinating -- thanks so much for clarifying how the show worked for your episode. I suspect they have to re-create the final sale acceptance in many cases, because in real life, that many deals don't work out in situations where there are competing bids. I am glad to hear Sandra is fun. At least it is not quite as fake as "House Hunters".
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#2253

foster729

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Posted Nov 13, 2010 @ 12:01 PM

foster729 so the entire back-and-forth about the bid being accepted, whether you might have competition, the negotiation part is fake. Did you get a sense of WHO decides or HOW it's decided what the 'scenario' would be with your episode.

I ask because in various shows we've seen various 'scenarios':
- a young Delaware couple who loved the first house they saw, but just 'the next day' by the time they saw the second house the first house they wanted was already gone, then the sale fell through due to radon
- a gay Toronto couple whose seller pulled the house off the market to get more money, then the seller later called and wanted a deal
- a MD couple who bought a town house they hadn't even SEEN (but they'd seen one 'just like it' in the same complex)
- last night a young couple buying with HER mother, went back to the second house they saw and bought that one

Do you think these are the real scenarios that happened in their sales, and what really happened was re-created?
Or do the producers make up the scenario and the drama, and just 'assign' a story line to a show and make buyers act that scenario even if it never happened like that.

One way is having Sandra come back and recreate what happened with the real sale negotiations, another is making up out of whole cloth a complete fabrication.



Selhars,
Well, the way it was explained to me was that they wanted to show what my process was. When I went through it with my local realtor, he did the negotiation and the explanation about the fees, the closing, etc. So when they came back, they just wanted to make it seem like Sandra did everything because the film crew missed it all. So it really was somewhat of a recreation in my case- I saw my place and fell in love with it. I called my bank, got authorization for the money for a down payment, and literally wanted to start the process that day. The units were selling out really quickly (the ones that had the same layout and square footage as mine, anyways) and I wanted to make sure that I got it.

One thing that I didn't really like was the fact that they (the production team, not Sandra- again, Sandra really didn't have much interaction with me) told me that they were only able to have so many "no-buys" per season. There was a lot of pressure to buy. Thankfully, I was able to find my place and while it was a little more than I wanted to spend, I had the money and it IS a good investment, especially in this neighborhood. If I hadn't have found this place and they would have come back when they did, and I would have felt very uncomfortable with buying one of the first places that they showed me or the yet-unknown third place that they would have had to come up with. I think I would have had to reread anything that I filled out when I signed up for the show!

Basically, I think their timeline is definitely screwed up when the show the people on tv. Also, Sandra really didn't help me at all, but I don't know about anyone else. Others may have had no idea what they were doing (I had very little, but would like to think that I have a bit of common sense) and so they found her to be helpful. Otherwise, I'm not sure about everyone else's experience.

Stinkymcgee, my "ideal" neighborhood is Georgetown. Um....... there is NO parking (all street parking, and impossible to find anything), it's all older, small row houses for millions of dollars, no metro station (though the GW metro is close, but a crappy walk in cold or really hot weather), and traffic is gridlock a lot of the time. It's just not my thing. But whatever. And you know, a funny thing is that they would have me repeat some stupid/funny things that I would say (jokes, observations, etc) because they didn't have the camera on me or something. I'm glad that some of the silly things that I said didn't make the show, but there were definitely some things that I was embarrassed about. Like, faces I would make or just silly things I would do that they wanted on film. Oops! :)
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#2254

shlbycindyk

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Posted Nov 14, 2010 @ 2:00 PM

It's nice to read how it really happens from someone who has been on Property Virgins. I had a feeling a lot of it was staged but I wasn't sure. It's also good to know that Sandra is a nice person. I like her. Thanks for sharing.
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#2255

stinkymcgee

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Posted Nov 16, 2010 @ 11:49 AM

One more question, foster729, if you don't mind -- How and when, storyline-wise, did you get in touch with PV? Had you begun condo-shopping with your realtor? Had you already found your place before the show got involved? Or did you apply to be on the show and then begin the search after the crew arrived?

I guess that's more like four questions... but they're all part of the same thing in my head.
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#2256

foster729

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Posted Nov 17, 2010 @ 8:23 AM

This is going to sound silly, but here goes. I distinctly remember it was a Thursday night as I was falling asleep, and you know how you just tend to have random things running through your head as you try to fall asleep? I had been mulling around the idea of buying a place here and I had a thought of these tv shows... My First Place, Property Virgins, etc. So the next day, I went online just to check out the TLC and HGTV websites. And sure enough, there was a little announcement on the HGTV website that something along the lines of "Are you a first-time homebuyer in the DC metro area looking for help and to buy your place within the next 6 months to a year? Email us at blahblahblah" So, I emailed, they got back with me and had me fill out a questionnaire, they then called me for a phone interview, then they came down from Canada to do an in-person interview, and then I got accepted. So, I guess that answers your question(s). :)
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#2257

stinkymcgee

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Posted Nov 17, 2010 @ 8:53 AM

So, I guess that answers your question(s). :)

Almost! Did you start the process with your realtor during that questionnaire/interview time, or did you see the two PV condos and then start looking on your own?
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#2258

foster729

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Posted Nov 17, 2010 @ 1:45 PM

Ah. I hadn't even started looking. I obviously knew the areas and neighborhoods that would be acceptable, but nothing in particular. They came, filmed me getting shown the first two places, and it was only then where I started looking with a realtor. They gave me a few months in which to get it done before they came back, which was a bit stressful.
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#2259

stinkymcgee

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Posted Nov 17, 2010 @ 4:28 PM

They gave me a few months in which to get it done before they came back, which was a bit stressful.

At least it wasn't all rolled into two or three days of searching, as they often try to spin the story. Thanks for coming back and clarifying!
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#2260

MethodActor05

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Posted Nov 18, 2010 @ 3:21 AM

There was this episode with this Toronto couple who did not seem to understand the concept of a starter house. They kept whining about the houses that were in their price range- and also at the open concept, which I thought was interesting since it goes against the general line about wanting open concept. They finally bucked up and plucked the extra 50 grand to get the kind of house they wanted, but I just kept thinking that they'd be so screwed if anything goes wrong financially.

On the other hand, there was this episode with this very cute 20-something Boston guy who worked for a non-profit who got this nice affordable housing condo in the center of Boston. I thought he seemed like a very nice guy with some realistic expectations, and his girlfriend seemed pretty nice and grounded as well. I loved how he seemed so generally thrilled with the condo he had gotten, and it really did seem like a great place to be in.

Then I saw a Pembroke Pines, Fla episode with a Latina couple with a rock-bottom budget. I was absolutely shocked at how low a lot of these houses were- a 114k house and a 120k house just doesn't exist in Delaware unless we're talking a burned-out shell in Wilmington. Even with the foundation problems the one house had it still would have been closer to the 200k mark where I'm from. I guess prices in some parts of Florida have really gone down that low.

Edited by MethodActor05, Nov 18, 2010 @ 4:00 AM.

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#2261

Bastet Esq

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Posted Nov 18, 2010 @ 3:37 PM

On the other hand, there was this episode with this very cute 20-something Boston guy who worked for a non-profit who got this nice affordable housing condo in the center of Boston. I thought he seemed like a very nice guy with some realistic expectations, and his girlfriend seemed pretty nice and grounded as well. I loved how he seemed so generally thrilled with the condo he had gotten, and it really did seem like a great place to be in.


I didn't see the end of that one; did the girlfriend live with him? Because the introduction was all about her role being to offer advice and support and when touring homes she'd say, "you" (this would work for you, this is within your budget, I don't think you'd like this, etc.) but he kept saying "we." She even said "we" a couple of times, too.
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#2262

schnauzerlover

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Posted Nov 18, 2010 @ 4:52 PM

And wasn't there a quick exchange about closet space? I liked them a lot, especially him when he kept asking Sandra "Why am I here?" because he couldn't believe that downtown location was affordable for him.
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#2263

MittenGirl

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Posted Nov 18, 2010 @ 7:31 PM

I wondered about the Boston guy/girlfriend, too. They talked about him applying for the condo, that they would check his application/financials. I wondered if maybe they wouldn't qualify to live there, so they just made sure to talk about him, only.

I can't imagine they could kick you out for getting married, since they said that he wouldn't be booted for making more money in the future. But perhaps their combined household income would exceed limits. If they are pretending to not be a couple in order to qualify for that nice condo, I kind of hate them.
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#2264

Bastet Esq

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Posted Nov 18, 2010 @ 8:12 PM

If they are pretending to not be a couple in order to qualify for that nice condo, I kind of hate them.


When Sandra was faux-reviewing the application with him, she noted the page on which he needed to fill out information regarding everyone who would be living in the condo, but we could not see whether he included anyone other than himself. If they were cohabitating but pretending not to be so that he could qualify for that program/condo, PV was complicit in the charade in that they took pains to include the opening segment that all but stated she was not a live-in girlfriend.

I can't imagine they could kick you out for getting married, since they said that he wouldn't be booted for making more money in the future.


Discrimination based on marital status would violate fair housing laws, and they noted that a future increase in income would not disqualify one who qualified at the time of purchase. So perhaps they were pretending it was just going to be him and then she'd just happen to move in later when the real plan was for her to live there all along. Or maybe they're just bad actors and got their "you"s and "we"s mixed up. Or maybe, since he was, by far, the one who said "we" the most, he was hoping she'd move in.

Edited by Bastet Esq, Nov 18, 2010 @ 8:15 PM.

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#2265

MittenGirl

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Posted Nov 19, 2010 @ 1:18 AM

Discrimination based on marital status would violate fair housing laws


I didn't quite phrase that correctly. I meant that raising the household's income after he purchases, by virtue of getting married, wouldn't seem to affect their ability to live there. Obviously merely getting married can't disqualify them.

I just got the feeling that together they would make too much money to be able to be able to qualify for whatever program was allowing such a low purchase price. So they, er, he, was qualifying for purchase on his income alone from working for a non-profit, and then she would join the household after the sale.

I would hope they did not say that outright to Sandra or PV.
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#2266

fifthcolumnista

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Posted Nov 19, 2010 @ 9:15 AM

There's a lot of scamming that goes on with the subsidizing housing although I have no idea whether this guy was living by himself. At least on the show, he and the girl weren't living together and as I recall the apartment was pretty small.

I had friends and relatives who were living in the Mitchell Lama and Amalgamated coops built in NYC in the late 1950's and 1960's and the place was full of people who were able to under report their income. There were also a lot of people living in larger apartments because they claimed that adult children were living with them.

I don't know if it's true of the Boston unit but in theory there's no upside on the subsidized coops in NYC as you have to sell to someone on the waiting list at a predetermined price which is well below FMV - Of course you GOT it at well below FMV.
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#2267

BowlOfXmasCandy

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Posted Nov 19, 2010 @ 9:24 AM

a young Delaware couple who loved the first house they saw, but just 'the next day' by the time they saw the second house the first house they wanted was already gone, then the sale fell through due to radon

My sister was the one who bought the house first. She and the seller went back and forth for about a week then they agreed on the price. Then the Radon issue came up and she backed out of the house as she felt it would be dangerous for her family. Then this past winter 2 people had co2 poisoning was rushed to the hospital the newspaper did not give an exact address just the block and street name and we are still wondering to today if it was the house she backed out of.
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#2268

selina720

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Posted Nov 19, 2010 @ 11:53 AM

I don't believe radon causes CO2 poisoning. CO2 poisoning usually occurs when people are running a generator or car or something in a garage and the gas isn't properly ventilated to the outside. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can accumulate in houses and has been linked to the development of certain cancers; it usually accumulates in the basement of a house. Radon remediation systems are relatively inexpensive and very effective at removing the gas and establishing a safe level of gas, equal to what you may be exposed to outside or in any environment. Obviously, you need to be comfortable with your home choice, but depending on the level of radon and the efficacy of the remediation system, radon need not preclude you - and clearly didn't with these PV - from purchasing a home.

re: Pembroke Pines - It is unreal how low property values have dipped in FL. We lived there from 04-07 and the houses in the neighborhood where we were have fallen from a high of $425k to about $200k. You can get a really nice house there for relatively little money, particularly compared to how expensive the homes used to be.
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#2269

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Posted Nov 20, 2010 @ 6:43 AM

Ugh, the painful rerun of the San Diego military man and his incredibly idiotic and demanding wife. Their wish list was beyond ridiculous to the point of her demands for a two car garage when they didn't even have a second car. Wanting a palace with no money down and being surprised when they kept getting beaten out on bids. Couldn't even finish watching it - it had foreclosure written all over it.
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#2270

beezer

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Posted Nov 20, 2010 @ 8:09 AM

I saw it was them and almost turned it off but then left it on - and quite enjoyed it more knowing she'd get shit-all.

"This would have to be changed, it doesn't have my granite!" You don't have any granite. You don't have a downpayment, maybe stop theoretically putting thousands of bucks of stone into houses that you're bidding the very top of your entirely mortgaged budget on.

I did wonder, given the explanations we've gotten about how they tape, what happened here.

I have to say the inside view was pretty much what I thought and I'm glad it's not like HH, where it's just a big fake deal - I've never really believed she runs off and calls other agents who magically get a hold of their sellers and get a response back in the time it takes to drink a coffee (maybe that's happened but this show makes it seem like that's a normal occurance).

I guess they went over the time window for filming in their area and they just wanted to wrap them up but geez - and they had Sandra at least doing voiceovers as if they were chatting further.

I did wonder what happened to them though. Dolts.
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#2271

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Posted Nov 25, 2010 @ 12:35 PM

I saw it was them and almost turned it off but then left it on - and quite enjoyed it more knowing she'd get shit-all.


I hate to diss any member of the military because, God knows, they do a job for which I would never volunteer. But in the spirit of military campaigns, he really needs to take evasive action and ditch the wife ASAP. She's poison.
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#2272

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Posted Dec 1, 2010 @ 7:57 PM

I'm new to PV but enjoy HH. The differences interest me. I do like that it isn't set that they'll buy (though assumed it wasn't quite "real" and read the prior posts from a PV)

I saw one on Monday where the couple brought along the older of their to kids...a girl probably about 12yo. It drove me nuts that the girl seemed to take over....she talked about knocking down a wall! I also thought it was inadvisable to give the girl that much involvement when she might end up being disappointed if things didn't work out. She seemed more into moving than her parents...dad was especially unsure about the plunge into ownership.

Hubby missed part of one showing due to a doctor's appt (well, he was scripted that way). In the end, he couldn't work due to an injury and Sandra explained that would mean they couldn't get their loan (through VA but he was in private industry). Part of me did feel bad for their plans being put off but I was bugged by the fact that it seemed unexpected. Did they really think the loan would still work w/o him in his ob (she waitressed so she had time for the kids)?? I know part of the concept is learning the ropes, but that's a bit much
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#2273

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Posted Dec 1, 2010 @ 9:45 PM

I had seen that episode before, and the young daughter did seem to have too much input into the decision-making. I was glad that the loan fell through because the parents--in particular, the husband--just didn't seem financially or even emotionally ready to buy a house. It almost seemed as if they were doing it just for the daughter.
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#2274

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Posted Dec 2, 2010 @ 10:32 AM

Maybe it was just me, but the two young women (college friends who shared an apartment) and were so, so skittish about buyiing a house that I wondered how on earth they managed to make any major decisions. Buying a home is huge, I know because I've been there, too, but I wasn't really convinced they thought this was such a great idea. Could have just been their personalities. Anyhow, that's a PV I won't watch again.
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#2275

YpsiYvonne

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Posted Dec 2, 2010 @ 12:12 PM

Maybe it was just me, but the two young women (college friends who shared an apartment) and were so, so skittish about buyiing a house that I wondered how on earth they managed to make any major decisions. Buying a home is huge, I know because I've been there, too, but I wasn't really convinced they thought this was such a great idea. Could have just been their personalities. Anyhow, that's a PV I won't watch again.


I've seen that episode a few times and I actually liked these women. I couldn't be friends with them (their uncertainty would drive me nuts) but they were pleasant enough to watch.

I've always been amazed at how much alike they looked. Besides dressing similarly, they had similar features (despite being different ethnicities). I've also been told that my best friend and I look alike, so maybe we begin to morph into our friends?
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#2276

nyghtcruzer

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Posted Dec 3, 2010 @ 9:59 AM

yes the episode the the 12 year old daughter drove me nuts. They needed to leave her ass at home. She was a bit much and the father was a woosh....
I would be damned if any of my sons at that time were going to give me an opinion of something that "I" am spending "my" money on. Sorry boys, love ya to death, but Papa isn't having opinions today.......

This is my house........the key word here is my....

yup, that is one of the "perks" about being an adult !!!!
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#2277

damalanop

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Posted Dec 3, 2010 @ 10:06 AM

I caught the first few minutes of the episode with the two best friends that were buying a home together. For whatever reason these two didn't capture my attention long enough for me to sit through an entire episode with them. However, their situation did prompt me to ask myself if I'd purchase a home with my best friend? It didn't take much thought for me to come to the conclusion that while I really like and appreciate my best friends, I can say with confidence that I would never buy a home with them. Personality differences aside (at least in my case, because the PVs seemed very much alike personality wise), how would one get out of that sort of transaction if for some reason the friendship went sour, or one of the friends ended up in a committed relationship with someone and wanted to either move them in, or purchase a separate property with the significant other? Just seems like a situation that would be better left to renting.
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#2278

nyghtcruzer

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Posted Dec 3, 2010 @ 10:14 AM

YES, you are so right. Did they not ever think that what happens if another relationship would develop.........Wonder what their parents would have said???

unless maybe they were the relationship ?? possible??
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#2279

stinkymcgee

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Posted Dec 3, 2010 @ 10:15 AM

Was I the only one with the feeling that those two were more than "best friends"? I think it was the way they looked and dressed so similarly that really sold it for me... totally Old Married Couple.

If they are simply friends, I agree that purchasing a house together may not have been the best move -- I know several people IRL who did that just after college and then discovered that they would not all be BFFs forever. It can be a huge hassle.

ETA: apparently I'm not the only one with that feeling. How weird that we cross-posted that!

Edited by stinkymcgee, Dec 3, 2010 @ 10:16 AM.

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#2280

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Posted Dec 3, 2010 @ 10:56 AM

Maybe they are friends with benefits because they each stressed that they wanted their own bedrooms. I wouldn't go into purchasing a house with anyone that I wasn't married to because I would be to scared about what could happen if something went wrong in the relationship. Although marriages break up to, I think that there is a bit more of a safety net there, or perhaps I'm being naive since I've never been married, or divorced, or owned a home with anyone.
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