Jump to content

Independent Lens


  • Please log in to reply

60 replies to this topic

#31

Sharpie66

Sharpie66

    Fanatic

Posted Apr 6, 2012 @ 12:11 PM

I watched for the same reason you did (hearing about it a lot during its festival run). It was terrific, wasn't it? Although I think if I were his daughter, I'd have some serious Elmo issues.

I think my favorite part was when the young girl came to visit him at the workshop, and it was a complete replay of when he visited Kermit Love at his studios back in the 1970s. That girl was so into the whole puppeteering thing, not only having made her own, but being able to identify the classic-era Muppeteers in that photo on the wall.

Not having kids of my own, nor having watched any of the Sesame Street shows with him in it, I never got the appeal of Elmo, but watching this documentary really brought home how beloved he is to children of that generation, just like Kermit and Cookie Monster were for mine.

Seeing Kevin and Elmo interact with children reminded me of that great Sesame Street classic bit, when the little girl and Kermit are reciting the alphabet, and she keeps blurting out "Cookie Monster!" instead of letters. Finally, Kermit (and probably Jim Henson as well) goes storming off in a huff over her lack of concentration on the task, and she looks forlornly at him offscreen and says plaintively, "I love you..." Kermit comes back and says, "I love you, too" and gives her a big hug. Best SS moment ever!

It was a full 90 minute broadcast.
  • 0

#32

Alexa

Alexa

    Fanatic

Posted Apr 6, 2012 @ 12:29 PM

I forgot to mention that the part that cracked me up was when the other guy did Elmo at first and Elmo sounded like a caveman type character. Hilarious after knowing Elmo as he is now for so long.

I was certainly glad to see the full 90 minutes, but mainly just glad to see it altogether. I am considering the dvd for the extras....not sure yet.
  • 0

#33

Trini Girl

Trini Girl

    Stalker

Posted Apr 11, 2012 @ 12:10 AM

I already knew some of Kevin Clash's story, but it was great to see this documentary with all the video, etc. related to his evolving career.
  • 0

#34

Writer13

Writer13

    Fanatic

Posted Apr 15, 2012 @ 8:52 PM

I'm so glad that I was able to catch this. It's wonderful that Kevin is being a mentor just as Kermit was to him; I feel like there aren't mentors like this anymore.

And I just love Elmo. I totally want to visit Sesame Street!

ETA: I wish they would have mentioned Elmo with adult audiences. He's always great on talk shows (or holding his own ground with Ricky Gervais).

Edited by Writer13, Apr 19, 2012 @ 5:53 AM.

  • 0

#35

BDArizona

BDArizona

    Fanatic

Posted May 18, 2012 @ 1:26 AM

Just watched Independent Lens about the destruction of the Ethnic Studies program at Tucson High. It touches me personally, since I can walk out onto my porch and see THMS. Calling the programs "hate speech", "sedition", and "anti-American" is the worst kind of Orwellian nonsense.
  • 0

#36

Cgr

Cgr

    Fanatic

Posted May 18, 2012 @ 9:41 AM

Just watched Independent Lens about the destruction of the Ethnic Studies program at Tucson High

I haven't seen that one on my TV schedule. I sure hope it runs here. Was Luis Urrea featured. He is a wonderful author that I follow and he has had his books banned and has much to say on the issue. I hope I get to see this feature.
  • 0

#37

Major Misfit

Major Misfit

    Fanatic

Posted May 19, 2012 @ 12:32 PM

You can watch it online here on PBS' website.
  • 0

#38

Cgr

Cgr

    Fanatic

Posted May 19, 2012 @ 5:11 PM

Thanks for that. I won't watch online but it is shown here on Tues so will watch it then!
  • 0

#39

Deanie87

Deanie87

    Fanatic

Posted Oct 2, 2012 @ 10:52 AM

Did anyone watch Half the Sky last night?  I only caught the end of it, but it looked really interesting, but parts were very hard to watch.  Although the stories of the women were often unbearably sad (and infuriating), the piece overall had a hopeful tone.  I was wary of the whole "celebrity visits a third world country and is moved to tears" aspect of it, but the parts I saw weren't that bad.  I really only saw the girl from Cambodia who must sell lottery tickets to pay for her education (which featured Gabrielle Union) and she was just beautiful, but you could see that she was terrified of her father.  

There is another segment on tonight as well. http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/half-the-sky/

ETA - Lots of formatting problems.

Edited by Deanie87, Oct 2, 2012 @ 11:06 AM.

  • 0

#40

braggtastic

braggtastic

    Stalker

Posted Oct 2, 2012 @ 1:05 PM

I read the book, but didn't feel the need to watch the show, mostly because of the 'celebrity visits a third world country...' that you mentioned.
  • 0

#41

Cgr

Cgr

    Fanatic

Posted Oct 3, 2012 @ 7:43 AM

I started watching it and had to quit. I know things like that happen and if there is a way I can help I will. But I don't need details. I applaud the people working on this.
  • 0

#42

Bastet Esq

Bastet Esq

    Stalker

Posted Oct 3, 2012 @ 12:35 PM

I read the book, and I'm recording the documentary but haven't yet watched any of it. I don't remember the celebrity angle being included in the summary I read in the PBS survey about this season's programming. On the one hand, it turns me off, on the other, those I've seen mentioned - Olivia Wilde and America Ferrerra - are intelligent, activist women, so it doesn't feel like a stunt.
  • 0

#43

Deanie87

Deanie87

    Fanatic

Posted Oct 3, 2012 @ 12:48 PM

Yeah, I had to flip back and forth between this and House Hunters. Again, the celebrities weren't intolerable (last night I saw America Ferrera and Olivia Wilde), but a couple of them tried to relate their challenges and setbacks to what these women suffer on a daily basis and it just came off badly. I'm sure that they were trying their best to be supportive and relay universal womanhood, etc. but really, they probably should have just kept that stuff to themselves.

I did find it interesting that the celebrities went to countries that didn't seem to reflect their own ethnic backgrounds (Gabrielle Union in Cambodia and Ferrara in India). I'm not sure why this struck me so much, but it did reinforce the idea of this being a global women's initiative.

At one point, there was a woman who had started her own dress-making business and she was putting her children through school, but was having trouble meeting the tuition of $70. $70!! That was what was standing in the way of her children's future and I found myself really hoping that someone on that film crew gave her the money. I know that they probably aren't supposed to, but how could you not?

This film really made me want to read the book and certainly puts things into perspective. As the author and film maker Nicholas Kristof said (paraphrasing), we aren't better or smarter or more hard working than these women, just luckier.

Edited by Deanie87, Oct 3, 2012 @ 12:49 PM.

  • 0

#44

helenbaby

helenbaby

    Couch Potato

Posted Oct 8, 2012 @ 9:13 PM

I'm so pissed right now. Live in Alabama but for some reason they're not showing As Goes Janesville. It's not as though it's going to change anyone's mind (I've read it's rather controversial.)

Edited by helenbaby, Oct 8, 2012 @ 9:13 PM.

  • 0

#45

Cgr

Cgr

    Fanatic

Posted Oct 10, 2012 @ 4:28 PM

I'm so pissed right now. Live in Alabama but for some reason they're not showing As Goes Janesville.


Try watching online.
  • 0

#46

Morbs

Morbs

    Fanatic

Posted Nov 18, 2012 @ 7:16 PM

Just a notice, the "Park Avenue" episode is a really great look at the 1% and the psychology that goes into how the ultra rich can live in their bubble and be so greedy. I loved it.
  • 0

#47

Cgr

Cgr

    Fanatic

Posted Nov 19, 2012 @ 6:09 AM

I will see if it is on my schedule. I like this show. Lately they all seem to be foreign films that are subtitled. I have to be in a certain mood to do subtitles!
  • 0

#48

braggtastic

braggtastic

    Stalker

Posted Nov 19, 2012 @ 11:03 AM

And the Thirteen logo never disappears from the screen, so there are plenty of times the captions are unreadable because they're behind or atop other letters.
  • 0

#49

melissa1925

melissa1925

    Fanatic

Posted Oct 2, 2013 @ 8:27 AM

"Don't Stop Believing: Everyman's Journey" 

 

"The story of  Filipino singer Arnel Pineda, who was asked to join Journey in 2007"

 

Anyone watch this?    Arnel  Pineda is one amazing singer. He gave me goosebumps.


  • 1

#50

Al Funcoot

Al Funcoot

    Fanatic

Posted Dec 29, 2013 @ 7:47 PM

Did anyone catch "Jiro Dreams of Sushi"? Pretty amazing profile of the only sushi chef to be awarded three Michelin stars, which is a rating meant to say that it's a restaurant worth traveling around the world to try.

 

On one hand I found it exhausting to watch simply because most of the scenes had plenty of white and the subtitles were white with a thin shadow. The documentary itself was pretty incredible. I thought it was funny that all of Jiro's collagues at the fish market, etc seemed a lot like Jiro with the detail and the exacting demands.

 

Plus, once again, I'm amazed at the kind of restaurants that you'll find in Japanese subway stations. The only kind of food I expect to find in a subway station is franchised stuff that's everywhere.


  • 0

#51

Trini Girl

Trini Girl

    Stalker

Posted Dec 29, 2013 @ 11:53 PM

"Don't Stop Believing: Everyman's Journey"


I didn't know much about the band beforehand; but I saw it, and that guy is amazing! I couldn't believe he's in his mid-forties; he looks (and acts) about 20 years younger. He inspired me to try and act younger.
  • 1

#52

braggtastic

braggtastic

    Stalker

Posted Dec 29, 2013 @ 11:58 PM

I saw Jiro in the movie theater. I think it would be easier to read the subtitles there, but I do remember it sometimes being a challenge. Wonderful film.


  • 0

#53

walnutqueen

walnutqueen

    Fanatic

Posted Jan 22, 2014 @ 9:08 AM

Just watched "Blood Brothers" and was moved to tears.  The depth of this young man's compassion and commitment are both humbling and inspiring; the film went a long way towards restoring my faith in humanity.   If you missed it, try catching the repeat (airs on my channel at 2:30 a.m. Sunday 1/26).

 

 

Why would someone leave everything behind to devote their life to helping others? Director Steve Hoover explores that question in Blood Brother, the remarkable story of his long-time friend Rocky Braat, who did exactly that. A young man from a fractured family and a troubled past, Braat went traveling through India without a plan. There he met a group of HIV-positive children living in an orphanage — a meeting that changed everything for him.

 

Braat left his life, friends, and career in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to live with the kids. Filmmaker Steve Hoover was intrigued and unnerved by his best friend’s radical life change. In an effort to find out what compelled him to give up every source of stability in his life, Hoover decided to trace Braat's story, following him to India.

 

He witnessed Rocky and the kids endure disease, abject poverty, and death. But in the midst of all these troubles, he also saw their deep joy, and came to understand why Rocky had given up everything he had to experience it. Blood Brother is a story of friendship and of life stripped down to its essence.

 

 

 

 

 


  • 0

#54

Malibu65

Malibu65

    Stalker

Posted Jan 25, 2014 @ 12:27 AM

I missed the original airing. I really want to watch this. It sounds so fascinating and yet, so sad.


  • 0

#55

walnutqueen

walnutqueen

    Fanatic

Posted Jan 25, 2014 @ 1:18 AM

I can honestly say the subject matter should have been vaguely disturbing and stale to me, yet this was one of the most moving and fascinating documentaries I've seen in this series.  Fair warning - if you have a heart, you will cry, but many of the tears will be good ones, and your heart will swell to bursting with the humanity.

 

I think what moved me the most was Rocky's transition from a young Western guy who would shrink from the ugly reality of these children's live to someone who embraced their world and nursed a dying child (back to life!) with as much tenderness, compassion and selflessness as any "Saint".


  • 0

#56

lz1982

lz1982

    Fanatic

Posted Jan 29, 2014 @ 3:11 PM

I have "Blood Brothers" on my DVR. I will watch when I'm in the mood for something "heavy."

 

I really liked "Don't Stop Believing."


  • 0

#57

Malibu65

Malibu65

    Stalker

Posted Jan 31, 2014 @ 1:30 AM

 

I can honestly say the subject matter should have been vaguely disturbing and stale to me, yet this was one of the most moving and fascinating documentaries I've seen in this series.  Fair warning - if you have a heart, you will cry, but many of the tears will be good ones, and your heart will swell to bursting with the humanity.

It definitely sounds like the kind of documentary I would love, and yes, cry over.


  • 0

#58

BooksRule

BooksRule

    Fanatic

Posted Feb 18, 2014 @ 11:06 AM

I caught most of 'Las Marthas' last night.  I had never heard of the Society of Martha Washington, and was fascinated by the whole concept.  If you weren't able to watch it, hopefully there will be a rerun soon.  The whole concept was so interesting--having a whole series of events on the Texas-Mexico border that focuses on George and Martha Washington culminating with the young women making their debuts in those elaborate gowns.  Such a mixture of history, culture, etc.  I missed a few minutes in the middle, so I hope to catch a rerun.


  • 0

#59

bellN

bellN

    Video Archivist

Posted Mar 27, 2014 @ 7:23 AM

Anyone watch the current episode  of IL, entitled All of Me?  I didn't see anything that advertised or promoted this episode and I stumbled on it by accident. I think body size acceptance and/or weight loss surgery and dieting are more controversial than most partisan political arguments.  I wonder if the lack of promotion had to do with the subject matter - either they thought people wouldn't be interested, or they thought the documentary was actually too controversial. The description from the web site. 

For a group so often vilified, joked about, or ignored, All of Me provides a platform for their stories and encourages viewers to take a fresh look at our own prejudices and complicated relationships with food, fat, and our bodies.

 


  • 0

#60

Suz at Large

Suz at Large

    Fanatic

Posted Mar 27, 2014 @ 12:58 PM

Anyone watch the current episode  of IL, entitled All of Me?  I didn't see anything that advertised or promoted this episode and I stumbled on it by accident.

 

I watched it. I heard about it over on the discussion thread for "My 600-lb. Life." Zsalynn is featured in an episode of that show. At the end of "All of Me," it was disclosed that Zsalynn had applied to a reality TV show which would pay for her weight loss surgery. 

 

I agree; the whole subject of obesity is so complex that it can make my head spin. I'm convinced that there are so many physiological components involved, including how certain foods interact with the brain's pleasure centers. And then there are all the vagaries of personality, other physical conditions, environment, personal history, emotional health, etc. It alternately amuses or infuriates me when someone chirps out a simple-minded one-size-fits-all "solution" for obesity. 

 

I liked many of the women seen on "All of Me," and was hoping the ones working on weight loss would succeed. I probably should watch this again if I haven't wiped it off the DVR, because I thought it avoided a simplistic approach to the subject, and it would be worth a second viewing.


  • 0