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S2: Diana Eng


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#31

Gappy

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 5:05 PM

I dig her character, but not her take on "intellectual" fashion.

#32

Quite Nutty

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 5:05 PM

She's the real life version of Q from James Bond.

#33

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 6:06 PM

I think she's cutely awkward, and loved her "I made it in high school!" prom dress reveal. But check out the picture of her on the Bravo site: not sure why they decided to give her the Punk Va-Va-Voom treatment.

#34

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 6:18 PM

Inferia, gotta agree with you. While I like her overall, I wrote a paper about wearable computing systems ... like 4 or 5 years ago. I guess if she's worked with MIT, they have a wearable computing division, so it's a matter of incorporation more than innovation ...

http://www.media.mit.edu/wearables/

I guess it's kind of cool for people who didn't think about it, but I guess I'm all researched and jaded. LOL.

Still like that she's bringing attention to that aspect of technology though ...

ETA, but I still liked her idea of a camera taking the pic of what made your heart rate increase ...

peachfuzz, I guess her fashion is hit or miss with me. I didn't particularly like the pics they have of her work on Bravo, but there are some things on her site that I completely LOVE ... she has a sweater with this gorgeous flow that I would totally buy if I could ... plus you can see the influence of math on that which makes it all the cooler.

Edited by nenyadr, Dec 8, 2005 @ 9:05 PM.


#35

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 7:25 PM

I think she's cutely awkward, and loved her "I made it in high school!" prom dress reveal. But check out the picture of her on the Bravo site: not sure why they decided to give her the Punk Va-Va-Voom treatment.


I don't like that picture at all, and it doesn't look like her. She would have been pretty enough if they had let her keep some of her own style.

#36

peachfuzz

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 8:58 PM

I guess it's kind of cool for people who didn't think about it, but I guess I'm all researched and jaded. LOL.

I really don't think it's simply a matter of a luddite public gushing "oh, neat!" and being all flabbergasted. For me, I like the way she incorporates the tech elements with clothes that manage to describe organic, fluid movement with very clean, crisp shapes - check out the back of this jacket - the tech stuff echoes that dichotomy, like human emotional response recorded with a cold machine. Pretty interesting, and fairly clever, I think.

I'm not hailing her as the Second Coming or anything - and I could see her getting real gimmicky, real quick - but the clothes are pretty for now, and she seems to put some thought behind them.

#37

Inferia

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 10:25 PM

I like the way she incorporates the tech elements with clothes that manage to describe organic, fluid movement with very clean, crisp shapes - check out the back of this jacket - the tech stuff echoes that dichotomy

Then check out the dress next to it....

#38

nowrite2000

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 10:44 PM

I guess it's kind of cool for people who didn't think about it, but I guess I'm all researched and jaded. LOL.

I really don't think it's simply a matter of a luddite public gushing "oh, neat!" and being all flabbergasted.

Exactly. Like others, I was more interested in the fact that she didn't quite fit in with her nerdiness and lack of posturing. All of the people I know who haven't followed the wearable technology arena for the past decade weren't like "OMG, she put a Nikon in a Juicy sweatshirt! There is no spoon? What?"

I think your fellow expert TV watchers were more likely to say, "huh, nice contestant angle" and move on, IMHO.

#39

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Posted Dec 9, 2005 @ 5:29 PM

Whenever I see her name, I get TMBG's "Ana Ng" stuck in my head, not that that's a bad thing.

Anyway, boy howdy is she geeky. I'm surprised she's at RISD instead of RPI. This girl screams "technical institute." I like how she's trying to mesh science and fashion, and in many ways, more materials than not of the 20th and the 21st centuries have aimed do just that, but I think her goals are too lofty and far too gimmicky. When you combine a hoodie with a camera, one of the two will suffer greatly quality-wise IMO. It's a quirky idea, a novelty you may see in Wired or some equally insufferable "tech-style" mag, but it's not reality.

Also, she cannot be so meek and timid if she wants to succeed in a cutthroat industry! Diana's cool, though--she seems very nice and easy-going.

#40

SFSciolist

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Posted Dec 9, 2005 @ 8:12 PM

It is difficult to see how combining science with clothing prevents one from being “innovative” just because some techies may have done something similar in the past. That’s like saying there can be only so many artists in the world and that everyone coming along afterwards cannot possibly have any original ideas.

The early wearable technologies--like the original 1908 Model T automobiles--were pretty clunky and primarily emphasized functionality over style. We’re now at the point where a designer can create aesthetically pleasing “wearables” that are not overshadowed by the underlying technology. While one designer may use the technological innovation of wrinkle-free cotton, someone like Diana may choose instead to incorporate the technology of a flexible circuit board.

Diana Eng is truly the designer to watch on this show.

#41

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Posted Dec 9, 2005 @ 10:07 PM

See, I think her talent could go beyond gimmicky tech fashion stuff. She could be this season's Austin for me, in that she has a point of view and she has a lot of untapped potential, but she's a little too far out in her own little world. Both of them need to learn to take a challenge, start as far out as possible, and then rein it in. They paint in broad strokes, which can read as gimmicky and trite and forced. I think Austin will definitely become a better designer when he stops essentially copying vintage sillouettes rather than adapting them more for HIS vision in the present. Haven't seen enough of Diana yet to say the same, but its possible.

#42

ella ventic

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 2:09 AM

Okay, sign me up as a passenger on the Diana fanmobile. (She's a nerd! She's *ONE OF US!!!!*)

The thing that impressed me most about her was that she puts an element of pure design even into her gimmickry. The magnets were used, not just in place of ordinary closures, but to make a dual silhouette for a truly unique dress. Nothing else could have done it, I think. I mean, can you imagine having to try to button or even snap something at your lower back while on the runway? (Oh, I just got a great mental image of that fashion show. There would be models flying into the audience every which way.)

And the camera jacket! Yeah, cameras in hoods are nothing new. And heart monitors in clothes are (I assume, because it seems very practical) nothing new either. But to link the two so the camera takes pictures of the thing that made your heart race... Practical? Not at all. Wicked cool? You betcha. And to me, that's art. :)

...And it's really too bad that I don't think she's going to make it that far due to her totally typical and (in my view) awesome geekish personality.

#43

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 2:29 AM

I also think it's important to remember that she won't have her technological goodies to play with in the challenges on the show. Unless she makes it to the final three, she'll have to prove herself without the 'gimmickry'.

Now, gadgets aside, Diana has an interesting point of view, the cutting and sewing skills to back up her ideas, and an excellent imagination. Also, while she's shy in dealing with people, she doesn't seem to get easily flustered with deadlines and odd materials. I think if she can find a way to break her shy shell just a little, she could be a serious stealth candidate.

I love her geeky attitude, but more than that, I love what she can do with a piece of fabric. I would absolutely wear her coral reef collar.

#44

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 11:23 AM

I like Diana, much like others, because she really has a unique perspective and in a field full of fashion divas, she sure stands out. And I agree that she's a cool customer. She's insecure about herself - but not about her designs or her skills. And because of her philosophy, she is less likely to choke given a weird project. However, she might choke when they throw her a more mainstream project - such as the Banana Republic dress from last season.

Still, I like her and hope she goes far. I think she will, given that the early rounds usually eliminate the lazy & stupid, and those attempting something interesting, whether sucessful or not, tend to stick around. She's interesting.

#45

Fungus Amongus

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 1:32 PM

I find myself agreeing with peachfuzz.

I really don't think it's simply a matter of a luddite public gushing "oh, neat!" and being all flabbergasted.


The thing is that not only does she bring awareness of a possible new scope of research and design to the general public, (maybe the researchers and their families already knew about the possibilities, but I and all of my friends were equally stunned with her work, and we are all higher educated metropolitain folks who live in Manhattan), but, like Emmett, she provides a crucial counterpoint to so many of the people that we were briefly exposed to this season, and the ones who failed miserably in the past season. The counterpoint is a focus, and a mode of planning. Like MK and the Garcia Lady said, it takes more than 8 hours to plan a piece of wearable art. Just like installation artists, I feel that there's room for technology, there's room for creativity, and there's room to make one seem like the other.

At any rate, Science Girl, (that's what they'll call her!), is my pick for 3rd place.

#46

Inferia

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 3:29 PM

It is difficult to see how combining science with clothing prevents one from being “innovative” just because some techies may have done something similar in the past. That’s like saying there can be only so many artists in the world and that everyone coming along afterwards cannot possibly have any original ideas.

The early wearable technologies--like the original 1908 Model T automobiles--were pretty clunky and primarily emphasized functionality over style. We’re now at the point where a designer can create aesthetically pleasing “wearables” that are not overshadowed by the underlying technology. While one designer may use the technological innovation of wrinkle-free cotton, someone like Diana may choose instead to incorporate the technology of a flexible circuit board.

Diana Eng is truly the designer to watch on this show.

Hmm well, that's not what I mean when I said the things about innovative. Unless Diana can come up with a flexible circuit board that can withstand a regular washing machine or chemicals from a dry cleaner (or frankly regular wear and tear), I think most of her designs still belong in a material science laboratory. What am I trying to say is that, and these questions will get asked even for a school project is that if you want create something that is usable, it has to withstand standard wear-and-tear. If the product you come with is just "cool looking" or a "cool concept" if it doesn't really work then that product is still in its very beginning stage. There would be a long way to go before it actually becomes anything usable let alone runway ready. I am no knocking her imaginations, imagination is the first step in science, but there's a long way to go from imagination to viable product, something that can't be done in 24 hours (or I'd be out of a job). Chances are for this competition, Diana has to rely much more on her artistic side than her scientific side. I'm not sure how far she can go with that.

Edited by Inferia, Dec 10, 2005 @ 3:34 PM.


#47

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 3:37 PM

I can see the label: DO NOT IMMERSE.

Or the slogan: "Unplug. Unfug. Eng."

I guess it's like an electric blanket. Hey, does anyone use those anymore? When you see them at thrift stores, they're all lumpy-bumpy. I guess wires are softer and more flexible, but they still have problems. "Hey, my shorts shorted!". Wonder if she's does any vibrating pleasure pants?

#48

Inferia

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 3:47 PM

I guess it's like an electric blanket. Hey, does anyone use those anymore? When you see them at thrift stores, they're all lumpy-bumpy. I guess wires are softer and more flexible, but they still have problems. "Hey, my shorts shorted!".

Actually a company came to my school last year talking about electric blankets. Well wearable electronics in general. They've made the wires thin enough to be barely noticable (so the blanket is just like a regular blanket). I don't remember the company or how they made it work, but it was pretty cool. The thing is the incorporation of these technologies take a longtime and reqires a lot of testings (and not to mention money). I'm not sure how a 1 hour tv show that give contestants a day or two to make their clothes is going to allow for anything that's both aesthetically pleasing and viable. Chances are, the clothing will come up gimmicky rather than really something aww inspiring.

#49

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 3:50 PM

Doesn't it still pose the same long-term low-level radiation threat?

So now was it Apprentice did the wearable clothing challenge? And PR as mentioned, had the futurist challenge. Where else have I seen wearable electronics? And who was it that came to your school? I wonder if those folks inspired Diane.

eta - Hey Cheese Nip - that was a job I had once! Spraying T-shirts with that dye. Ick.

Edited by Sharpy, Dec 10, 2005 @ 3:55 PM.


#50

Cheese Nip

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 3:52 PM

If she starts going all Hypercolor on me, I am going to throw my champagne at the tv.

#51

Inferia

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 3:57 PM

Doesn't it still pose the same long-term low-level radiation threat?

So now was it Apprentice did the wearable clothing challenge? And PR as mentioned, had the futurist challenge. Where else have I seen wearable electronics? And who was it that came to your school? I wonder if those folks inspired Diane.

I am not sure if it will pose any radiation threat, there probably needs to be research on it. I can't think of their name, I just remembered someone in my class did a senior design project on it. If I see the professor who taught the class I will ask him who was it that they worked with. I don't think it's folks who inspired Diana, there are lots of companies and research groups who are currently working on this. Any one of them could spark an interest.

#52

paradig_m

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 4:10 PM

Doesn't it still pose the same long-term low-level radiation threat?


Electric blankets haven't been proven to pose a threat to human health. And most studies have found little to no correlation between EMF and cancer, and there are often far too many variables to note what has caused illness when illness occurs. Plus, the earth itself is a huge EMF generator, and there are wires in virtually all household appliances, your walls, etc., etc. But electric blankets do not generate heat via EMF radiation anyhow.

That said, I agree with Inferia. There's a big, huge cognitive gap between show-ready and consumer-ready. Diana's work can easily go the science fair route, or it can attempt to integrate technology with wearable, aesthetically pleasing clothes, but the latter will take much longer to develop. The public ultimately does not buy goods just because they look cool IF (big if) there's no true underlying function and especially if it's cost-prohibitive. To go back to the camera-hoodie, most people would rather have a comfortable, stylish hoodie and a quality camera rather than the two combined. That combination is just not something people need or desire, though it may give them pause for a moment, like, "Oh, cool, look at that." But there's no need to purchase such an item.

Edited by paradig_m, Dec 10, 2005 @ 4:30 PM.


#53

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 4:33 PM

Thank you Inferia and paradig_m. That is more along the lines of what I should have said in my post (which wasn't directed towards any of the members of the board at all, so please don't take it that way).

And exactly, she won't have access to her tech-y stuff on the show, but I still like what she did without it (such as the dress ... even though the bottom was a bit unfinished for my taste, I liked the flow and movement of the dress).

#54

Fungus Amongus

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 5:34 PM

Good points all, and I totally agree after watching the show a second time that she'll need to work on her artistry to stay in the game, not to mention excellent reasoning behind Inferia's 'wear and tear' philosophy, (it needs to be wearable/cleanable in order to be considered fashion). But aside from all of that, I feel that Diana has the most to learn from the competition, and I am oftentimes immediately swayed by the nice-guys who learn the most. (Bowling Moms, Rafe, Kahlen, etc.) Not that they ever win, of course.

Edited by Fungus Amongus, Dec 10, 2005 @ 5:35 PM.


#55

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 8:38 PM

The public ultimately does not buy goods just because they look cool IF (big if) there's no true underlying function and especially if it's cost-prohibitive. To go back to the camera-hoodie, most people would rather have a comfortable, stylish hoodie and a quality camera rather than the two combined. That combination is just not something people need or desire, though it may give them pause for a moment, like, "Oh, cool, look at that." But there's no need to purchase such an item.


In a few years, personal high-quality video cameras will likely become a common permanent accessory. It might be a video cell phone with a multi-terabyte flash drive that the user can turn on before walking down a dark street. It might be a camera built into clothing that automatically transmits to a base station after being triggered by stress of the wearer.

Telephones in cars have been around for decades. However, it took the development of the cellular system to make portable telephones affordable for the rest of us.

The rich have their bodyguards and gated communities. Soon we will see a democratizing of security so that 24/7 personal protection will be affordable to the middle class.

There will be no arguments about "Big Brother" because the government will not be operating these cameras. Debates over whether citizens should be allowed to carry firearms for protection could become largely academic because personal cameras may be more effective in preventing crime.

And if the cameras also look cool to wear, so much the better.

Interesting times ahead.

Edited by SFSciolist, Dec 10, 2005 @ 8:39 PM.


#56

paradig_m

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Posted Dec 10, 2005 @ 9:05 PM

In a few years, personal high-quality video cameras will likely become a common permanent accessory. It might be a video cell phone with a multi-terabyte flash drive that the user can turn on before walking down a dark street. It might be a camera built into clothing that automatically transmits to a base station after being triggered by stress of the wearer.


I don't think this is true. Flash drives will not approach multi-terabyte anytime soon. Flash memory is (and will continue to be) prohibitively expensive. Arguably small by today's standards, 4GB flash devices are still well outside the range of affordability for the average consumer. Even accepting Moore's law, we will not see "multi-terabyte" drives in an affordable range for twenty years.

(Also, the development of the cellular system did not affect the affordability of 'car phones.' Affordability in car phones was obtained by the development of DSP technology and lithium ion/nickel-metal hydride batteries.)

Technology has little to do with style or fashion. Fashionphiles find technology fashionable because it is often mistakenly viewed as rare and elusive. But since there's truly nothing magical or special about technology, there are certain things it simply cannot or should not do. I think Diana will succeed if she looks outside technology for motivation and focuses more on aesthetics, pure and simple.

#57

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Posted Dec 11, 2005 @ 1:25 AM

Okay I love her -- People! She made a hat AND a purse and a really detailed and interesting top AND a skirt for the clothes off your back challenge. No crying about time, no wondering about how to thread a sewing machine -- just got it done and done and done well. Sobdrae couldn't even finish his ugly jeans dress. Good lord talk about being able to outfit a family of seven and then do charity work downtown. Color me impressed. Although she isn't my favorite (Chloe has that sewed up) I do want her around for a long time.

Edited by Adetunji, Dec 11, 2005 @ 3:32 AM.


#58

Sharpy

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Posted Dec 11, 2005 @ 2:58 AM

I hope we finally get the flying car. We've been promised those for a long time. Where are they?

#59

Twistie

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Posted Dec 11, 2005 @ 12:50 PM

So with you Adetunji.

Diana did so much with her outfit, with so little fuss about what it meant to her or how little time she had to work in. I, for one, can't wait to see what she turns out next. As I've said before, I could really see her working out to be the stealth candidate who squeaks into the final three. Will she? I don't know. But I'm looking forward to finding out. And once she's off the show, I plan to watch her future career with interest.

She's definitely not a one-trick pony.

#60

Fungus Amongus

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Posted Dec 11, 2005 @ 1:37 PM

Sharpy says:

I hope we finally get the flying car. We've been promised those for a long time. Where are they?


Hilarious. When the 'Chitty, Chitty, Bang, Bang' challenge comes along, Diana's gonna be made a project manager. Against Zulema or Loopy or someone crazy. It'll be AWESOME.