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The Pros and Cons of Closed Captioning


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#481

Glass Ocean

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Posted Jan 4, 2012 @ 9:18 PM

There was character using some British slang

how hard can it be to translate ENGLISH on an American program??


That's the main reason I want CC -- to be able to understand the shows on BBCA. Between the thick dialects and the slang, I'm straining to hear and to grok it. If the characters are whispering or mumbling, I'm done for. Yet I loved the British New Wave films of the 60's and 70's, but maybe the theater speakers were just LOUDER.
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#482

Kosmonaut

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Posted Jan 25, 2012 @ 4:08 PM

A character on Being Human this week was named Boner, which made for some interesting closed captioning bits. ("Boner speaking. Indistinctive.") That right there is reason enough to convince me to keep mine on for a while.

I am twelve.
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#483

Dawnydiesel92

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Posted Jan 29, 2012 @ 2:59 PM

We use CC all the time. We got in the habit as we watch a lot of BBC programming and/or shows with thick accents and now we tend to use it all the time. Plus, we have young kids and if not for CC, we'd never watch a whole show with the rugrats running around being all noisy.

Anyway, I think my favorite CC mistake is from Gilmore Girls. Luke is happy (him and Lorelai got engaged the night before) and he made blueberry pancakes. A customer says "I didn't order blueberry pancakes" and he replies "Antioxidants are on the house today". CC says "Any accidents are on the house today". Makes me giggle every time.
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#484

Jilly Copper

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Posted Jan 31, 2012 @ 8:30 PM

I remember I once had the TV on mute during the commercials and the CC was on. I wasn't paying attention to the commercials, but I looked up at one point and I saw a closed caption for Pfizer faucets appearing over an ad for an action movie. Apparently the Pfizer commercial had ended and the CC just stayed on the screen. But my first thought upon seeing it was, "Whoa! This is pretty intense for a commercial for faucets!"
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#485

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Posted Feb 14, 2012 @ 6:20 PM

I was trying to put the Baby Nice to sleep so I put CC on so I could catch up on my DVR shows. I have to say for the first time in a long time, the CC was on the money. It actually made sense and no misspellings.
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#486

backhometome

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Posted Mar 3, 2012 @ 12:57 PM

I love CC to the point where I cant watch TV/movies without it. I was born deaf and wear hearing aids and I can hear pretty well for the most part but Im horrible with accents and whispering. I mostly use CC so I can catch all the dialogue. Yeah, sometimes it misspells stuff and it comes before the actor actually speaks but I do find it more helpful than not.

My sister hates it though and cant stand it. She says the CC distracts her too much. But if she wants to watch something with me I usually get my way. Lol.
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#487

carolinagirl63

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Posted Mar 3, 2012 @ 9:41 PM

I love CC to the point where I cant watch TV/movies without it. I was born deaf and wear hearing aids and I can hear pretty well for the most part but Im horrible with accents and whispering.


I'm mildly hearing impaired so I only use CC on TV and DVDs. CC is usually pretty good. One of the worst shows is Chelsea Lately. Sometimes I think a drunk Chelsea is doing the captioning.
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#488

fangums

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Posted Mar 5, 2012 @ 8:08 PM

Yesterday I rewound three times trying to catch the last line in a Law & Order episode and finally turned on the CC. Mr. Fang clearly thought I was nuts, but it was going to drive me crazy not knowing what had been said (mostly just because I wouldn't know; not that I thought I was missing some brilliant utterance), so I was very grateful to have that option to fall back on.

And even though he made fun of me, I guarantee you in the not-so-distant future I catch him doing the same thing.

Edited by fangums, Mar 5, 2012 @ 8:08 PM.

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#489

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Posted Mar 16, 2012 @ 10:08 PM

On Jeopardy, the CC always gives the answer before the contestant speaks. I think it's because the camera moves off the contestant as soon as they speak, so in order to sync it, they have to put the caption up before the words are spoken. But it totally ruins the timing for viewers, who now have to think faster than the contestants.
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#490

cosmom

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Posted May 21, 2012 @ 7:39 PM

I was trying to put the Baby Nice to sleep so I put CC on

That is why I first started using it and it quickly became the norm in my house whether anyone was trying to sleep or not. I think it helped my kids learn to spell as an added bonus (although spelling is not always CC's forte). At this point, my kids automatically add on the captions when watching a movie on dvd although if we have company they do ask if the others find it distracting.

What makes me nuts is when the CC is lagging behind the spoken dialogue for no apparent reason and when they place the captions anywhere but the bottom of the screen. Having the words floating over someone's face or the action that is relevant to the story is maddening. At those times, CC goes off. I used to watch some shows with my Dad and he needs the CC now his hearing is slipping, but the action invasive CC drives me away.
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#491

Kev

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Posted May 22, 2012 @ 12:57 AM

I hate it when the CC scrolls. I understand for things like live events but it's just so hard for me to keep up with it.
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#492

braggtastic

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Posted Nov 26, 2012 @ 12:47 PM

This is not exactly closed captioning, but I think it's more than just a nitpick. Due to some networks having their logo on screen at all times, subtitles are not always legible. I would think it would be the same thing with closed captioning. I wonder if anyone who watches PBS in NY experiences this.

I tried watching Armadillo, a POV documentary about a Danish military unit in Afghanistan. There were many times the subtitles couldn't be read because they were partially blocked by that PBS logo & the word Thirteen in big block letters that comes out over 1/3 of the way across the screen. Maybe it depends on how large a screen you have, and mine isn't huge. Anyway, even though the font is block letters with only the outline in white, it makes reading other type very difficult.
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#493

cosmom

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Posted Mar 6, 2013 @ 6:12 PM

When CC is on and I mute the volume, the closed captions stop as well. They only stop for 30 seconds or so. It doesn't matter if I hit mute on the tv remote or on the cable remote - same thing happens.
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#494

braggtastic

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Posted Mar 7, 2013 @ 1:15 PM

That's weird. I have the opposite issue. If I mute my TV, the closed captions immediately come on & I don't know how to turn them off.
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#495

Bastet Esq

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Posted Mar 8, 2013 @ 12:56 AM

Maybe "on when muted" is the default CC setting on your TV (rather than off, which is the usual default in my experience), but if you can find the menu screen that governs CC you should be able to change that. I have my TVs set to display CC when I mute the volume, so if I'm muting in order to take a call I can opt to half listen to the caller while I continue to follow the program. But if you select whatever phrase your TV uses for always off, you won't see CC anymore when you hit mute.

Edited by Bastet Esq, Mar 8, 2013 @ 12:58 AM.

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#496

paulvdb

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Posted Mar 8, 2013 @ 3:37 AM

This is not exactly closed captioning, but I think it's more than just a nitpick. Due to some networks having their logo on screen at all times, subtitles are not always legible. I would think it would be the same thing with closed captioning. I wonder if anyone who watches PBS in NY experiences this.

I know this is an old post, but nobody has answered it yet so I'll post about it anyway. The subtitles for foreign languages are almost always hardcoded in the actual video that is delivered by the production company to the broadcaster. When the broadcaster overlays their logo and other graphics they cover those subtitles which means that you can't read (part of) those subtitles.

Closed captioning is broadcast as a seperate stream in your television signal and your tv decodes it and overlays it on the video. This means that channel logos and other graphics don't cover closed captioning. The same goes for other subtitles that are not hardcoded into the picture such as teletext, dvb, dvd and bluray subtitles. Of course those last two don't have channel logos anyway and the first two are not used in North America as far as I know but they are used in Europe and maybe other parts of the world.
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#497

OSM Mom

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Posted May 1, 2013 @ 10:14 AM

I've been watching MASH DVDs with a hearing impaired friend and we've had the closed captioning on. I've noticed that they've made quite a few mistakes on the closed captioning, such as leaving words out and getting words wrong, that is not captioning the word the character said. Why? I can see mistakes being made ob live TV, but not on a DVD. Is this normal? I don't usually watch TV with the captioning on.
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#498

OSM Mom

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Posted May 1, 2013 @ 10:14 AM

I've been watching MASH DVDs with a hearing impaired friend and we've had the closed captioning on. I've noticed that they've made quite a few mistakes on the closed captioning, such as leaving words out and getting words wrong, that is not captioning the word the character said. Why? I can see mistakes being made ob live TV, but not on a DVD. Is this normal? I don't usually watch TV with the captioning on.
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#499

OSM Mom

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Posted May 1, 2013 @ 10:15 AM

I've been watching MASH DVDs with a hearing impaired friend and we've had the closed captioning on. I've noticed that they've made quite a few mistakes on the closed captioning, such as leaving words out and getting words wrong, that is not captioning the word the character said. Why? I can see mistakes being made ob live TV, but not on a DVD. Is this normal? I don't usually watch TV with the captioning on.

I've been watching MASH DVDs with a hearing impaired friend and we've had the closed captioning on. I've noticed that they've made quite a few mistakes on the closed captioning, such as leaving words out and getting words wrong, that is not captioning the word the character said. Why? I can see mistakes being made ob live TV, but not on a DVD. Is this normal? I don't usually watch TV with the captioning on.
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#500

EndoKE

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Posted May 1, 2013 @ 10:51 AM

I watch Mad Men with the closed captioning on and when a character says "shit" the captioning reads "sh**."

Once when I was watching The Shield, they bleeped out the word "fuck" even though the character said it.

Edited by EndoKE, May 1, 2013 @ 10:52 AM.

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#501

Bastet Esq

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Posted May 1, 2013 @ 2:16 PM

OSM Mom, I had a similar experience recently; I rarely use CC, but I wound up watching a couple of DVDs with it on, and I noticed many lines had been changed. It seemed to be done to shorten the dialogue in order to get the gist across in one or two lines of text, so the CC could keep up with the scene (rather than the CC still showing the dialogue of character A, when on screen we've already moved on to character B and such).
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#502

OSM Mom

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Posted May 2, 2013 @ 2:48 PM

Ah. Ok. Well, that makes sense I guess, as far as keeping up with the scenes. But there's still no excuse for getting words just plain wrong on a DVD.
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#503

paulvdb

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Posted May 3, 2013 @ 1:48 AM

Would they make the effort to do the caption all over again for a dvd release? Or would they just use the same captions that were used when the episodes first aired on tv?
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#504

Runningwild

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Posted Jun 13, 2013 @ 12:34 PM

My favorite CC mistake was during a football game and they talked about the great 'Dick butt kiss'. I find I don't have to use the CC watching older shows like MASH or The Brady Bunch. But on a lot of the newer shows the characters talk so fast or the dialogue overlaps and I can't hear it. I also use it for accents (such as Daphne on Frasier) and reality shows like Survivor where they do a lot of whispering.
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#505

ParadoxLost

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Posted Jun 13, 2013 @ 4:42 PM

I think CC is going to be useful for the Daily Show while Jon Stewart is off filming a movie.  It is pretty bad with names and the American guests (not to mention on a 15 second delay) but is perfectly translates John Oliver's English accent when he throws out a word so incomprehensible that the guest says huh?


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#506

Trini Girl

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Posted Jan 5, 2014 @ 9:06 PM

Sometimes they do the closed captioning before the final edit of an episode, so sometimes you can read a previous draft of a line/scene (while the hearing the final dialog). The changes can be really interesting.
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#507

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Posted Jan 6, 2014 @ 1:56 PM

I experienced that with Star trek, sometimes it says what should be said but the lines were clearly cut from the final episode, Since no one is talking. Its interesting to see :).


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#508

B2H

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Posted Jan 6, 2014 @ 5:13 PM

I have started using the closed captioning because, sometimes, the background music on shows is just so distracting that I end up missing stuff.

 

In any case, there is frankly no reason for a taped show to not have faithful captioning.  Something like a football game, which is live action, or local news programming, I can understand, but reality shows, talk shows, made for TV shows should not have a disconnect between the spoken and written dialog.  The closed captioning should be coming from scripts or transcripts for most of broadcast TV.

 

I have seen multiple times where the closed captioning just plain stops.  No particular reason, just stops.  Then suddenly there's two or three minutes of rapid display of closed captioning on the screen that no one could possibly read because it's gotten backed up.

 

There's just no excuse.


Edited by B2H, Jan 6, 2014 @ 5:14 PM.

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#509

blueray1

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Posted Jan 10, 2014 @ 9:35 AM

Interesting enough I was at a restaurant who had it on during a hockey game. Who ever did those did a great job because they were keeping up with everything that was said even though most of it was "player A" passes it to "player B" and it is intercepted all happened in like 10 seconds.


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#510

hjohnson

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Posted Jan 28, 2014 @ 10:18 PM

I was watching the news at the gym today and while the story was about a mother and son dying of asphyxiation as the title card said, the CC apparently thought it was "a fixed united nations." I was so thrown off at trying to figure out what the UN had to do with the story I almost fell off the treadmill. 


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