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#1951

methespy

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Posted Oct 9, 2010 @ 6:22 PM

Trial and Retribution is another possibility for you, Writing Wrongs.


I love Trial and Retribution. The first series, with Rhys Ifans, was insanely good. Some of the later series were a bit silly, but in all, it's one of my favorites. Does anyone know if they will be making more?

There are some really good one offs from the UK. The Unforgiven was outstanding. I also thought Five Daughters was pretty good. If you can get your hands on either of those, you might really enjoy them. I'm about to start Red Riding which I've heard good things about.

Edited by methespy, Oct 9, 2010 @ 6:24 PM.

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#1952

dustylil

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Posted Oct 9, 2010 @ 9:46 PM

Some of the later series were a bit silly, but in all, it's one of my favorites. Does anyone know if they will be making more?

Some of the plotpoints in a couple of the later ones certainly did beggar belief:) But overall quite a gripping show.

It is my understanding that there are 22 individual episodes (shown as two, three or four parters), with the last one being released in early 2009. The ITV website doesn't provide any information about any new episodes.

I don't know if the last few have been aired on commercial or public television in North America. I think I have only seen the ones up to Episode 17.
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#1953

hlisy

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Posted Oct 10, 2010 @ 8:36 PM

Trying to watch 'Wallander' due to the wonderful Rupert Graves, but I'm feeling depressed just watching it. Can't someone be happy in this show?
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#1954

HobokenMartha

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Posted Oct 10, 2010 @ 9:07 PM

Oh my. Me too on both counts. Graves is wonderful, but the Scandinavian gloom is...palpable.
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#1955

Cress

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Posted Oct 10, 2010 @ 9:26 PM

Why is Rupert suddenly in all the Mystery series lately? Lewis, Wallander, and he'll be in Sherlock soon. I guess it's just 'cause he's awesome.

Edited by Cress, Oct 10, 2010 @ 9:29 PM.

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#1956

JudyObscure

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Posted Oct 11, 2010 @ 6:05 AM

Rupert Graves is probably the reason I finally made it through a Wallander before falling asleep.

I know Kenneth Branaugh is considered a great actor but I just look at him and wonder; Emma Thompson and Helena Bonham Carter both fell in love with this guy? Or maybe it's because he is such a great actor that we watch him playing depressed and feel ourselves sinking into the mire.

Edited by JudyObscure, Oct 11, 2010 @ 6:06 AM.

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#1957

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Posted Oct 11, 2010 @ 9:22 AM

I fell asleep in the middle of one Wallander last year. I'm curious now, and there's not much else on Sunday nights. Even though I find it interesting in pats I doubt I'll be die-hard, giddy "Oh yay, new Wallander!" anytime soon. (Personally I like the desolate scenery--moody, atmospheric, and I guess I've read one too many Brontes because the windswept moor-equivalent appeals.) I'm not enough of a mystery buff to say if the puzzles are well-crafted or whatnot, but I like the matter-of-fact professionalism of the squad. And I'm intrigued by Chancellor Gorkon with the old-timer's disease. So it's a time killer.

But Lewis geek-out: one of the choirs from Oxford (Christ Church Cathedral Choir) will be in my area touring next spring. My first thought on that announcement was "English choir! Oxford! Lewis!" Plus, on hearing that some trumpet soloist is doing a Hummel concerto in an upcoming concert I immediately think of the audition in the pilot. Barrington Pheloung can be proud, he's effectively wormed Lewis/Morse into my classical music free-association.
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#1958

Fabrisse

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Posted Oct 11, 2010 @ 10:45 AM

I know Kenneth Branaugh is considered a great actor but I just look at him and wonder; Emma Thompson and Helena Bonham Carter both fell in love with this guy? Or maybe it's because he is such a great actor that we watch him playing depressed and feel ourselves sinking into the mire.


Branagh is probably THE stage actor of his generation. I've sat in the back row of the top balcony and could have sworn he was whispering in my ear. John Gielgud in his autobiography said he and Peggy Ashcroft thought the "kill Claudio" scene in Much Ado About Nothing was supposed to be played straight: neither Beatrice's "Kill Claudio" nor Benedick's "Not for the wide world, madam" should get a laugh. He'd always failed. I'd seen three productions, including Derek Jacobi's, before I saw Branagh and Samantha Bond in the roles. Branagh didn't get a laugh, and that scene was almost embarrassingly moving in its revelations of love and pain.

All that said, I have a hard time with Wallander. It's so depressing.
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#1959

hlisy

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Posted Oct 11, 2010 @ 10:58 AM

But Lewis geek-out: one of the choirs from Oxford (Christ Church Cathedral Choir) will be in my area touring next spring. My first thought on that announcement was "English choir! Oxford! Lewis!" Plus, on hearing that some trumpet soloist is doing a Hummel concerto in an upcoming concert I immediately think of the audition in the pilot. Barrington Pheloung can be proud, he's effectively wormed Lewis/Morse into my classical music free-association.

Oh cool. Fellow geekout! I saw the Kings College Choir in Cambridge and they were fantastic.

KB is a pretty good actor but Wallander reminds me of those bleak foreign films in black and white where everyone is depressed. Some people like that but for me, I need a litte lightness every once in a while.

Rupert Graves is one of those actors like George Clooney and Paul Newman who seem to grow more attractive as they age.
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#1960

Artistictype

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Posted Oct 12, 2010 @ 11:09 AM

The episode description of Sunday's show included 'and Wallander falls into a deep depression.'
And this is different...how?

I'm just curious about his leave from the force. When he shows up back at the station, everyone is shocked at his appearance. His boss/captain(?) says he'd need a medical exam before being reinstated. She comments that she can see he's sweating and shaking. But he simply says 'I'm fine.' and she gives him his gun back. The hell?
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#1961

CdaTVguy

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Posted Oct 12, 2010 @ 2:20 PM

After Lewis, I tried to watch Wallander. But the show ruined my appetite when I watched at supper time. And I fell asleep when I watched that before bed time. The show the plot of last night ep was not bad. It was Wllander who turn me away. If it was a movie, he was ok. But TV show ....

he is such a great actor that we watch him playing depressed and feel ourselves sinking into the mire.

. But it is a TV show that should entertain the us.

And mine you, there are fans out there. According to the PBS discussion board, there are a few 1000 views of the show.
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#1962

methespy

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Posted Oct 12, 2010 @ 4:36 PM

I enjoy Wallander immensely. I think it's one of the better shows on TV. Not every show can have a light and airy tone. I enjoy Lewis but sometimes find the light and airy Oxford whimsy to be a bit much. I find Wallander's muted colors, at times bleak landscape, and themes of depression and angst to be more realistic. I think it's just really well done. Mileage varies.
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#1963

Cress

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Posted Oct 12, 2010 @ 7:11 PM

His boss/captain(?) says he'd need a medical exam before being reinstated. She comments that she can see he's sweating and shaking. But he simply says 'I'm fine.' and she gives him his gun back. The hell?


I know, right? And he was apparently on medication that he threw away in the trash (only to dig out later). I would have thought that she'd only give him his badge back at first, and not give the gun before a psych evaluation. That wasn't realistic at all.

methespy, there's nothing wrong with you enjoying it. Many times in the past, I kept wondering if there was something wrong with me for not being able to enjoy it, despite its critical acclaim. I've enjoyed incredibly dark series before--Dexter--for example, and seen plenty of movies with depressing themes, disturbing crimes, and abusive backstories too.

But Wallander somehow rubs me the wrong way. I found this episode incredibly slow moving, and too much dialogue was whispered and tense. Also, there would be no logical explanation for things, like the boss giving his gun back, and why Wallander hadn't kept up paying his electricity and phone bills at his flat, and he didn't immediately try to set those things back up once he returned. I feel every moment as if Wallander's on the verge of suicide, and there's no change, whatever happens on the case.

The solution of the mystery felt more like a bittersweet victory for that ex-cop security guard, getting to feel like he was a hero, even if he couldn't be re-instated. I felt way more emotional tug for him than I did for Wallander. I don't think that's the way I'm supposed to feel, with the main character striking me as obscure and lifeless. I've stopped hoping that I could ever enjoy Wallander, no matter what the guest star.

Edited by Cress, Oct 12, 2010 @ 7:12 PM.

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#1964

hlisy

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Posted Oct 12, 2010 @ 8:13 PM

methespy-don't feel bad, on the PBS site there's a whole thread dedicate to Wallander, and my parents love the show for the same realism that you talked about.
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#1965

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Posted Oct 12, 2010 @ 11:20 PM

This last episode was probably my least favorite and I can understand why this particular episode bothered some. I thought tbd giving back of the gun was odd too. But Rupert Graves was in the episode being handsome as usual, so it still gets a pass from me. Rupert Graves makes anything watchable. Handsome.
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#1966

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Posted Oct 13, 2010 @ 3:06 PM

Really liking Midsomer Murders. Is it just me or do the English have an unhealthy interest in incest? Almost every series I've watched has an episode about it. You don't see that too much in the States. Also, I've noticed that they will actually show people putting a gun in their mouths and then (simulating of course) blowing their heads off. It's kind of shocking.
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#1967

attica finch

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Posted Oct 14, 2010 @ 9:31 AM

I am now caught up with Wallender, and I'm going to come down on the 'I like 'em!' side of the argument. Granted, I nodded off when I tried to watch this past week's during the broadcast, but when I sat down (well-rested) to watch the dvr, I was quite pulled in. So maybe watching this series has certain viewing prerequisites. As to the plots themselves, they are certainly more procedural and way less labyrinthine than those of Lewis; they move relentlessly forward rather than circle around and back. I do wish the camera work would pan out a bit more and more often, with all those wide open Swedish spaces, they have an awful lot of claustrophobic shot-choices, even outdoors.

And in shallow news, Branagh is rocking the grey hair. (Or blond going grey.) Now if only he'd shave...
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#1968

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Posted Oct 14, 2010 @ 9:44 AM

I haven't read the books, but from what I understand, most of the complaints about the Wallander character are actually key aspects of the character from the books. I think the series writers are be true to the books, which means Wallander is unkept and morose. We'll have to see KB shaved and smiling in some other setting, I'm afraid.
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#1969

attica finch

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Posted Oct 14, 2010 @ 2:23 PM

I take your point, jenniferes, but, imo, there are limits to how true to the source material is strictly necessary. I mean, Bob Woodward looks NOTHING like Robert Redford, and my enjoyment of All the Presidents' Men was actually enhanced by that particular departure from source, you know? Eye candy is not begrudged, is my point. ;)
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#1970

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Posted Oct 15, 2010 @ 12:48 PM

Thanks, Namaste, for the Oxford Experience link - will have to check it out....

British shows to try: I like both variations of Dagliesh, Roy Marsden and Martin Shaw, but they are different from each other - Shaw is a lot more "poet" like than Marsden. Also a long, long time ago, they did some Dick Francis books, The Racing Game, which I remember at the time as being wonderful but have probably not held up (this was the late 70s - early 80s).

The Carmichael Lord Peter adaptations for Masterpiece Theatre (which apparently led to the Mystery! series) are back out in new DVD versions - I loved those, but I am not a Sayers purist since I've never read the books. I know many fans of the books don't like Carmichael but I think they're great fun.

And Rumpole of the Bailey, which are in my Netflix queue to see again - those were terrific.

Law & Order UK is American L&O translated - at least the first season is rewrites of early season L&O. Which, if you're a fan of those years, is fun to watch to see how they've changed and updated the plots.
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#1971

hlisy

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Posted Oct 16, 2010 @ 8:28 AM

Have a question about "The Great and the Good" episode of Lewis. Did Hathaway and Lewis ever find out why Oswald Cooper sent Lewis the key and note about who killed his wife? On the DVD, the last scene has the pair sifting through the papers in the hidden room and Lewis coming across the newspaper article about Val. It then ends quite abruptly and the credits role. So I'm assuming that Cooper was just messing with Lewis. Correct?
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#1972

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Posted Oct 16, 2010 @ 10:47 PM

hlisy I took it that Cooper was just messing with Lewis as well - that Cooper didn't know anything beyond the newspaper clippings he had saved. However, I thought the key that Lewis was sent opened the house across the street - so I thought the letter had a double meaning - maybe I missed something?

Since protecting those you love was intertwined in this story, I thought some of Lewis' reaction was due to his inability to protect his wife - unfounded as that may be.
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#1973

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Posted Oct 17, 2010 @ 11:07 PM

Thought tonight's Wallander was outstanding. Kenneth Branagh was wonderful. The only thing I didn't enjoy was that the Wallander stories seem to be a bit repetitive in terms of the bad guy tending towards revenge for abuse. Hasn't this been done two or three times already? Either way, it was still the best of the series and total Emmy bait.

Glad to see Sherlock starts up next week. Holy S! It is so good. I have seen them already, multiple times, and can't wait to watch again.

Does anyone know if they are making any more Lewis or Foyle series? I heard that Wallander won't be back for at least two years. I'm wondering what 2011's Mystery! programs will be. It seems like a lot of the shows we've grown accustomed to in the last few years are winding down.
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#1974

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Posted Oct 17, 2010 @ 11:37 PM

RE: Foyle's War http://www.guardian....arget-metrodome

Re: Lewis http://www.mirror.co...15875-22399705/
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#1975

bellN

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Posted Oct 18, 2010 @ 5:58 AM

Thought tonight's Wallander was outstanding. Kenneth Branagh was wonderful. The only thing I didn't enjoy was that the Wallander stories seem to be a bit repetitive in terms of the bad guy tending towards revenge for abuse.

this is the first episode of this series I've been able to watch all the way through, although I couldn't tell you why. Maybe I need to be well-rested to sit through the bleakness. I love that Wallander is flawed, yet functioning. I love that all of the people working with him are supremely normal, rather than super heroes. the young guy seems lazy,the middle-aged woman is a nag, the younger woman has family responsibilities. I can believe that [through Wallander's eyes] this is exactly how they seem.
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#1976

attica finch

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Posted Oct 18, 2010 @ 9:54 AM

Saskia Reeves, the woman that played the love interest, is such an interesting looking woman; I'm always happy to see her in stuff. My first exposure (heh) to her was in that lots-of-nudity, incest-with-Clive-Owen flick Close My Eyes, which: wow.

I'm beginning to wonder if wardrobe has nothing else on the racks to fit the boss-lady. She's been wearing the same yellow-brown print dress for the entire series. It's a nice touch in that most people have repeats in their work wardrobe, and Europeans tend to have more repeats than USers, but a change of clothes would be good, I think. Even Kurt changed his clothes this ep (and didn't he look nice in that well-tailored black suit!).

Still don't know how our villainess managed to lug the third vic to the jetty. Or did he walk himself, like the second one (but then, how did she get him locked up until she took him to the woods?)?

Kurt picking up the paintbrush broke my heart. That he painted with it later, broke it again. But me, if I had a place on the water like Pa Wall, I'd be sorely disinclined to leave it for any reason at all.
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#1977

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Posted Oct 18, 2010 @ 8:13 PM

This is only my second episode in the Mystery! series. They've both been Wallander and I must say Kenneth Branagh is fantastic as Wallander. I don't know how many of these movies there have been as I only set up the recording to catch Sherlock next week but I'm really glad it caught two of the Wallander movies. I watched them both tonight and I was riveted.
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#1978

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Posted Oct 19, 2010 @ 7:35 AM

You mean Wallander actually has a glimmer of hope and potential happiness in this ep? And he shaved? Gasp! It was almost a twist that the involved party who catches the detective's fancy wasn't a future victim or the criminal, I've seen too many cop shows. Just once I'd like the pretty person of interest to say "You're a nice guy, I don't want you to get in trouble, how bout you hold off until this case is closed?" That said, I loved the scenery in this, and liked the squad interactions. They don't seem like "token girl," "young guy" so much as ordinary people who are filling the job.

In a bizarre timing coincidence for other roles, last night I was feeling nostalgic and threw in a disc of Faerie Tale Theatre. Picked "The Boy Who Left Home to Find Out About the Shivers," since I never saw it when I was 6 years old. Guess who plays the innkeeper? Papa Wallander himself, David Warner! Didn't get to finish the whole thing, but Warner and Christopher Lee seemed to have fun with the exaggerated mwa-ha-ha villainy:

WARNER: His majesty, King Vladimir--
LEE: Vlah-DEE-mir...
WARNER:--VlahDEEmir the second--
LEE: The fifth
WARNER: eye roll


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#1979

attica finch

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Posted Oct 19, 2010 @ 11:39 AM

So, with the next installment of Mystery being Sherlock, will we post about it here or in Sherlock's own thread?
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#1980

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Posted Oct 19, 2010 @ 12:48 PM

Excellent question, attica finch! I would personally like to have it all in the Sherlock thread for continuity's sake but I think the prevention of spoilers would be easier to do here.
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