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#3001

Lathund

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Posted Sep 20, 2012 @ 3:33 PM

What language would Wallander and his Latvian counterparts be speaking? Swedish? Latvian? English?

I found it almost unbelievable that Wallander was getting around in Riga so easily, given the language difference. Or maybe I just don't realize how much Swedes and Latvians know each other's languages?


In all likelyhood English. Swedish, Norwegian and Danish (And to a much lesser extent Faroese and Icelandic) are mutually intelligible. Latvian isn't at all related to it, nor to Russian for that matter. As far as Russian goes, not many native Swedes speak it. We've viewed them as our #1 enemy for centuries, ever since we beat Denmark once and for all, which might have something to do with it.
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#3002

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Posted Sep 23, 2012 @ 9:29 PM

I just watched two episodes of Wallander back-to-back ... and I'm not feeling suicidal, so either I'm getting used to the bleakness or this week's wasn't so bad!

It was nice to see the episode end on a happier note - and I think Kurt even smiled during this one.

ETA: OMG, my PBS station is running another (older) episode. I don't think I can do three!

Edited by alphacat, Sep 23, 2012 @ 9:30 PM.

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#3003

JudyObscure

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Posted Sep 24, 2012 @ 7:21 AM

Yes, Kurt Wallander did smile! One might even say he beamed. For the first time I really saw the Great Actor everyone talks about. Bless his heart he's going to be a granddad.

But what of the anti-Christian theme? Or was it sympathetic to the persecuted Swedish Christians? I couldn't tell for sure but I did think it was all sort of frightening from a freedom of religion stand point. Speaking of stereotyping, I do get tired of so many murderers being schizophrenic -- wouldn't it have worked as well if he had simply been a religious fanatic?

An exciting episode anyway -- no trouble staying awake.
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#3004

tanyat

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Posted Sep 24, 2012 @ 10:41 AM

I've tried to like this series, but I just can't watch something set in Sweden about Swedish people and have them all speaking English. It's just too ridiculous. Either adapt it to a British location or use Swedish actor with subtitles. It's insulting to the audience.
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#3005

McBrien76

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Posted Sep 24, 2012 @ 11:01 AM

I've tried to like this series, but I just can't watch something set in Sweden about Swedish people and have them all speaking English. It's just too ridiculous. Either adapt it to a British location or use Swedish actor with subtitles. It's insulting to the audience.


There's already a Swedish version of Wallander but I doubt it would get the kind of audiences that Masterpiece Theatre are looking for.Hence why in the UK, the original Swedish version is aired on BBC4 with subtitles as this channel caters for more niche tastes. Where as the English version of Wallander starring Sir Kenneth Brannagh airs on the BBC'S flagship channel BBC1.
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#3006

alphacat

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Posted Sep 24, 2012 @ 12:41 PM

I disagree that it's insulting to the audience - insulting to the author, maybe. I am more annoyed/insulted when actors fake an accent, even if they do it well. Hugh Laurie had a good American accent for House but it wasn't necessary for him to do that. I was glad that Tim Roth kept his accent in Lie To Me. Or movies set during/just after the cold war where there were the Americans vs. the "Russians" with British accents (see The Hunt for Red October) - always makes me chuckle.

If the choice for BBC was to do Wallander with a British cast or not do it, I'm fine with them using a British cast. As to setting the show in Britain vs. Sweden, it's not a big deal to me. Unless I am watching something that has a specific need to be in a particular location that cannot be recreated anywhere else, I can suspend disbelief. Leverage, a show I love, pretended that Portland, OR was Boston, MA for three seasons and, for me, Boston is more recognizable than Sweden.

What appeals to me about Wallander - the show and the character - is the accessibility of the story and the situations. It's nice to see people who are not hyper (like in a lot of the US shows) and settings that are not bright/shiny, and IMO they pull off the melancholy/ennui quality pretty well. I can empathize with him, whatever country he's from/in. I have really enjoyed the show and I've also appreciated this introduction to Henning Mankell, whose books I really enjoy.

Edited by alphacat, Sep 24, 2012 @ 12:43 PM.

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#3007

jenniferes

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Posted Sep 24, 2012 @ 3:08 PM

I like that the series is set in Sweden, even though it is a bit jarring to me when the books and signs are in Swedish and the characters are speaking English. I guess I can write it off as a bit of good dubbing in what just happens to be the actors' real voices -- ha ha! But it would change a lot to move it to the U.K. especially every time Wallander draws his gun. I like to see him driving through the Swedish countryside on the right-hand side of the road in his Volvo. :-)

The anti-religion story lines are getting a bit old for me -- but that's because I keep seeing it in lots of different places. I think it's almost an over reaction to terrorism. Anyone with any strong belief of any kind is considered a fanatic and evil. And to have the dead father mysteriously have faked his death and come back and the daughter having had an abortion... well, that veered a bit into the melodramatic for my taste. I did think Wallander's relationship with his daughter was well done. Their arguments seemed realistic to me.

Edited by jenniferes, Sep 24, 2012 @ 3:09 PM.

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#3008

peeayebee

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Posted Sep 24, 2012 @ 5:44 PM

Since I'm new to the series -- I just started watching this season -- were the characters of Monika, Anna, and Erik new, or did we actually see that storyline in an earlier season? It seems like they keep referring to things from his past, and I'd like to know what happened with him.

So Erik was supposed to have died in the Heaven's Gate mass suicide, right? Was that in a previous season?

It was very disturbing seeing Jannek light those swans on fire. I was worried about what was to come, but at least there wasn't anything as graphic as that.

Why did all those people give their money to Jannek? Were they all in the church where Anna met Jannek, all in the outreach program? Were they just helping him by giving him all their money because they wouldn't need it (after committing suicide)?

I really enjoyed the scene with Kurt and Linda getting her ultrasound. Very sweet. I had tears running down my face.
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#3009

Cgr

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Posted Sep 24, 2012 @ 6:20 PM

The 2 best parts of this show were the beginning where Kurt came home to the dog. One of the few warm moments in this series. And then the ending with the ultrasound. Truly tear worthy. I was surprised at the ending and did find it sort of contrived. The Sweden/English thing doesn't bother me. Look at all the Russian bad guys who speak pretty good English in most spy shows.
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#3010

peeayebee

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Posted Sep 24, 2012 @ 6:59 PM

The Swedish/English thing doesn't really bother me either, though every once in a while I'm suddenly reminded that it's set in Sweden, like when we hear people's names or see anything printed.

One thing I really like about this show is how the police work is conducted. People are doing their jobs and doing them competently. Just little things like when Wallander had a police officer take Anna and Monika out of the house "quickly and calmly" (I think he said). It just feels very real to me.
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#3011

attica finch

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Posted Sep 25, 2012 @ 9:42 AM

How much is it possible to love Lindsay Duncan? I might be at the limit. She's always value-added. (And gets points for keeping her face, and being un-vain enough to forgo makeup.)

I had a wee bit of 'aww' to see the dog thump his tail so vigorously on the bed when the phone rang. Maybe breakfast, daddy? Huh? Huh? Please?

After the really disturbing swan-blaze, I was horrified to think they were gonna follow up with a bunny roast. Do they want to be picked on by animal activists? So it was with some relief that the flames were seen to engulf the dude, not the bunnies (even though it's reasonable to assume they got burnt, at least we didn't have to hear/see it).

I liked the ambiguity of the scene with Anne-Britt. Was she kicking him out from a place of forgiveness? Or was it 'you've done enough damage, thanks'? I watched the scene twice, and I honestly couldn't tell. And KB played it like he couldn't either. Good work.

I really like the detective/police work of the Wallender shows much moreso than some of the others. I feel like the intuitive leaps Kurt makes are completely reasonable (unlike Lewis, whose insights seem shoehorned in), and I like the team-oriented approach. Kurt even gave a 'well-done!' to Kristina after she'd done a bit of legwork, which is vanishingly rare. The mysteries deepen in a logical way, and are solved the same way.

The anti-religion story lines are getting a bit old for me -- but that's because I keep seeing it in lots of different places. I think it's almost an over reaction to terrorism.

I'm fascintated by them. I've read that Europe is in general becoming more and more irreligious, which may be jarring for Americans, who are not (at least in public life. I see a bit more atheism visible, but try to get through a political convention without some kind of god-invoking every five minutes). In fact, I was reading a piece in the Guardian (UK) yesterday about pre-marital sex. Written by an American, it advocated for...pre-marital sex, and that 'saving oneself' is in many ways bad for you. Now, that's fully provocative for an American audience, who, even though nobody actually saves themselves, still pays lip service to that notion. But the comments on the article, mostly written by Europeans, were largely 'sheesh, who cares?' So, no, I don't think the anti-religious storylines you're seeing are a response to terrorism; I suspect they're in response to ongoing demographic changes on the continent.
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#3012

commenter

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Posted Sep 26, 2012 @ 1:34 AM

Well, for such an uncommunicative guy, Wallander sure is extra chatty with his dog.

Things that bugged me in this episode (and I never watch previews, even Alan Cummings’ intro, so I had no idea what was going to follow after these things happened):

1. Anna comes in the middle of the night distressed and wanting to talk about her father's suicide to Wallander, her friend's father -- because she trusts him, she said. Before saying a word about that (even before offering her a seat, I think, though he did offer her water), Wallander says, “Let’s call your mother” (whom she doesn’t even live with) and he walks away to get the number. Talk to her, man, I’m thinking, she trusts you. He mumbles a few platitudes while he’s looking in another room for the number, during which time, of course, the poor girl splits.

2. When Wallander’s daughter then says she’s letting herself into and staying the night in Anna’s home because she can’t reach her, I was surprised Wallander didn’t even walk his daughter into the place to make sure everything was OK. She could have found Anna’s body, with the girl having committed suicide (like her father's reported suicide). Or she could have found some foul play involving the – literally – escaped criminally insane man (who Wallander knew had watched a woman burn to death). Granted, at that point, they didn’t know that that same guy really was mixed up in Anna’s case too, but still, I thought Wallander should have walked his daughter in.


The English dialogue in a show set in Sweden doesn’t seem to me to be any different from any number of shows made for English-speaking audiences and set in other countries, starting from Shakespeare’s plays set all over Europe and The Sound of Music set in Austria etc.

(I would be curious to see, though, and I’ve wondered about it, if I’d find the Swedish version’s Wallander more likeable/relatable!)

Similar to what someone said above, I much prefer having the characters speak regular English rather than English in a (usually bad imitation) foreign accent for the entire movie. Those movies make me think that if the characters were, say, Korean, they wouldn’t talk in heavily Korean-accented English to one another, they’d talk in Korean; so the producers should either have them talk in Korean and subtitle it, or just have them talk in regular English, and we’ll understand that it's all a translation of what they would have said to one another in their native tongue.

I found the ultrasound scene moving but also a bit awkward since they depicted what I've never seen in multitudes of onscreen pregnancy ultrasound scenes before: her very realistically unzipped pants and pushed-down underwear.

I wanted Wallander to actually apologize to Ann-Britt for his part in their predicament the day she got injured. I guess his faithful visits to her will have to suffice right now.

Edited by commenter, Sep 26, 2012 @ 11:35 PM.

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#3013

JudyObscure

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Posted Sep 26, 2012 @ 10:06 PM

How much is it possible to love Lindsay Duncan? I might be at the limit. She's always value-added. (And gets points for keeping her face, and being un-vain enough to forgo makeup.)


I know! As she gets older she's starting to remind me of the great Liv Ullman.

I wanted Wallander to actually apologize to Ann-Britt for his part in their predicament the day she got injured.

I was holding my breath for it. Surely he knows he shouldn't have taken her into the middle of those dogs.
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#3014

attica finch

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Posted Sep 27, 2012 @ 9:38 AM

Isn't it weird that Lindsey Duncan and Uma Thurman have both been married to Gary Oldman? [/tangent]
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#3015

M. Darcy

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Posted Sep 27, 2012 @ 1:28 PM

and I never watch previews, even Alan Cummings’ intro

He doesn't really say anything anymore. Not even the word...murder.

If you are in the DC area, WETA UK is going to be showing Morse episodes next month.

The other day, I was telling my Mom which Lewis episode was on - the one with the all female college reunion...with the girl in the coma. And, I then thought - I've going to an Oxford reunion in two years, I'm going to be killed! That's the plot line of most Lewis episodes.
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#3016

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Posted Sep 28, 2012 @ 4:34 AM

Isn't it weird that Lindsey Duncan and Uma Thurman have both been married to Gary Oldman? [/tangent]


I think you're confusing Lindsey Duncan with Lesley Manville.
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#3017

JudyObscure

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Posted Sep 28, 2012 @ 9:40 AM

And, I then thought - I've going to an Oxford reunion in two years, I'm going to be killed!


Don't go M. Darcy! Might as well go to a house party with Miss Marple.
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#3018

attica finch

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Posted Sep 28, 2012 @ 9:52 AM

I think you're confusing Lindsey Duncan with Lesley Manville.

D'oh! I am indeed.
Moving along...
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#3019

braggtastic

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Posted Sep 29, 2012 @ 7:19 PM

I finally saw the third ep of this series (thanks to Long Island's channel 21 being on my cable system & having a Saturday afternoon rerun). My Sunday nights are jam packed & I forgot about the overnight repeat earlier this week. Grandpa Kurt. So help me if that child winds up in danger in any way... Are they doing a fourth series? How many episodes is the Swedish original?

Nut jobs being mad about immigrants to their country, lack of religion in people's lives etc. I guess other countries are a lot like the US after all.
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#3020

commenter

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Posted Sep 29, 2012 @ 8:32 PM

I watched part of the late night rebroadcast of the last Wallander episode and I remembered something else that seemed rather foolish: Wallander standing, gun drawn, in the path of the oncoming car of the fleeing murderer (after the man arrived at Anna's place, found Wallander and his daughter there, punched Wallander and fled). If the man has burned a woman to death and watched her die, whatever makes Wallander think he'll just pull over and surrender, rather than run Wallander over? (Of course, as in all such movie moments, Wallander leapt out of the way in the nick of time.)

And, I then thought - I've going to an Oxford reunion in two years, I'm going to be killed!

Don't go M. Darcy! Might as well go to a house party with Miss Marple.

Or, if you must go, as soon as one person gets killed, don't wait around to see the murder solved. There's usually a second or third one.


and I never watch previews, even Alan Cummings’ intro

He doesn't really say anything anymore. Not even the word...murder.

Thanks, I noticed that once when I watched his intro on a repeat broadcast, after I'd seen the episode. In general, I find most such introductions show scenes from the upoming show as well as talk about it, so I avoid them all; it's nice to watch shows having absolutely no clue what's going to happen.

Edited by commenter, Sep 29, 2012 @ 8:42 PM.

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#3021

Lathund

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Posted Sep 30, 2012 @ 3:13 PM

Are they doing a fourth series? How many episodes is the Swedish original?


They're doing a fourth and final one, so a total of 12 episodes.

As for the second part; Henning Mankell has written 10 books with Kurt Wallander as the lead character, one with Linda as the lead but featuring Kurt, as well as one short story about Wallander only published in the Netherlands.

The 9 first Wallander novels have been made into Swedish-language films, between 1994 and 2007, starring Rolf Lassgård as Wallander. Like Branagh, he's also an acclaimed Shakespeare actor.

Then there are a further 26 Wallander TV-movies starring Christer Henriksson as Wallander. The very first one is based on the Linda novel, Before the Frost, but the rest are original screenplays not based on Mankell's work.

As for the BBC version, the first two series were based entirely on the Kurt Wallander centric novels by Mankell. This third series is based on one canon Kurt novel (Dogs of Riga) as well as Before The Frost and the short story released only in the Netherlands. Series 4 will feature two Kurt novels, with one of them, the final book about Wallander, split into two parts. So all of Mankell's Wallander-related work except for The Pyramid, will have been covered by the BBC version.

Hope this helps!
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#3022

peeayebee

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Posted Sep 30, 2012 @ 4:30 PM

I wanted Wallander to actually apologize to Ann-Britt for his part in their predicament the day she got injured.

I was holding my breath for it. Surely he knows he shouldn't have taken her into the middle of those dogs.

I think it's clear that he's racked with guilt. It seems like to speak about it in any way would be even more painful.
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#3023

alphacat

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Posted Sep 30, 2012 @ 7:56 PM

I agree that it is clear that he feels incredibly guilt. He may well have said he was sorry and we didn't see it ... I also think it's possible that he's still in the "there are no words to express how sorry ..." stage.

I wish we had another couple of episodes - the three shows at a time model of Mystery can be frustrating, IMO! I wish they would do 5-6 at a time.
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#3024

Sukeyna

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Posted Oct 9, 2012 @ 3:08 PM

I just discovered that the Swedish series, "Henning Mankell's Wallander" is available for streaming on Netflix. Will definitely check it out tonight.
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#3025

hlisy

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Posted Oct 9, 2012 @ 4:49 PM

I just discovered that the Swedish series, "Henning Mankell's Wallander" is available for streaming on Netflix. Will definitely check it out tonight.

Oh do watch it. It's absolutely terrific and Swedish. Plus, the plots are so much better, this Wallander doesn't brood, and all the actors play their part well. Unfortunately, it's the second season, so it kind of picks up in the middle.

Can't say enough good things about it except that it's a shame only 2 seasons were made. Plus, I really would love to visit Ystad, except for the sky-high murder rate. Oxford and Ystad should be sister cities.
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#3026

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Posted Oct 20, 2012 @ 7:58 PM

I enjoyed the last episode of Inspector Lewis with the murder at the women's college. I like the series in general very much.

Don't read this if you haven't seen it.

Something made me suspect Diana Ellerbe at the very beginning but with the additional murders, I stopped thinking about it. When Lewis is talking to the Principal (I was surprised to hear that word in the context of an English college, I only associate it with American schools), after the Principal asks when staircase 5 will be available, Lewis asks her when she last saw Poppy Toynton. She says something like: "Diana wanted someone to fetch her wrap and ... when I saw Poppy, I told her, and she said she'd get it."

But when Hathaway is inspecting Poppy's room at House Beautiful, he overhears Lewis and Diana in the garden outside the window, where Diana is saying something like: "... That's Poppy, you see. I would have got it myself, but she insisted ..." Assuming she was referring to the wrap, Poppy's final errand, either she's lying or the Principal was.

But when the murder seemed linked to Chloe Brooks' assault 10 years earlier, I stopped thinking about that, and my prime suspect was Pauline. Who? Exactly. No one notices Pauline, the porter. I thought that might have given her a motive to do away with these attractive, rich, bright, mostly accomplished women who ignore her and also have romances left and right. (Only Lakshmi seemed to have a warm although brief exchange with Pauline.) Pauline had run-ins or gave disapproving looks towards Freya and the motorcycle-date girl that she locked out; and she also complained about Poppy herself (though she did immediately add that that didn't warrant Poppy's murder and that she hoped the cops would catch the attacker this time). And after Pauline removed from the locker and handed over Poppy's marked-up yearbook, she stopped looking at its pages, which made me think she might have marked it up herself. I suspected Pauline less when the party-goer with the golden beak looked too tall to be her.

I thought the character and the acting of Lakshmi ('Shmi) was very well done. She reminds me a lot of one or two people I know (neither of them is Indian/South Asian/British, but the personality, demeanor and expressions are just right).

Weird that days after he began investigating the old attack at the college, Lewis' wife dies; and then days after he starts the new investigation there 10 years later, his date is murdered.

Edited by commenter, Oct 20, 2012 @ 8:09 PM.

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#3027

dcalley

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Posted Oct 21, 2012 @ 7:25 PM

I've only just finished series 3 of Wallander (the last one is going to expire from PBS.org soon). I like Wallander with the dog, but I feel bad that the boy had to say goodbye to him. I also wonder if Wallander's got someone who comes around to let him out during the day.

The brief exchange between Linda and her dad about cheating stuck out to me.
Mom always thought you and her had an affair.
Well, we can talk about who had an affair and who didn't, Linda. I don't know if you want to, but we can.

I notice Linda didn't take him up on that offer.
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#3028

M. Darcy

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Posted Nov 15, 2012 @ 11:38 AM

On Monday, I did get to see Our Boys with Laurence Fox. Who was really great in the show and even skinnier in person if you can imagine that. And, I was a dork and got his autograph afterwards and told him how much I loved Lewis. But, get this - yesterday, Kevin Whately saw the show. So if he had gone two days earlier, I would have been in the same room as Lewis and Hathaway!
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#3029

Milz

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Posted Nov 16, 2012 @ 1:18 PM

Nothing dorky about that, imo. I dorked-out when I got Jacques Pepin's autograph a few years ago at the National Book Festival several years ago.
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#3030

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Posted Dec 1, 2012 @ 11:26 AM

I just saw Case Histories for the first time when they re-played it this month. I have a question about episode 3. Why did Jackson and Reggie need to rent a car to go to Joanna's aunt house? I know his car broke down, but was it still sitting by the side of the road? If so, how were they getting around in the first place, i.e. how did they get to Joanna's house when they snuck in?
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