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#2971

peeayebee

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Posted Sep 10, 2012 @ 5:11 PM

My only quibble was that I would have though the police examining/exhuming the first victim "should" have realized the earth/grave had been disturbed fairly recently .... even moved a considerable distance.

Very true. From the glimpse of the skeleton we got, I don't see how the guy could have moved it without the bones separating from each other. It didn't look like any ligaments or muscles remained, but I could be wrong.

When Wallander had the revelation that something was wrong about the gravesite and bushes, what did he dug out of the earth? It just looked like odd-shaped smooth, black rocks to me.
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#2972

susan sunflower

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Posted Sep 10, 2012 @ 6:07 PM

Me too -- It looked like 3 flat black stones to me, but I couldn't be sure ... I think it was just supposed to convey that "something" was bothering him that he could not as yet name ... though scary neighbor's wife KEPT insisting there were no currrant bushes when they lived there (I think she said it 3 times) that caused him to look at the real estate agent photos ...etc. I wasn't sure how long that person (whoever she was) had been dead and bured -- which also confused me. Blech. Also, what about those BIRDS???

Fow good measure -- why did the "son" attack Wallander's girfriend (rather than just slip away)? It I'd have been her, I'd have been back to the safety of my flat very quickly after that particularly if left as a "work widow" day in and day out. Brrr.
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#2973

cyberducks

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Posted Sep 10, 2012 @ 8:04 PM

I watched Wallander for the first time last night. I don't know what to think. Is this show always this depressing?
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#2974

susan sunflower

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Posted Sep 10, 2012 @ 8:29 PM

I'd say that episode was the MOST brutally depressing/anxiety provoking episode I've seen. Wallander is a dour Swede in mid-life crisis, at the end of his career, post-divorce, post-death of his father, with some threatening health problems, mostly stemming from stress, insomnia, drinking too much and being depressed. Sounds like lots of real-life people. He cares about his job, he cares about the victims, but not in some romantic way. He's a warrior. There aren't a lot of laughs. It's not Midsomer Murder or Inspector Lewis to be sure.
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#2975

Cress

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Posted Sep 10, 2012 @ 11:12 PM

I tried to watch Wallander before, but the shows are so bleak. I've given up trying to get into it.
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#2976

susan sunflower

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 9:15 AM

There's a reason Dickens is so popular. Actually I find going beneath/beyond the oh-so-picturesque aspects of Sweden fascinating and I'm bored with the problems and foibles of the upper classes. I was momentarily surprised that there even could be prostitution in such as desolate area. I was geographically a bit unmoored, still uncertain why such an enormous almost empty ferry was making regular stops to such a backwater. I wondered if "Polish" = prostitute in such places, representing opportunity only for those whose native countries are even bleaker.

All of the women -- top to bottom -- were the almost nameless, faceless victims of men and their foibles, including Wallender's girlfriend and the police officer hit by the sledgehammer. Wallander is convincingly gobsmacked and nearly speechless in trying to figure out how his life ended up just where he finds himself. Oddly, I don't find it "depressing" -- in contrast, makes my life seem full of opportunity ;-)) It's called "drama" and it's not in the least "soap opera-ish"... until next week.
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#2977

attica finch

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 9:22 AM

I don't see how the guy could have moved it without the bones separating from each other.

Fredrik had a backhoe, which means he could have picked up the whole blackcurrant shrub and body beneath in one big scoop. I don't know how feasible this is in reality, but it's enough to provide me with a working fanwank.

I can't disagree with assessments of how bleak the show is, but gosh, I like it. The landscapes, the sea, the well-worn offices, the low-angled, thin light -- just swell. It's a great showcase for Branagh. That scene at Ann-Britt's bed, with the circling camera finally settling on Kurt's profile just as his eyes brim over with tears? Gorge. That's some technique right there, and how.
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#2978

jenniferes

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 9:44 AM

Are we sure the old farmer man (father of murderer of two Polish prostitutes) didn't kill the first prostitute (the one who was moved with the bushes)? On the phone, the daughter of the dog-owner seemed to imply it was the old farmer man who behaved badly with the prostitutes. I guess that doesn't make any sense -- by moving the bones, he'd be bringing attention to his own crime. But for some reason, I got the sense that those were really old bones, like 20 year old bones, not a recent crime.

The Polish murders made more sense to me, motive-wise. The one becomes pregnant and asks for money, so he kills her by pushing her off the ferry. Then he kills the other one thinking she might know who he is. But if the first murder (bush bones victim) is also the son, then he just becomes psycho killer dude.

I got confused (but I did watch it online, which I find allows for more distractions). I love the atmosphere and acting, but I have a hard time paying attention to every detail. And I agree with the folks here -- watching it twice might be too depressing.
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#2979

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 10:23 AM

Even though they are always pretty dark, I really enjoy the Wallender mysteries because I love Kenneth Branagh (even I am distracted by his absolute lack of any lips whatsoever). Have we met his girlfriend before? It seemed to me that all of the sudden he is moving in with someone, but she mentioned that it had been two years. I haven't read the books, so maybe they are just jumping around and not producing all of the stories in order.

Edited by Deanie87, Sep 11, 2012 @ 10:24 AM.

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#2980

attica finch

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 11:49 AM

Have we met his girlfriend before?

Yeah, she appeared in one of the last season's eps, as a florist who was the ex-lover of one of the murder victims in that ep. She went with Kurt to his dad's funeral. (I remember because Branagh was sporting a particularly well-tailored black suit, as opposed to his usual slovenly self.) They've jumped ahead in time, obvs, but they laid the ground for him to be in a romance with Vanja.
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#2981

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 3:24 PM

[shallow] I was disappointed not to have a Tom Hiddleston fix. Magnus is kind of a douchebag, but awfully easy on the eyes. [/shallow]


Oh my god, is that who played Magnus? That's why he looked vaguely familiar in the Thor pics in Entertainment Weekly. Man, do I feel stupid for not recognizing him.

Even though they are always pretty dark, I really enjoy the Wallender mysteries because I love Kenneth Branagh (even I am distracted by his absolute lack of any lips whatsoever).


I'll watch absolutely anything with Ken, the Lipless Wonder, and he has been particularly good in Wallander. But yeah, it is pretty bleak. If the cast and writing weren't so excellent, I don't know if I could stand it.
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#2982

attica finch

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 4:09 PM

the Lipless Wonder

I read an interview with him regarding playing Olivier in My Week With Marilyn. For that movie, they did a wee bit of prosthesis on his chin and lower lip to approximate LO's profile. He quipped that it was fun to have a lip for a change. Hee!
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#2983

peeayebee

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 6:52 PM

Fredrik had a backhoe, which means he could have picked up the whole blackcurrant shrub and body beneath in one big scoop. I don't know how feasible this is in reality, but it's enough to provide me with a working fanwank.

Ah yes. That makes sense. When Wallander is looking at Fredrik's property where he had dug, it was a huge hole, as if -- like you said -- he had used the backhoe. That would also explain (I think) why forensics wouldn't catch that everything had been moved.


Are we sure the old farmer man (father of murderer of two Polish prostitutes) didn't kill the first prostitute (the one who was moved with the bushes)? On the phone, the daughter of the dog-owner seemed to imply it was the old farmer man who behaved badly with the prostitutes.

I can't remember how the daughter put it, but I think she said something like "the creepy guy from the farm next door," leaving us to assume it was the old farmer. I remember when earlier Fredrik told Wallander that he was estranged from his family I thought that would be significant, but then I forgot about it.


The Polish murders made more sense to me, motive-wise. The one becomes pregnant and asks for money, so he kills her by pushing her off the ferry. Then he kills the other one thinking she might know who he is. But if the first murder (bush bones victim) is also the son, then he just becomes psycho killer dude.

When Wallander tells Fredrik that the girl in the grave was pregnant, Fredik was surprised, which leads me to believe that his son killed her because she was pregnant, same as he did with the Polish woman.


I don't mind the bleakness of the series. I do find it interesting, and I'll watch more. Can anyone tell me why Wallander's picture was on the front page of the newspaper that Fredrik showed him? Is the emotional trouble that Wallander is going thru due to all of the murder cases he's worked on, or is it more because of one in particular?
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#2984

swissair100

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Posted Sep 11, 2012 @ 10:38 PM

Is this show always this depressing?


YES...Seems like a good drink will help before a Wallander episode. Truly bleak, dark & relentlessly depressing...Love the camerawork though, & to watch Branagh's portrayal of this very complex detective.

And did enjoy the ringtone reference.

Edited by swissair100, Sep 12, 2012 @ 10:38 AM.

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#2985

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Posted Sep 12, 2012 @ 1:36 PM

Yep, it's depressing, but beautiful at the same time. Just takes some effort to see the beauty through the gloom...

Re-watched season one of Inspector Lewis over the past several days, including the season one finale last night (with the woman who had cut off her baby brother's hands when she herself was just a child). The scene with Hathaway using "psychology" by letting go of the guy dangling out of the window to prove to him that he did really want to be saved was so amazing. Laurence Fox was perfection there. I still love the show, but I think I loved it better in the earlier seasons.

Of course, I had nightmares all night about little girls trying to sew babies' hands back on, and men trying to throw their (not!) children to their deaths. To think that Lewis is the most light-hearted of the Mystery! series!
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#2986

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Posted Sep 14, 2012 @ 8:57 PM

I like Wallander but I can only watch each ep once. This one started out on a hopeful note. Wallander seemed clean and happy for a change. That didn't last long. He quickly moved back to looking like death warmed over once again.

He and Vanja won't last as a couple, especially considering the bit about keeping her flat. Can't blame her, really.
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#2987

MegK

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Posted Sep 15, 2012 @ 12:20 AM

Bleak as it is, I absolutely adore Kenneth Branagh as Wallander. And I loved the way this episode was bookended by opposite ends of the spectrum emotionally: He was uncharacteristically lighthearted at the beginning, actually smiling as he drove away from the crime scene, back to his new family and his new home. Which inevitably gives way to the real Wallander by the end: a dark and fractured soul.

I only wish Linda hadn't cut off contact. I thought Jeany Spark was really good in the part, and their relationship allowed us to see a different side of Wallander.

Hathaway, Neville Longbottom and Rory Williams! I can't even imagine seeing all three on stage together.

I envy you, M. Darcy! I'd kill to see Messrs. Hathaway, Longbottom and "Pond" together. Enjoy!
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#2988

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Posted Sep 15, 2012 @ 12:33 AM

So detectives Wallander and Ann-Britt are in Fredrik's home, discussing the investigation of a corpse found on Fredrik's neighbor's property, probably dating back to when a previous resident lived there, and when Fredrik overhears Ann-Britt tell Wallander the name of that former neighbor, Petrus, Fredrik grunts.

Detectives Wallander and Ann-Britt turn to look at Fredrik. "Petrus!" says Fredrik. "That man was a criminal. Pervert." Detectives Wallander and Ann-Britt look at one another, then leave the premises -- without another word to Fredrik, except when Wallander thanks him for coffee before walking out of the house. !!?!!

What kind of detective work is that?! They should have inquired further about Petrus' supposed criminal activity, as per his neighbor. I was dumbfounded. So then after talking to Petrus, returning to the police station, hearing that Petrus ran prostitutes including his own daughters, Wallander INSISTS on going back IMMEDIATELY to question Petrus further. "Had you asked Fredrik just a couple questions about his former neighbor BEFORE you went to Petrus', you mighta had that info on hand to focus your questions around the first time," I found myself saying to Wallander.

Then Wallander INSISTS on scaling the walls, helping his young colleague over, and when she (not he, the senior detective) notes the chained dog and that there were two before, suggesting one is loose, it's too late and the woman is nearly killed by Petrus, whom Wallander later yells at in the station over it. (While I am blaming Wallander's own actions and recklessness. Yes, he shielded her when the dog came at them, but that wasn't enough for me to absolve him.)

Just retire already, Wallander, I'm thinking.

I remember being (even before anything went very wrong) similarly critical of Wallander in the circumstances that led to the shooting of someone in the previous season -- probably the incident over which Wallander fell apart. (I remember thinking that he engaged in unnecessary heroics when help was on the way or unnecessarily cornered a suspect or something like that.) After this incident where Ann-Britt was injured, I knew we were in for the obligatory scenes of a morose Wallander waking up surrounded by bottles of alcohol and pills.

I watch the show because I like Mystery! but Wallander the series and Wallander the man get on my nerves, as does the storyline of on-screen detectives with divorce/divorced parenting/divorced dating issues because they're so devoted to their job; and detectives with a history of traumatic crime in their own lives eg. murdered loved ones. I've read that disrupted personal lives and divorce are common among detectives IRL, but I'd still rather be spared it in the solving of the mystery. Instead, we got a couples therapy scene at the end of this Wallander episode.
(I'm not a fan of and don't enjoy looking at Branagh either.)

He and Vanja won't last as a couple, especially considering the bit about keeping her flat. Can't blame her, really.

Yeah, I know! Get out now, lady. (Before, on top of everything else, he gets you killed -- and he wakes up morose, surrounded by bottles and pills, none of which will help you.)

What I didn't understand in this episode's mystery was the rifle, and I'm inclined to think that it wasn't planted by Fredrik, as suggested above. What prompted Fredrik to lead Wallander to the investigation of a cold case was realizing that his son had repeated the crime, and that enough was enough. It wouldn't help to implicate another man, Petrus.

(Unless Fredrik thought that if the pimp next door were arrested and the prostitution stopped, his son would no longer have access to the women he keeps victimizing, but that's far-fetched -- especially since the first victim was not a hooker but a baby-sitter for the Petrus family.)

I'm thinking out loud, but while it briefly seemed more likely that the son rather than his father hid the rifle there when the investigations began, ETA: it would be pretty hard for Fredrik's son to go to their former neighbor's new home, wherever it is, and get into his shed to plant/hide anything, especially since little love seems to be lost between them, so it's not like they'd stay in touch and visit. And that got me thinking further about the rifle, and remembering what had been said, namely that it was Petrus' own rifle. I've put that in a separate comment below (#2991).

As to what Wallander picked up on the ground near the body's location, I couldn't tell either, but I thought he was perhaps noting different types of soil than what was elsewhere on the property, because IIRC, he walks a few paces away and grabs a handful of soil there too, and looks at it (and compares them?).

(At first, I thought he had picked up something shiny and rubbery, like a glove with rubbery fingers; and that recalled the glove Petrus had dropped after handling the sledgehammer and which Wallander picked up later. But then the scene seemed more like it was about the earth itself.)

If the observations that Wallander picked up several smooth things are correct, maybe it's that the soil near the grave had stones in it, whereas the top soil elsewhere in the vicinity didn't.

I figured the "accident" that Fredrik referred to must be the explanation his son had given him years ago about how Lina, the first victim, died at the son's hands.

Edited by commenter, Sep 15, 2012 @ 9:38 PM.

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#2989

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Posted Sep 15, 2012 @ 1:44 AM

ITV have confirmed that filming has now started in Oxford on the first full season of Inspector Morse prequel,Endeavour.

Shaun Evans will be returning to the role of DC Endeavour Morse along with Roger Allam as DI Fred Thursday, James Bradshaw as Dr Max DeBryn and Abigail Thaw as newspaper editor, Dorothea Frazil.

New additions to the cast include stage actor Sean Rigby as PC James Strange (the man who would eventually go on to to become Morse's boss),Anton Lesser as Chief Superintendent Reginald Bright (replacing DCS Crisp (Terence Harvey)) and Jack Laskey as DS Peter Jakes (replacing DS Arthur Lott (Danny Webb)).

The four films have been written by Russell Lewis who devised the series along with the Inspector Morse spin-off, Inspector Lewis. Colin Dexter will act as a consultant.

The 4 films will be produced by Mammoth Screen in partnership with Masterpiece.
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#2990

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Posted Sep 15, 2012 @ 6:57 PM

I'm finally beginning to like Wallander now and thought that the first episode was pretty good. Yes, Kurt is a crap detective, like when he let the old man suspect go into the room where the rifle was to answer the phone. Meanwhile Wallander has his back to him the whole time. Helloooo. Though I knew it was going to be a doozy of an episode when Wallander smiled and was happy for 5 minutes, which spells D-O-O-M. While I'm not a Sir Kenneth fan, I do think he does well here and doesn't overact.

I've seen the Swedish versions and of course, they are miles better than the BBC. But getting an audience to sit through subtitled shows would be a bit of a challenge.

Can't wait to see the new Foyle's War scheduled for next year. Have been watching reruns and it's amazing how much Kitchen can convey without yelling or overacting. I blame FW for my interest in the British Homefront.
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#2991

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Posted Sep 15, 2012 @ 9:49 PM

What I didn't understand in this episode's mystery was the rifle, and I'm inclined to think that it wasn't planted by Fredrik, as suggested above. What prompted Fredrik to lead Wallander to the investigation of a cold case was realizing that his son had repeated the crime, and that enough was enough. It wouldn't help to implicate another man, Petrus.


After reading the speculation on this forum about the rifle possibly being planted by Fredrik or someone, I forgot something, which I later remembered: Lina was killed with Petrus' rifle, Fredrik said. She was killed while the Petruses were away on vacation, which we already know from Petrus' daughter; and Fredrik said [his son told him] that it happened "by accident" at Petrus' home, while "Petrus was away," when "Petrus' gun went off."

Even though the claim that it was an accident is probably false, if the gun really was Petrus' and the son used it to kill the pregnant Lina when she was home alone, then the rifle would presumably have remained in Petrus' house since the 2001 murder.

Maybe Petrus himself hid it after the current investigation began or after his daughter shared her suspicions with Wallander.

The Petruses knew Lina was missing when they returned from their autumn 2001 vacation. The daughter left for the US against her parents' will after September 11, so it was almost right away. Maybe there was blood or shells (or whatever rifle bullets leave) or bullet holes or something that led them to suspect foul play in the house and that Petrus' rifle had been used; but they never knew for sure who did it and wouldn't report it for fear of suspicion being focused on Petrus and into his other illegal activities.

(But all the dark dealings with all the girls may have driven the daughter to finally pick up and leave the house of sorrow.)

Once Wallander starts sniffing around Petrus and looking to draw blood, Petrus wouldn't want the murder weapon to be found in his possession, even though he's innocent.

Wallander found the rifle after he found Petrus' glove that he'd taken off after using the sledgehammer. Maybe it was curiousity about why Petrus emerged from the direction of the shed with gloves on that led Wallander to go there and look around, and poke around the water-filled container -- something I had really wondered about at the time. It just seemed a little too fortuitous then. Now, maybe not so much.

Still thinking aloud, but now this all sounds pretty plausible, unless I've forgotten anything.

Edited by commenter, Sep 15, 2012 @ 9:57 PM.

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#2992

attica finch

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Posted Sep 16, 2012 @ 3:49 PM

Sir Kenneth

Holy crap, I had no idea he'd gotten the sword-tap! Gettin' above his station, he is!
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#2993

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Posted Sep 16, 2012 @ 4:08 PM

I thought the rifle was found at the bottom of an oil bath, such that mechanics use to soak parts ... I don't know. I figured the son (or father) planted it there to incriminate Petrus (who might have been expected to better dispose of it, break it down, scatter parts if he was aware it could somehow incriminate him). My gut reading was that the father realized -- at that moment -- that his son's story had been a lie, and that he had been shielding a murderer (not a perpetrator of an accident). Oh, and perhaps flooded by the realization that his son had also precipitated his wife's suicide, perhaps she had guessed the truth. As he told Wallander the "accident story," his being an unwitting accomplice, enabling his son to continue to kill women simply overwhelmed him... ===================================================================== I was thinking last night that I personally wish that -- since neither Wallander or Lewis (or possibley Zen) actually overlap from episode to episode (soap opera fashion) that they NOT be shown consecutively in mini-series fashion. I think Wallander is generally the better program, but I enjoy Lewis even if it annoys me. I think the "flaws" of both become more apparent seeing episodes in succession. Standing alone, I think they can be appreciated more freshly. Just my 2 cents.
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#2994

attica finch

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Posted Sep 17, 2012 @ 10:02 AM

Well, he lost the gf and the kid, but he got to keep the house and the doggie!

Was this filmed in Riga? That's a pretty down-at-heels kind of burgh, if you ask me. I was expecting a shinier city.

Overall, I liked the creepy intensity of this ep. Not so morose, but a nice sheen of good old cold-war paranoia instead.
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#2995

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Posted Sep 17, 2012 @ 12:29 PM

Latvia guy is totally Kurt's long-lost twin in moroseness (morosity?). Although at times even Kurt was looking at him like, "Dude, lighten up." No wonder Mrs. Latvia ended up with Kurt in the end. It was like having her husband back!

I have to admit that I thought both commanding officers were in on it. The acid was a particularly cruel element. I was worried that the conclusion would show hopeless corruption and Kurt going back to Sweden with the case unresolved. Maybe it was the down-at-the-heels setting as attica finch noted.
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#2996

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Posted Sep 17, 2012 @ 2:56 PM

Criminy I just can't take Wallander's deeeeeep intensity at times... too many loong soulful looks back and forth... just a big yyyaaawwwnnn. And cripe it didn't take long for that woman, whatever her name was, to jump in the sack with Wallander after her husband was practically just killed???!! Duh?
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#2997

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Posted Sep 17, 2012 @ 3:26 PM

And cripe it didn't take long for that woman, whatever her name was, to jump in the sack with Wallander after her husband was practically just killed???!! Duh?

You know, I get that this kind of thing reads creepy, but I've read A. Lot. of stuff on grieving, and it's a thing that pops up frequently. (heh.) Especially right soon after the death. The thinking seems to be that even though your conscious mind is all about loss, your body is all 'hey, I'm not dead yet. Really not. Want an orgasm. Now.' It's Life countervailing Death, as it were. As a result, I found Baiba & Kurt's nookie to be appropriate to the situation.

Of course, for many people, there'd then be post-coital guilt, but that's a whole nother thing.

Edited by attica finch, Sep 17, 2012 @ 3:27 PM.

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#2998

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Posted Sep 17, 2012 @ 5:38 PM

What language would Wallander and his Latvian counterparts be speaking? Swedish? Latvian? English?

I found it almost unbelievable that Wallander was getting around in Riga so easily, given the language difference. Or maybe I just don't realize how much Swedes and Latvians know each other's languages? Another thing I found hard to believe was Wallandar getting out of the Riga police archives (in the bowels of the building) so easily. He just pushed the panic button, and the next second we saw him running on a street outside the building. What about all those locked doors between the archives and the outside?

How he escaped with his life (not to mention his facial features) from this one I'll never be able to figure out.
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#2999

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Posted Sep 18, 2012 @ 1:57 AM

Yes, it was nice to see Wallander having to deal with someone even more uncommunicative and prone to inexplicable actions than himself.

And when Wallander first laid eyes on Liepa's widow -- at the funeral, for goodness sakes -- and the music/scene let us know something might happen between them, I was disgusted at the producers presenting it that way (while the human nature that attica finch describes above is more understandable). So now we're supposed to root for this union going forward? Not I. Though choochi's comment that it's small wonder Baiba Liepa connected with Wallander since he and her late husband have things in common is true! Major Liepa was, however, much better-looking than Branagh. Very much better IMO.

When Liepa said the men in the raft were killed for talking to him, and he asked Wallander if he'd ever been responsible for something like that, I answered on behalf of Wallander: "Yes." Wallander didn't answer (of course). So when Liepa asked him again if someone had ever been hurt as a result of his actions, I again answered on Wallander's behalf: "All the time!" (Again, Wallander didn't answer.)

I'm assuming Wallander and the Latvians spoke in English or some other language (Russian?) but not Latvian, because I think when the Latvians spoke amongst themselves, Wallander did not follow their conversation. Liepa asking Wallander to interpret the Ystad police station fax confirmation slip makes me think he at least probably didn't speak/read Swedish.

Yes, a lot about that episode was unrealistic, I thought, and I enjoyed it less than others.

I thought the rifle was found at the bottom of an oil bath, such that mechanics use to soak parts ... I don't know. I figured the son (or father) planted it there to incriminate Petrus (who might have been expected to better dispose of it, break it down, scatter parts if he was aware it could somehow incriminate him). My gut reading was that the father realized -- at that moment -- that his son's story had been a lie, and that he had been shielding a murderer (not a perpetrator of an accident). Oh, and perhaps flooded by the realization that his son had also precipitated his wife's suicide, perhaps she had guessed the truth. As he told Wallander the "accident story," his being an unwitting accomplice, enabling his son to continue to kill women simply overwhelmed him...


The rifle was wrapped in plastic and bound with tape, but I don't know what the liquid it was immersed in was; maybe it was what you thought.

You're right that Petrus could have disposed of the rifle (his rifle IMO) some other way, but until the day Wallander came asking questions, he probably never thought he was under suspicion because no one even knew that Lina was missing so he'd have no reason to remove or hide the gun. (I think that practically no one even knew who Lina was in 2001, because she was some runaway girl who resisted a path to prostitution and traded it for domestic service.)

I believe it was the very same day that Wallander first started asking Petrus questions that, when Wallander came back and snuck into the compound, Petrus emerged from the shed with gloves on.

It sounds to me like that was the first day Petrus thought he had reason to hide the rifle, and he did so. Maybe Wallander and Ann-Britt's banging on the gate is what alerted him to do it.


Elaborating further on why I don't think the rifle was planted: Fredrik dug up and relocated Lina's corpse on his new neighbor's property so Wallander could solve the murder. He said it was because he (had) believed Lina's death had been an "accident" and he "never thought it could happen again" -- but when his son called him about the second girl, the Polish girl, he knew he had to do something. So he had to have known his son was responsible and needed to be stopped, when he went to the trouble of moving the grave and skeleton; and there'd be no purpose in Fredrik planting evidence on Petrus, IMO.

The son certainly would benefit from incriminating Petrus, but I don't think he could get into Petrus' compound (since they are no longer neighbors and were probably never friends) and get past Petrus, his family and those vicious dogs to hide a rifle.

But in addition, there is the fact that Fredrik (and therefore his son who had to have told him) said it was Petrus' rifle that killed Lina while Petrus was away. If so, Petrus' gun wouldn't be in Fredik's or his son's possession to be planted by them anywhere. At least, that's what I think, if I'm remembering everything correctly.

Edited by commenter, Sep 18, 2012 @ 2:06 AM.

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#3000

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Posted Sep 18, 2012 @ 9:48 AM

I want to say thanks to all of you who have reasoned out the rifle situation. That really had me confused and I appreciate the explanations!
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