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Mental Health on TV


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#181

Actionmage

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Posted Dec 8, 2005 @ 5:31 PM

Moonlit Lady:

Has psychotherapy even been portrayed accurately on television?


IMO, the way Once and Again handled Karen, post-accident was a good start. Much like the Monk example, Karen and the therapist had calm exchanges where Karen started realizing what she wanted/needed, but not the cliched Enormous Epiphany Moment. It was nice because Karen was initially hostile to the idea of thereapy, considering herself okay, just unlucky enough to be in that accident.
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#182

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Posted Jan 26, 2007 @ 12:06 AM

I started watching Monk out of boredom on break. Having taken abnormal psych the previou =s semester, I've been nothing if not disappointed. It seems the writters have gotten OCD confused with OCPD (Obessive complusive personality disorder). While some of Monk's behavoirs do seem OCD-ish (not shaking hands, his handwashing repetition, etc) most of them seem more like OCPD (keeping books straight, etc.). They aren't the same thing, writers.
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#183

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Posted Sep 4, 2007 @ 10:43 PM

I have a friend whose partner has OCD and they love the show and say it's extremely accurate and validating.
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#184

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Posted Sep 5, 2007 @ 12:03 AM

I thought Amy Abbot's depression was well handled on "Everwood", does anyone else agree?


I don't really. Then again, when I watched that arc it hit too close to home. Amy was acting too much like my sister who has bipolar (but I think I wasn't aware of that at the time), so I just really disliked her during the whole thing.
Her father's reaction pissed me off. Refusing to let her go on the meds or be upset at her boyfriend's death, the way he treated his wife when she thought they should try medication, and how he kept giving her free passes for everything. And to watch Bright and all of his problems and trying to deal with his best friend's death, which he did a hell of a lot better than Amy (he refused to play the "Colin's dead" card to not get kicked off the football team for failing a class and then worked his ass off to get into college) just get pushed aside and always put second broke my heart so much. So yeah, I guess it wasn't because of Amy herself that I disliked it. I think that I would find it much better now.



It would be interesting though to have a show about families where someone does have a diagnosed disorder and how they deal with it. How it affects the kids, the husband and, of course, the person with the illness themselves.


I'm with whoever said that last page (I forget, sorry). Obviously.



I think the little bit we've seen of Waverly's bipolar on Friday Night Lights has been handled well. From her crazy behavior during the manic phase, to her curled up on the kitchen floor bawling her eyes out for no real reason, it is very realistic. And so if her boyfriend's reaction, concerned and a little freaked out and unsure of how to deal with it.
I hope they keep that up next season.
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#185

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Posted Sep 5, 2007 @ 10:07 AM

I have to say, I rather liked the House epiosde with the Munchausen patient. I don't know much about mental illness or how Munchhausen is connected to it.


On tv Munchhausen and Munchhausen by proxy is usually portrayed as normal, yet narcissist (and often ruthless) people wanting attention (again, I don't know how correct that is). But in the storyline on House it played out closer to an advanced version of an eating disorder or self mutilaton.

It's been a while since I have seen the episode but the basic gist I got was that she reformed her whole life around the faking of illnesses, researched a lot, faked more and more details, moved from hospital to hospital so she wouldn't get caught. Yet she didn't do it for personal gain. Instead it came across as being highly compulsive to her.

The basic issue of the story is that even though she has Munchhausen's, she also attracted a real illness. House's mission in this episode is to get her to admit that she has Munchhausen's, so he can give a medication that will help her. But if she doesn't have Munchhausen's the medication would harm her.

You can basically see the mental block and just how far she needs to carry on the deception even at the expense that it might hurt her. Even though she in the end has enough self-awareness to admit it, I didn't walk away from the episode with the impression that she was now magically cured.

On the whole she came across as a highly intelligent and very interesting person. (she was played by Cynthia Nixon of SATC fame)

Actually I think House has done a bunch of episodes with mental illnesses. Most notably one where a woman who practises self mutilation wouldn't get an organ donor (apparently as somebody unstable she wouldn't deserve a donated organ over people who are stable) and House lies to get her on the waiting list, basically standing up for mentally ill people also deserving proper medical care.

I also saw the Abby storyline on ER and personally I sympathized with Abby all the way. And I HATE Abby.

Edited by LolaRuns, Sep 5, 2007 @ 10:08 AM.

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#186

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Posted Sep 5, 2007 @ 10:21 AM

I have a problem with how Niki/Jessica is portrayed on Heroes. I think that they are doing a good job in the sense that they show the relationship between trauma and dissociation, but that they are doing a great disservice in that they are portraying the stereotype that multiples are violent and dangerous.
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#187

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Posted Sep 5, 2007 @ 2:21 PM

What's the general opinion on Don the functioning schizophrenic from Dirt? Too much of clichee?
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#188

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Posted Sep 5, 2007 @ 2:57 PM

Actually I think House has done a bunch of episodes with mental illnesses.

There was the schizophrenic patient living on the streets early in the series (Histories), one with a woman misdiagnosed as schizophrenic who really had another disease (The Socratic Method), a severely autistic boy (Lines in the Sand) and the reveal that House's best/only friend was taking antidepressants (Resignation, though that hasn't been fully explored yet).
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#189

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Posted Sep 5, 2007 @ 7:19 PM

On Greek (yeah, whatever, I started watching when I heard they had an out gay character who actually has a love life and is treated as a main character, not a token)... anyway, on Greek, there is a character, Jen, who is usually a sensitive and kind person. This week she tells her boyfriend that her roommate is "an agoraphobic who scares me." We don't meet the roommate. This is the only thing we know about her.

It's not only socially acceptable, but actually apparently justifiable as a throwaway joke, to insult people with mental health diagnoses. Even on a show like Greek, which isn't exactly populated by characters who behave perfectly, this still annoys me.
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#190

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Posted Sep 5, 2007 @ 8:31 PM

What an interesting topic! I've been a school psychologist and professional counselor for the last 5 years, and usually find mental disorders in general to be potrayed in cartoonish (over exaggerated) ways on most tv shows. I enjoyed the first two seasons of Monk (especially the episodes with his neurotic brother), but I've long since lost interest. His potrayal of Obsesisve compulsive personality disorder is well done, but the episodes sometimes revolve around his rituals in very predictable ways so the show became boring for me.

Has psychotherapy even been portrayed accurately on television?


Yes. I go way back in time to the very first pychotherapy session I remember seeing on tv - Alex P. Keaton in therapy on Family Ties, dealing with the sudden death of his good friend. My memory is fuzzy (having not seen the episode in a good ten years), but I remember the therapist was heard and not seen, and simply there to help guide Alex as he worked through his grief. What a profound statement, also, that someone as 'put together' ad straight-laced as Alex benefited from therapy (which was even more taboo in the 80's than it is today).

One issue that bugs me is when I see couples/families in therapy on tv shows (usually sitcoms). Somewhere in the mix the therapist has large styrofoam fuedal sticks (like those things the competitors used in 'the joust" on American gladiators) and the family ends up hitting each other (or something equally goofy). I know this is played for comedic laughs, but sometimes I wonder how much tv my patients have been watching becasue they come in with very very... interesting ideas about what family therapy encompasses. Also... couples therapy does not always revolve around sex, TPTB.
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#191

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 7:43 AM

Has psychotherapy even been portrayed accurately on television?

Does Bob Newhart count? (I mean the older series, set in Chicago, where he's a psychologist/psychiatrist. I don't recall which.) We saw some of his one-on-one and group sessions. Of course it was played for comedy, but still ...
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#192

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 8:41 AM

Does Bob Newhart count? (I mean the older series, set in Chicago, where he's a psychologist/psychiatrist. I don't recall which.) We saw some of his one-on-one and group sessions. Of course it was played for comedy, but still ...


I laughed just being reminded of Newhart-as-therapist: "....uh...do you want to go with that a little....."

In many respects, I do not care for whether Newhart was accurate or not: a little levity about our foibles helps.

In terms of accurate portrayal, however, I thought Joel Grey was excellent as the therapist on Brothers and Sisters last season. Likewise the client, who complained, "all you do is sit there."
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#193

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 9:25 AM

LOl @ Bob Newhart, I think of when he did a hilarious skit on Mad TV, which kind of accurately portrays how some behavior therpaists operate:

Patient: I stick my fingers down my throat and make myself throw up, I'm bulemic.
Doctor: STOP IT!
Patient: But doctor, I feel compelled to... you see my mother always called me fat...
Doctor: No, no, we don't go there.
Patient: But I've been having this dream...
Doctor: No no, we don't go there either. Just Stop it! What else..?
Patient: Well, I'm in self-destrcuctive realtionships...
Doctor: Well, stop it!


The skit goes on from there, LOL. Nah, I wouldn't count Bob Newhart, although his show was entertaining.
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#194

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 12:27 PM

The mom on KyleXY is a therapist. They've only shown her in a session a couple of times, but her work is an on-going issue in the series, because she talks ABOUT* it a lot. Her family adopted Kyle, and he started as one of her patients, so of course that part is a bit much. But I *like* her, especially in the second half of the second season, and one thing I do enjoy is that she's a fully developed character, not just The Therapist. Also, she relates really well to the teens on the show, without being a Mary Sue.

*ETA: she doesn't talk about what goes on in her sessions. It's just that the fact that she's a therapist comes up a lot. Her confidentiality boundaries are a plot point, and when her kids get involved with one of her patients (who they meet at school), that becomes an issue, also. I'm not saying this is realism, just saying it's there.

Edited by possibilities, Sep 6, 2007 @ 12:29 PM.

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#195

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Posted Sep 6, 2007 @ 1:41 PM

Aw, I like Nicole a lot too, possibilities.

And from the little we've seen of her sessions, I think it seems pretty real enough; just sit across from each other and talk, answer the questions she asks and wonder what the heck is she writin down about me.
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#196

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Posted Sep 22, 2007 @ 11:46 PM

[Being involuntarily hospitalised] always portrayed as something that cannot be helped: you tell them you're not crazy, everyone else says "sure, sure" and gives you injections. Illogically enough, everyone seems to get panicked in a situation like that, rather than trying to be calm and discuss it with others in a reasonable way.


I spent a week in-patient and a man arrived there a day or two after I did. I gathered that he had had a panic attack, freaked out, gone to the ER, and while medicated/otherwise out of it his partner had agreed to have him institutionalised. He ended up feeling better and wanting to be released before the necessary amount of time had passed (in Massachusetts, there is a required three-day stay in even the case of voluntary hospitalisation), couldn't be, and shortly started freaking out about it.

Here's where it gets tricky: That's what I heard from him. Obviously, the professionals weren't discussing his situation. There seems to be a hole there (who would institutionalise their partner over a panic attack?), but she was also often there, trying to help him to sign himself out early. But I realised that I intrinsically did believe him less the more he insisted that he was fine and needed to be released. I actually thought about this while I was there, and ended up telling him to calm down, because the more he freaked out and complained, the more it seemed like his reality was some way distorted and like he might need some time to equalise. After seeing that, I do find this plot contrivance more believable (unfortunately).
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#197

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Posted Sep 23, 2007 @ 3:38 AM

Wow. This thread.

I can't tell you how much it's meant to me to watch Stephen Fry's "The Secret Life Of A Manic Depressive", which was a TV special that was aired in the UK a couple of years ago. Fry walked the viewers through his life as a lifelong sufferer of bipolar disorder and explained how he had never actually tried to treat himself, yet that he felt he was doing fine. Of course, after being interviewed by a Cardiff (Wales) psychologist and med school professor, he realizes he's considered almost out of control and has to figure out what to do with what he's found out. He also interviews some people, famous and not-famous, who suffer from varying degrees of manic depression. One of the people whom he interviewed was the actor Richard Dreyfuss, who began treatment for his bipolarity shortly after getting arrested for a DUI, at the height of his manic-ness. He's been taking lithium ever since (for around two decades) and has been able to live a full life because of it. Etc., etc., etc.

At first the special starts out kinda lamely. I expected, from my first impressions, that it'd be just a bunch of intraceleb chumminess disguised as a look inside mental illness. There is no need for Robbie Williams, who isn't even bipolar (though he does suffer from depression) to be on the show except to add star power. And Carrie Fisher comes across a bit annoyingly. But then the "real people" interviews begin and Fry divulges more and more details about his past deeds (which included credit card theft and spending time in prison) that were a result of his undiagnosed bipolarity, and it suddenly becomes this incredibly interesting thing to behold. Oh, I wish one of the Discovery channels here in the U.S. would pick up the special (esp in light of Stephen Fry's guest appearances on "Bones") and air it. I think it's really enlightening for those of us who had little to no idea what bipolar disorder was really like.

Heh, after typing out all of that, I will admit that I have suffered from periods of depression, and will draw from all of your courageouness and admit that I have even been suicidal in the past (though not in the last four years). I was on Zoloft and Celexa for awhile and while I had success with the former (and then my prescription lapsed and I couldn't get in to the dr. to get a new one), the latter fucked me up but good. Eventually I was able to find coping strategies that helped me out, though I'm not 100% convinced I'm free of it all. Anyway, I say all that to say that I really dislike when most TV programs and commercials talk about depression as if it's just a case of "the blues". It's really so much more than that. You feel as though your soul is dwelling in this labyrinthine dungeon and it's exhausted all of its strength trying to crawl out. You don't just cry, you sob from the pit of your being. You don't just hate yourself, you are your very worst enemy and loathe yourself with every fiber of your being. You do not need just to lighten up, to laugh a little, to even have outward successes in your life. Depression, when it's clinical, requires a lot of rethinking of your own thoughts about yourself and is something that takes years to even just live with. And while I recognize that a lot of televised programming would treat depression so lightly because they're looking for immediate resolution, it would be nice if there were more examples in televised media of depression, to name but one mental illness that could fit herein, wasn't treated in a small, finite period of time, but was rather something that was dealt with as a continous and lengthy process.

Um, YMMV, obv. :)
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#198

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Posted Sep 26, 2007 @ 10:55 AM

Anyway, I say all that to say that I really dislike when most TV programs and commercials talk about depression as if it's just a case of "the blues".


I have a mood disorder, too, and I must say some of the ads for antidepressants really annoy me. Like the bouncing Zoloft ball a few years back. Also the ones where they have a woman saying in very somber voice, "I lost all interest in life. I couldn't even laugh at my child's jokes. Or marvel at the fall foliage. Then I took Miracle Pill X and I'm myself again!" Then the VO: "Ask your doctor about Miracle Pill X. Miracle Pill X may not be right for you if you suffer from....." long list of conditions. Miracle X can cause....long list of bad side effects. But they do it like these are just minor considerations, and you will be yourself again on Miracle X.

Steve Martin had a piece in the New Yorker called "Side Effects" making fun of this.
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#199

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Posted Sep 26, 2007 @ 11:42 AM

More reflections on the "accuracy" of therapy issue. The scene with Jake Webber at therapy after his hostage situation seemed plausible.
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#200

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Posted Apr 30, 2012 @ 10:12 AM

I've been watching DVDs of The Bob Newhart Show lately...granted, it's a sitcom, and in a different era. But it still kinda bugs me how ALL Bob's patients are really weird and/or downright lunatics, played for laughs. There is really not one single patient they've shown who can be said to be a regular person who's just going through a rough time. Seriously, show??
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#201

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Posted Apr 30, 2012 @ 11:15 PM

I have depression and Asperger's. I am frequently annoyed at the way both are treated on TV. There are several different types of Asperger's and we all have unique personalities. Not all Aspies are mathematical geniuses who talk like robots and have no feelings toward other people. In fact, some of us are sadly disabled in math and science and struggle with being too sensitive on a daily basis.

And the antidepressant commercials annoy me too. I believe in using medication any time it has benefits for a person and take Wellbutrin for my depression. However, I do have to agree that many therapists today believe that taking a pill is a magical cure for all bad thoughts and feelings and do not want to invest time in the situations that might have caused a person to feel depressed to begin with.

It's kind of like the comedy skit someone posted upthread. "Oh, you lost your job? You have been all over trying to find a new one and no one will hire you? Not even to flip burgers or fry chicken? Quit feeling bad! Take this pill and it will magically go away!"
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#202

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Posted May 1, 2012 @ 5:46 AM

There are several different types of Asperger's and we all have unique personalities.

I've been annoyed at Asperger's (and autism) representation on tv too. As you note, there are so many variants in how it manifests itself in an individual which I am sure makes it hard to generically characterize on tv.

I've watched Parenthood a few times because I wanted to see how Asperger's was portrayed/dealt with. I thought some aspects of the characterization were done ok, but it was inconsistent. Plus, here was what appeared to be an upper-middle income family who had access to (or could pay for) a special school and at home therapist. Most families don't have that level of support, or again, can't pay for it.

Criticism aside, I do applaud that it is being shown on tv (even if not representative of what I am familiar with) and, not always, played for laughs.

Edited by cosmom, May 1, 2012 @ 5:47 AM.

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#203

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Posted May 1, 2012 @ 3:16 PM

I always find it very interesting how Autism gets lumped in with mental health as a general catagory both in the media and by society in-general. I disagree with that tendency. I think at this point I should confess that I actually have mild-to-moderate Asperger's so I speak from experience. I bumped along in a reasonably responsible job for a Bank and I was actually diagnosed as a 27 year old, so I'm not sure that I'm representative. However, I don't see it as an illness or even a condition. To me, this thing I have, its a fundamental part of who and what you are, its not something to be corrected or cured from. If somebody else can't handle it, that's their tough.

What bothers me is that there is a mono-vision of the issue in drama. Just as soon as we start getting noticed, it becomes a fad and then everybody is supposedly Temperance Brennan and comes out and is rude whenever they feel like it. You just can't do that, it's counterproductive. There's a whole process that you learn, at least in my experience, to help you function reasonably well in a workplace and the wider world, but this blatant coming out with whatever you're thinking, you have to first realise that other people don't consider that acceptable behaviour and then teach yourself not to do it no matter how desperate you are to and even then, sometimes you will fail. It doesn't matter that you don't understand why things are as they are and desperately want to try to understand, the rest of the world doesn't care the same way you do, so you have got to shut your mouth and learn to like it. The moderate types like myself will find ways of using the enhanced-recall that we "Aspies" often have, the somewhat obsessional and repetitive behaviours i.e. compulsive list making, extreme analysis of sporting statistics, obsessive devotion to Star Trek (the last one is me), to our advantage but taking that tendency into another field, staring at the bridge of the nose to make it look like you are giving eye-contact (I never do, that kind of contact is uncomfortable), teaching yourself to regulate physical contact and physical space by watching what others do and copying (I don't like being touched even by close relatives which is one of the many reasons family relations are difficult), avoiding office politics wherever possible because of the fundamental problem of "face blindness" - an inability or in my less serious case, a struggle to read facial expressions, body language etc, read and share in humour and generally work out how honest or deceitful somebody else is.

The point is, I don't see this in television. You either get the super-geniuses for whom the condition doesn't stop them doing whatever they want to do (it does, it makes it much harder to sustain employment, get employment or get promotion and maintain essential human relationships) and they'll always have an Angela Montenegro to helpfully interpret things around them. Or their Ryan Cartwright's character on Alphas. I wish I had somebody like Angela to help me, but it just doesn't happen that way. Nor does having super-powers either, sadly. Ironically one of the closer versions to my own inclinations I ever saw was Seven of Nine on Star Trek Voyager and she was recovering her humanity from 18 years of enslavement by the Borg Collective, not suffering from autism, although the symptoms manifested in surprisingly similar ways. I suppose I want something closer to me on screen, I want my own experience to be up there outside of a documentary. I went through life knowing I was different and not knowing why, I got no real help, guidance, support when it really counted, just having to figure it out on my own because all the so-called experts swore to my parents I would grow out of it when I grew up, whatever "it" was meant to be. I resorted to imagining I was my Mother and pretending to do what I thought she would do in-order to have a measure of how 'normal' people conduct themselves in-order to fit in and function.

And just so we're clear, I really don't mind "Cognitively Normal" people i.e., anybody who isn't Autistic (and it's not my term, we have a political rights movement now and a Pride Day - on 18th June every year incidentally), identifying characters as such on television at all. I suppose it might be iritating for some, but often-times they are not too far wrong and it suggests that the viewership is becoming more sophisicated that perhaps the media itself. For example, Saga Norén the Swedish super-detective in The Bridge has got to be, too many signatures not to be. I don't know whether that was the actor's choice to go that far in that direction or whether that was always the writer's and producer's intentions, but at least we are getting some screen-time now. Before we were just nuts. I take that to be a step in the right direction at least.
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#204

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Posted May 1, 2012 @ 6:51 PM

I've watched Parenthood a few times because I wanted to see how Asperger's was portrayed/dealt with. I thought some aspects of the characterization were done ok, but it was inconsistent. Plus, here was what appeared to be an upper-middle income family who had access to (or could pay for) a special school and at home therapist. Most families don't have that level of support, or again, can't pay for it.


That's why it was strange when Max went back to "mainstream" school and didn't appear to have any aides or special ed teachers he saw at least on a part time basis. They mentioned that he went to a social skills group, but that was it.

I also wish they hadn't had his former aide sleep with his uncle. First, most people don't date their doctors in real life, but if they're young and attractive they often do on TV. They did the same kind of thing with Jabbar's new doc.

Edited by emace, May 1, 2012 @ 6:52 PM.

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#205

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Posted May 1, 2012 @ 9:28 PM

Post-partum depression got really popular on t.v. for awhile, after the whole Brooke Shields/Tom Cruise debacle.
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#206

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Posted May 1, 2012 @ 11:08 PM

I also wish they hadn't had his former aide sleep with his uncle.

If I recall correctly, she was still his aide when she slept his uncle. And to choose that uncle? Sheesh!
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#207

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Posted May 2, 2012 @ 7:40 AM

That's why it was strange when Max went back to "mainstream" school and didn't appear to have any aides or special ed teachers he saw at least on a part time basis. They mentioned that he went to a social skills group, but that was it.


In the first episode after Max went to the new school, they showed him having tremendous difficulties in the classroom, with things like not being able to keep quiet while the teacher or other kids were talking. The teacher reminded him repeatedly, but he seemed unable to behave differently.

Then, there was another episode a while later, where they showed how Max didn't have any friends at school, forcing his first-grade cousin Jabbar to sit with him at lunch. When Jabbar wanted to spend time with his own friends, Max flipped out, screaming and physically attacking Jabbar.

The thing that bugged me most about the latter was how they just focused on Max needing to apologize to Jabbar (which was a huge deal, because Max didn't think he had done anything wrong, and could not be made to understand why an apology was in order). There was NO mention of the stark plain fact that Max is an adolescent, while Jabbar is SIX -- in his fury, he could seriously have injured a small child. Now, I totally get that Max has his issues and doesn't always think like others. But really, IMO this is a big, big, BIG thing to stress. Max normally likes Jabbar, so it shouldn't have been all that hard to make him understand he could have really hurt him. And if he didn't understand that, well, make him learn to understand it. Tell him, show him, explain, as many times and in as many ways as necessary til it sinks in! Before long, Max will be a full-grown man with full-grown strength; he can't just go into a hissy fit whenever he doesn't get his way and start attacking people.
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#208

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Posted May 2, 2012 @ 11:53 AM

In the first episode after Max went to the new school, they showed him having tremendous difficulties in the classroom, with things like not being able to keep quiet while the teacher or other kids were talking. The teacher reminded him repeatedly, but he seemed unable to behave differently.


Amber was so good with him following the fight with Jabbar, they should have kept that plotline rather than having her almost sleep with her campaign boss. Not as dramatic, I guess.

Max does need to learn more self-control IMO, but his dad is a very poor role model, slugging a stranger in the store and then getting physical with Crosby. Double standards really affect the way kids act, regardless of whether they have a disability.
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#209

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Posted May 2, 2012 @ 1:01 PM

Another thing with Max is that he DOES understand cause and effect, and how things are supposed to go -- just not when it's inconvenient for him. For example, he's done some awful things in the past season or two, and then nobody wants to punish him because he "doesn't understand." But then there are times when his big sister Haddie goes on a yelling streak, or does something, and Max immediately starts yelling, "Haddie's not supposed to do that! Is she in trouble?? Haddie needs to be punished!" etc. So it seems quite clear he understands. His parents need to stop tiptoeing around him. Having Asperger's doesn't mean getting a free pass to do whatever you want.
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#210

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Posted May 2, 2012 @ 2:19 PM

Not all Aspies are mathematical geniuses who talk like robots

The speech thing is what I was most familiar with from my own experience so that made it most realistic (again, only based on my experiences). My son was completely non-vocal until 5 and when he did start to speak it was both very infrequent and very robotic. It took years before his speech became more fluid. Granted, the other children with Aspies/autism I knew were either non-vocal (or extremely limited) or their speech patterns were not noticeably atypical.

Another thing with Max is that he DOES understand cause and effect, and how things are supposed to go -- just not when it's inconvenient for him

Consistency is a huge issue for children, but especially children with autism/Asperger's. So the inconsistent application of rules would be extra difficult for them. Of course, that consistency would make it so much easier on the entire family. Overall, I found that particular family in Parenthood to be so off putting that I could not watch many of the episodes despite my interest in seeing how Asperger's was represented and a residual crush on Peter Krause from Sports Night and Six Feet Under.

Can someone give me a round up of characters and shows that have a character with diagnosed Asperger's or autism? NMdum1 cited a couple of them, but they are not shows I'm familiar with so was unaware.

Also I would appreciate any characters/shows that have a character who consistently behaves in an Asperger's/autism like manner without being labeled as such. Again, NMdum1 has already cited Seven of Nine from Star Trek Voyager.
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