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School Life on TV


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#601

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Posted Jul 10, 2012 @ 2:46 AM

On 90210, Brenda majored in drama, Kelly majored in psychology, Donna majored in fashion design, Dylan majored in english lit, and I think Brandon majored in political science.


Hmm, I'm not sure if I'm making this up or not, but I want to say that Clare on 90210 majored in something science-y.

Actually, this reminds me, it always cracks me up how characters in their first year (or even semester) of University take all those typical Psych 101 or Poli Sci 101 classes, but by their second year they're taking these really advanced seminars, working on a really intense thesis, etc.

#602

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Posted Jul 10, 2012 @ 1:54 PM

I thought tv students interested in literature/arts is actually more common. While there are TONS of doctor shows, we never actually see those characters study medicine in school (except for interns).


On soap operas, a character can go from being a nobody on the street to a doctor in less than a year, without, apparently, every attending a class. Apparently all they need to do is start working as an intern.

#603

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Posted Jul 10, 2012 @ 4:47 PM

Yeah, but on soap operas people also go from being cute toddlers to 18-year-old ingenues or shirtless hunks in less than a year, so it's not as if Med School is the only place where timing is wonky.

#604

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Posted Jul 10, 2012 @ 8:28 PM

At least as of 10 years ago, that was pretty true to real life. Maybe not quite the disdain for state universities, depending on your state, (and University of X was always preferable to X State University), but certainly community college was scoffed at, and the goal was to go places.


This is true even if (as many TV students do) you attend high school in California, where two of the state schools are among the top schools in the country. It REALLY bothered me in Veronica Mars they had a bunch of episodes about how if Veronica didn't get the Kane Scholarship (the only scholarship in the whole wide world, apparently) she would never go to Stanford and would be stuck in Neptune forever. Never mind she had the second highest GPA in her class, worked two jobs, was being raised by a single parent (meaning she would be eligible for all sorts of loans and grants) and, oh yeah, caught a world-famous murderer in a high-profile case that made the cover of People. Even if she couldn't swing Stanford with 100% of her tuition and living expenses covered, she could have definitely done it for Berkeley.

Because all the good universities are private, and all the bad ones are state schools. There's no such thing as, say, UVA or University of Illinois or Texas. And there's no such thing as expensive liberal arts colleges no one's ever heard of.

TV has taught me there's only ONE college, or ONE scholarship, and if you don't get it you're going to spend the rest of your life in your small town as a gas station attendant/diner waitress. And you deserve said college/scholarship, and if you don't get it it's not because they're extremely competitive, but because evil rich people in your town want to sabotage you. There also aren't government loans or grants. This is why so many small town girls with big dreams have to put themselves through school by stripping.

#605

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Posted Jul 11, 2012 @ 1:52 PM

Glee has taught me that if you can't get a football scholarship to Ohio State, you can't get a football scholarship to any other school in the country.

#606

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Posted Jul 13, 2012 @ 5:40 PM

Glee has taught me that if you can't get a football scholarship to Ohio State, you can't get a football scholarship to any other school in the country.


Also according to Glee, there is only one performing arts school in New York City to apply to.

#607

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Posted Jul 14, 2012 @ 3:08 PM

TV has taught me that women who run / work out need nothing more than a standard thin strapped sports bra, regardless of their chest size.

#608

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Posted Jul 15, 2012 @ 4:34 AM

Alaric on The Vampire Diaries was a history teacher and I could see at least one of those kids pursuing that.


It also worked for what Alaric was really doing in town. It made perfect sense to me that this vampire hunter was a History teacher and not say a math teacher. Giles and Wesley from Buffy had similar professions that worked for covers considering what they actually were as well.

Also according to Glee, there is only one performing arts school in New York City to apply to.



And if you don't get in you will never make it in Hollywood. Ha!

#609

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Posted Jul 15, 2012 @ 8:47 AM

Glee has taught me that if you can't get a football scholarship to Ohio State, you can't get a football scholarship to any other school in the country

Well to be fair if you are an Ohio high school football player then The Ohio State University football team is the only one that counts. It's not about the "scholarship", because school is not about education. Everywhere else is either second rate on your run to the NFL dream or you are selling out the home for a better deal as you have already started as a sports professional. In some areas you will have competition, say the border areas between Alabama and Auburn in Alabama. A Louisville native in choosing between Louisville and Kentucky for basketball......In Los Angeles UCLA, if you play basketball but USC if you play football

#610

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Posted Jul 15, 2012 @ 2:34 PM

There are some people on TV who are non-liberal arts majors, but they're almost always "pre-med."

#611

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Posted Jul 23, 2012 @ 7:52 AM

Because all the good universities are private, and all the bad ones are state schools. There's no such thing as, say, UVA or University of Illinois or Texas. And there's no such thing as expensive liberal arts colleges no one's ever heard of.

I live in CT, where Gilmore Girls supposedly was. Many, many people - I'd even say most - either go to UConn or else one of the four CSU (Connecticut State University) schools, Central, Western, Southern or Eastern. Despite our proximity to Yale, the sad reality is, that's just plain not attainable for 90% of students.

Yet according to GG, if you didn't go to Yale or Harvard, you might as well just kill yourself. Now, I know that Rory attended a snooty private school, so that crowd gets a bit of a hand-wave. But I recall TPTB having Rory run into her ex-boyfriend, and when she and Dean were catching up, he said he was going to Southern, and they totally made it sound like he was buying a degree from the back of a van or something. SOUTHERN IS A PERFECTLY GOOD SCHOOL!

#612

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Posted Jul 23, 2012 @ 2:43 PM

In soaps, all college students who live on the East Coast go to Stanford, and are never seen again.

#613

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 9:15 AM

Yet according to GG, if you didn't go to Yale or Harvard, you might as well just kill yourself.


The thing is that even Yale and Harvard are not the hardest schools in the US to get into anymore. They are certainly up there, but ranking-wise, there are other schools which beat the Ivies in annual lists. Some are schools that will never get mentioned in TV-land, too.

Also, just being valedictorian is not enough to get you in. Just in TV land.

Edited by emace, Jul 24, 2012 @ 9:17 AM.


#614

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 3:03 PM

The thing is that even Yale and Harvard are not the hardest schools in the US to get into anymore.

I know, right? You're lucky to get a show where the smart people go to the (more competitive) Berkeley or MIT. Never mind, say, the journalism programs at Syracuse or Washington University, despite that everyone on TV wants to be a reporter.

Also, just being valedictorian is not enough to get you in. Just in TV land.

Oddly, though, it's the opposite for getting scholarships or loans. On TV land, those are virtually impossible. You can be first or second in your class, have made a name for yourself in some sort of creative field and done a lot of work in the community, like all poor-yet-smart TV teens, and you get no financial help whatsoever to go to your dream school. You never consider taking extra years to complete your degree while you work.

Your only choices are attending the local community college, drug dealing, stripping, or murder. Combining the latter two is a popular choice.

(Stripping and murder are also the primary way hot women pay for medical and law school. Never mind that by then you have your undergraduate degree and should be able to land a legitimate job, often in your field).

#615

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 3:03 PM

The thing is that even Yale and Harvard are not the hardest schools in the US to get into anymore. They are certainly up there, but ranking-wise, there are other schools which beat the Ivies in annual lists.

There's aren't that many. The ivies and similar have some of the lowest acceptance rates of great/non specialized schools in the country:
Schools with the lowest acceptance rates

Oddly, though, it's the opposite for getting scholarships or loans. On TV land, those are virtually impossible.

True, tv land only focuses on merit scholarships, and forget that many schools, particularly the elite universities give massive grants. Like, none of the Ivies dole out money on a merit basis (otherwise, everyone would have to get money by virtue of being accepted) and they all give grants on a need basis.

Edited by IvyDarling, Jul 24, 2012 @ 3:09 PM.


#616

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 4:10 PM

One wonders how difficult it is to get into Hudson University. It seems like all of the students there are murderers or victims.

#617

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 9:10 PM

It's probably easy. They have all that vacant space, what with everyone dying and being arrested and therefore no longer enrolled.

#618

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 10:44 PM

I wonder what Hudson University's promotional material must look like: "You only have a 1 in 6 chance getting murdered!"

#619

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Posted Jul 25, 2012 @ 9:06 AM

Small class sizes and a vigorous work-study plan (your choice of whore or stripper). Tuition waivers for students who survive to junior year.

#620

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Posted Jul 25, 2012 @ 12:18 PM

Another buring Hudson University question- if your roommate is murdered or arrested for murder, can you get automatic A grades for the semester under the 'undue academic stress' clause?

#621

Alexandria Bay

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Posted Jul 25, 2012 @ 1:27 PM

But then the grading curve would be a flat line because everyone who's left would get an A.

That could be another selling point--Come to Hudson University, where a 4.0 is guaranteed.*

*Student must meet minimum requirements to qualify: Must be matriculated, not a murderer, alive at time of course completion.

Edited by Alexandria Bay, Jul 25, 2012 @ 1:31 PM.


#622

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Posted Jul 27, 2012 @ 1:47 PM

I wonder if Hudson has a correspondence program for all their jailed students so that they can complete their degrees right from prison.

#623

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Posted Jul 28, 2012 @ 1:55 AM

I'm sure the inmates can use the computer in the library to complete their degrees online.

#624

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Posted Jul 28, 2012 @ 7:54 AM

Hudson University's Administration Office is also known as the City of New York Department of Corrections.

#625

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Posted Aug 5, 2012 @ 1:00 PM

I wish they'd do a show based loosely on John Knowles' A Separate Peace. I think it would be interesting to see a period boarding school series.

#626

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Posted Aug 6, 2012 @ 12:30 AM

Masterpiece Theater once aired to Serve Them All My Days, it is available on DVD

#627

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Posted Aug 8, 2012 @ 10:23 AM

I wish they'd do a show based loosely on John Knowles' A Separate Peace. I think it would be interesting to see a period boarding school series.

I don't think A Separate Peace could be adapted into an ongoing TV series, but a boys' boarding school in general would be a great idea. They've done movies and plays about that (Like The History Boys), but never a TV show that I can think of. What with everyone loving Downton Abbey and Mad Men and other shows about rich people in the past, it seems like a definite winner.

I have a question. Given that everyone in the TV-watching world knows that a show set in a high school will suck like a chest wound when the characters graduate and go to college (or the working world), why do they KEEP HAVING THEIR HIGH SCHOOL CHARACTERS GRADUATE? Buffy, Veronica Mars, That '70s Show, even Saved By The Bell: they graduate, the quality of the show goes WAY WAY down. You have to destroy half the characters to have them end up in the same place, a few characters need to be shoehorned in every episode in ways that increasingly make no sense, since you have new characters enter without having old ones leave the cast becomes so bloated no storyline or character can be developed properly.

So, why do it? Why not have 11th grade last 3 seasons, 12th grade last 3 seasons, and by then the show is over. You also wouldn't have to retcon that these characters are driving and getting the lead in the school play and having lots of independence from parents and active sex lives when they're sophomores, which always bugged me. Seriously, why has no one ever done that? Sure the actors would age, but given that you cast 25-year-olds to play high school students I think we can all handle it. I'm seeing lots of upside and no downside.

#628

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Posted Aug 8, 2012 @ 10:34 AM

So, why do it? Why not have 11th grade last 3 seasons, 12th grade last 3 seasons, and by then the show is over.


You know I have always said the same thing. That it was insane to have high school kids graduate knowing it would be the end of the show as it once was. But I kind of get it now. Pretty Little Liars uses this method. So that the first two seasons were really only something like six months. And it does get pretty grating. There are huge "epic" love stories that begin, progress and crash. But really the time period could only possibly be a matter of weeks eventhough it takes place over two seasons. It really is very distracting. One character is mourning her dead lover but the way the timeline works they were barely together, at all.

And it is tough to stick to the timeline. Issues like what year is it? It throws everything off when they mention a current event.

Edited by Cherith, Aug 8, 2012 @ 10:35 AM.


#629

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Posted Aug 8, 2012 @ 10:37 AM

The traditional broadcast network schedule of 22 episodes did seem to follow the calender but now with basic cable networks 10 episode seasons that prejudice seems to have been cut. Isn't Royal Pains about to go into its forth season following that first summer in the Hamptons for Hank med. When kids are hired they might age out. When you start with a 30 year old like on Andrea on Beverly Hills or Grace of Joan of Arcadia maybe you can get away with it.

#630

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Posted Aug 8, 2012 @ 10:51 AM

And it is tough to stick to the timeline. Issues like what year is it? It throws everything off when they mention a current event.


I forgot this earlier, but Grey's Anatomy did the first year of the casts' internship taking place over 3 seasons. Other than only having one Christmas episode, I didn't notice any problems. (I stopped watching after the episode where Christina married Isaiah Washington's character. Maybe it got worse). I can see what you're saying about relationships that last one season really only lasting a few months. I think I'd rather have that than season 3 of Veronica Mars though.

Maybe shows could stretch it out by having a season or 2 set in the summer. Has anyone ever done that?

Edited by clear, Aug 8, 2012 @ 10:52 AM.