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Happy Days: Where the Shark was First Jumped


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#451

Mystery

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Posted Jan 10, 2013 @ 3:52 AM

Rachel Maddow was running the Jumping the Shark footage in connection with her discussion of the relevance or irrelevance of the NRA in these current gun control. Ah, Fonzie in his leather jacket and shorts. On water skis.
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#452

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Posted Jan 13, 2013 @ 9:16 AM

A couple of days ago, I happened across the episode where Richie joins the Young Democrats to get closer to a cute blonde and staunch Republican Howard ends up with Stevenson bumper stickers all over the back of his DeSoto. And, of course, Fonzie likes Ike! The first season was so different from the later years -- the film quality, the sets, everything.
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#453

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Posted Jan 13, 2013 @ 2:57 PM

Some people prefer the single camera show as opposed to the later three camera set up in front of a studio audience. Garry Marshall said he liked the first season too because of the artistic quality. I don't know. I liked some of the first season episodes but I admit to having there was just so much more energy and fun with the audience. "The Fonz wants to dance!" speech being my favorite moment of the show because of that.
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#454

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Posted Jan 13, 2013 @ 3:40 PM

I saw a 'Happy Days' episode this evening that I don't think I've seen in years and years. It was the one where Richie had to check out the haunted house where they were going to have their Halloween party. Those scenes were pretty good, but I had forgotten one of my favorite ones. It was where Howard was at home giving out the candy and apples. A little girl comes to the door dressed as a fairy princess. Howard just oohs and aahs over her and her costume. He says that he has something special for her. (That sounds really creepy, doesn't it, especially since he asked the little boy who was at the door a few minutes before if he could have a kiss for the candy he had given him!) Anyway, he takes one of the big shiny red apples and drops it into her bag. Kerplunk! She looks down into the bag, then looks up with a mean expression on her face. 'You broke my cookie, you big ox!' Loved it!

I remember that episode, and in addition to that scene, I remember the scene where Marion insists on inspecting the kids' unwrapped Halloween goodies to make sure they didn't have razor blades or needles that had been put into them by crazy people (this was a HUGE concern back in the mid-to-late 70s). Howard protested by saying that the stuff the Cunninghams had given out hadn't been wrapped, whereupon Marion replied, without missing a beat, "Yes, but I know that we're not crazy, Howard!"
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#455

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Posted Jan 13, 2013 @ 4:20 PM

I look at Happy Days as one of those shows that I watched back then because it was on and everyone watched it. I thought then and now that Ron Howard was the reason to watch, period. When Ron Howard left the show, I watched when he made a guest appearance the following year, and when he returned for the finale. I look at the show now and I can barely tolerate the screaming for Fonzie or Chachi and the fact that they didn't even try to pretend that it was the 50's is so obvious. I certainly respect all the work that went into the show for all those years, but for me, it just doesn't hold up without Ron Howard. Guess you can tell I'm a fan of his..
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#456

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Posted Jan 14, 2013 @ 1:18 AM

I knew when or more precisely when Tom Bosley didn't care if it was the 50's or even the 60's. He was wearing a silver digital watch. It was the one where you had to actually push the button on the side to get the time. That's when I knew he had jumped the shark even before the term became a term. Obviously, he wanted to know when it was time to cash his check.

Edited by ByaNose, Jan 14, 2013 @ 1:19 AM.

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#457

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Posted Jan 14, 2013 @ 3:26 AM

I never noticed the digital watch but I did note him wearing tinted glasses in the later seasons was definitely anachronistic.

My theory is when Chachi came on board Garry Marshall wanted to keep Scott Baio's late 70s haircut because he was a teen idol. He let the other guys like Ron, Anson Williams and Donny Most grow their hair a little longer so it wouldn't look weird even though it was wrong for the period which would be the early 60s.
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#458

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Posted Jan 14, 2013 @ 1:40 PM

I was in high school when this show started and it was HUGE (but we only had three channels to choose from so that probably had something to do with it). I don't think it would have that kind of success today.

A little girl comes to the door dressed as a fairy princess. Howard just oohs and aahs over her and her costume.

I think she was Tom Bosley's real daughter. She has an acting credit for the show as "trick or treat girl."

"The Fonz wants to dance!" speech

Even Fonzie had his limits on what he would tolerate from the Cunninghams.

One of my favorite scenes is from the episode where Fonz and Joanie were in the dance marathon and he clinched the win for them by doing the Russian dance. He wears me out just watching him. It was obvious Henry loved doing it and was pleased with himself for how well he did it.
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#459

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Posted Jan 15, 2013 @ 9:47 AM

I remember that episode, and in addition to that scene, I remember the scene where Marion insists on inspecting the kids' unwrapped Halloween goodies to make sure they didn't have razor blades or needles that had been put into them by crazy people (this was a HUGE concern back in the mid-to-late 70s). Howard protested by saying that the stuff the Cunninghams had given out hadn't been wrapped, whereupon Marion replied, without missing a beat, "Yes, but I know that we're not crazy, Howard!"


I wondered about that scene. Was it supposed to be some type of PSA about the dangers of Halloween candy from strangers? My trick-or-treating years would have been in the very late 1960s and maybe a little into the early 70s. I don't remember if we ever even got unwrapped candy, but I know that we had no problems digging into the candy that we got from total strangers. It never even occurred to us that somebody would be tampering with the candy. Those were good times!

Also, I didn't know that the fairy princess in the Halloween episode was Bosley's real-life daughter. How cute!
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#460

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Posted Jan 15, 2013 @ 11:24 AM

I'm thinking that in the Cunninghams' day, children would typically have trick-or-treated in their own neighborhoods, and that was still during a time when mothers were home and everyone generally knew their neighbors fairly well. Thus why all the candy concerns?

In other news, last week Henry Winkler tweeted about how his household loves Downton Abbey. That just struck me as hilarious. If the Fonz likes a British period drama, then hey, EVERYONE will...
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#461

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Posted Jan 15, 2013 @ 11:31 AM

I wondered about that scene. Was it supposed to be some type of PSA about the dangers of Halloween candy from strangers? My trick-or-treating years would have been in the very late 1960s and maybe a little into the early 70s. I don't remember if we ever even got unwrapped candy, but I know that we had no problems digging into the candy that we got from total strangers. It never even occurred to us that somebody would be tampering with the candy. Those were good times!

My trick or treating years were probably mid-60s through to early 70s and I do remember by the late 60s early 70s that my parents went through our bag before we were allowed to have it and that unwrapped candy got thrown out. I don't think though this was a concern in the time that Happy Days was set so that scene always struck me as odd too. I can remember trick or treating (as a very small child) around 1964 and we were still getting stuff like home made candy apples and caramel balls and cookies and the like.
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#462

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Posted Jan 15, 2013 @ 1:07 PM

I remember as a little kid in the 70's that someone was putting razor blades in apples and it freaked everyone out about accepting Halloween candy - even if it was from your neighbors.

I was just explaining to my teenage son about the origins of 'jumping the shark'. I promised him, we'd watch some old episodes of Happy Days. I never missed an episode.
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#463

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Posted Jan 15, 2013 @ 1:38 PM

One of my favorite scenes is from the episode where Fonz and Joanie were in the dance marathon and he clinched the win for them by doing the Russian dance.


Mine, too! If he'd lost the marathon, he would've been forced to get a crewcut, and no-one touches the Fonz's hair. (Although I bet he would've made a crewcut look good.) The girl who made the crewcut bet was played by Charlene Tilton, later Lucy on Dallas.
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#464

vera charles

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Posted Jan 21, 2013 @ 7:03 PM

Tom Bosley didn't care if it was the 50's or even the 60's. He was wearing a silver digital watch. It was the one where you had to actually push the button on the side to get the time.

My eighth grade science teacher had one of those in 1975. If we were really good in class, he'd push the button and let us see the time. Ah, those were the days.

One of the main differences in early seasons vs. later seasons is that the early ones at least tried to look like the 1950's. Later on, it was 70's all the way.
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#465

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Posted Jan 21, 2013 @ 10:40 PM

One thing I loved about the first two seasons was watching the latest girlfriend Richie was dating or trying to date. Pretty girls, some more than others, but overall they all were attractive. It was such a shock to me to see him end up with Lori Beth. No offense, she was okay, but compared to all the other girls Richie dated, I didn't like the Lori Beth character. I always wish another actress was chosen to play the part. I always liked Linda Purl when she played his girlfriend, Gloria. I found her to be so cute and pretty. It was crazy when she did return to the show years later and ended up as the girlfriend of Fonzie. Of course she was playing a different character.

I have been wondering the name of an actress that appeared several times in the early seasons. There is one actress who appeared in the episode, The Deadly Dares. She was the girl who Fonzie ended up dancing with right after he danced with Richie when he was dressed up as a girl. She was also the girl who Fonzie was making out with when she and Fonzie went to Richie's apartment to make-out. She was also making out with Fonzie in her car at Inspiration Point when Richie was trying to find Joanie and Spike after losing them at the movies. She later appeared in the episode where cousin Angie tries to break a world record. She is sitting on Richie's shoulder as he tries to break a world record. Does anyone know the name of this actress?
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#466

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Posted Jan 22, 2013 @ 10:40 AM

Some good episodes on last night- the one with Laverne & Shirley (although they cut the part where Marion complained about the old man at the grocery store always hitting her cart), Fonzie playing the bongos, and Johnny Fish & the Fins. I love that these are all pre-shark jumping.
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#467

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Posted Jan 23, 2013 @ 1:16 PM

I have memories (maybe slightly vague) of watching Happy Days growing up. Watching them again as an adult has truly surprised me. I find myself laughing out loud! It's funny that the show has really stood the test of time. The characters are all so darned likable.
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#468

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Posted Jan 23, 2013 @ 5:47 PM

I could not STAND Lori Beth. If memory serves, she had a really drone-y voice that got on my nerves.
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#469

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Posted Jan 24, 2013 @ 11:33 AM

I didn't mind her but was surprised she ended up being the one Richie married.

The third and fourth seasons(1975-1977) are definitely my favorite. Post single camera and pre-"Jump the Shark". Those studio audience episodes are so fun(especially without Chachi) and Ron Howard really showed how good a comic performer he can be. Yesterday I watched the one where Richie gets bullied by two greasers and tries to learn self defense. He tries to learn karate from Arnold(Mr Miyagi) and learns how to sound threatening from Fonzie. He goes to fight the guy in Arnolds and Fonz agrees to stay out of it so Richie can fight his own battles. Richie going back and forth between facing the guy and consulting the Fonz sitting in a booth was so hilarious! "This isn't working Fonz! Why isn't this working?" Another great bit is when Richie tells him in a tough guy voice "When I turn around you guys better be gone!" and Ralph and Potsie run away from their booth! Also the guy's friend is played by Jeff Conaway! I guess he was cast because he played Danny in Grease onstage(and would play Kinickie in the movie).

Edited by Sighandeyeroll, Jan 24, 2013 @ 11:42 AM.

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#470

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Posted Jan 24, 2013 @ 1:10 PM

I love that episode! They chop it up too much in syndication. My favorite line is: "She flipped me during class, she flipped me after class, she flipped me all the way home!" There were other great lines, like them calling Richie "Bing Bong" and Ralph repeating, "Leave the little basky."

The other tough guy recently showed up on The Big Bang Theory as Howard's dentist and his mother's lover.

Edited by Runningwild, Jan 24, 2013 @ 1:12 PM.

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#471

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Posted Jan 24, 2013 @ 1:49 PM

The other tough guy recently showed up on The Big Bang Theory as Howard's dentist and his mother's lover.


He was in the later Happy Days episode with the demolition derby as one of the Malachi Brothers. Looking him up on IMDB his name is Ken Lerner. He's one of those character actors where you don't know the name but you definitely recognize his face and voice. Like he was Principal Flutie on the first season of Buffy The Vampire Slayer and the guy Arnold stabs in the back with a pen in The Running Man!

Edited by Sighandeyeroll, Jan 24, 2013 @ 1:49 PM.

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#472

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Posted Jan 29, 2013 @ 1:14 PM

He was in the later Happy Days episode with the demolition derby as one of the Malachi Brothers.


Those episodes were on Hallmark yesterday. Arnold's gone and Al has replaced him. I guess we'll be jumping the shark before too long.
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#473

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Posted Feb 1, 2013 @ 6:53 PM

Just watched it. I forgot Lorne Greene had a cameo as himself. It was great because he looked just the same way in 1977 as he did in 1960 or whatever year the episode is set in when he was on Bonanza!

The actual jumping the shark moment didn't bug me as a kid but seeing it now I can see how silly it looks. What did annoy me then and still does is Potsie singing "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow" at that beach campfire. Ugh. Anson Williams could really take a good song like that and totally make it awful.

Edited by Sighandeyeroll, Feb 1, 2013 @ 7:01 PM.

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#474

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Posted Feb 2, 2013 @ 11:15 AM

legaleagle44:

I remember that episode, and in addition to that scene, I remember the scene where Marion insists on inspecting the kids' unwrapped Halloween goodies to make sure they didn't have razor blades or needles that had been put into them by crazy people (this was a HUGE concern back in the mid-to-late 70s). Howard protested by saying that the stuff the Cunninghams had given out hadn't been wrapped, whereupon Marion replied, without missing a beat, "Yes, but I know that we're not crazy, Howard!"


I think the big concern there was fruit more so than candy. Kids were supposed to bring the fruit home and have their parents cut it open with a knife. As a kid waiting wasn't a big deal, because when I went Trick or Treating, I was more interested in candy than fruit. But yeah, back then children had to be real careful when Trick or Treating. Those were the days when we used pillow cases instead of Trick or Treat bags, and the neighboring towns had Trick or Treat on different nights, so some kids would just go from town to town. When they were all done they could have opened their own candy stores.

Back on topic. My favorite episode of all time, is the Christmas episode when they were putting out the mechanical Santa Claus. My memory is a little fuzzy on all of the details, I haven't seen the episode in such a long time, and I hate watching episodes in syndication, because I can tell where the gaps are from the original broadcast. I think that was the episode where Fonzie was at his most vulnerable, early on in the series. Richie sees Fonzie eating alone in the garage, so he finds away to bring him home to the Cunningham household so Fonzie wouldn't be alone for Christmas.

Not a big fan of the Chachi years with the neckerchief tied around his leg. It looked really really stupid. And don't even get me started on Joanie loves Chachi.

Edited by bumblehare74, Feb 2, 2013 @ 11:16 AM.

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#475

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Posted Feb 2, 2013 @ 11:53 AM

Even Fonzie had his limits on what he would tolerate from the Cunninghams.

And vice versa. Marion in particular would often call Fonzie out whenever she felt he'd gone too far, and she was the only one who could ever shut him down and get away with it.

Howard even called Fonzie out once when Fonzie insulted Marion because she'd inadvertently blabbed a secret of his (Fonzie went around telling everyone that she had "loose lips," which caused everyone to shun her) by reminding him of all the nice things that she had done for him over the years.

Although he rarely admitted it, Fonzie had a great deal of respect for "Mr. and Mrs. C." They were, after all, the closest thing he'd ever really had to parents, and they did, in fact, become his godparents at his request, when he decided to get baptized.

And to show the depth of his real feelings for the Cunninghams, consider the episode where Richie had been seriously injured and was lying comatose in the hospital. Fonzie had been sitting alone with him, and because nobody at that point was certain that Richie was going to make it, Fonzie started praying for God to heal Richie because he was terrified of losing his best friend. It's a very touching, heartfelt scene that ends with Fonzie sobbing as he's begging God to save Richie. Henry Winkler sold the hell out of that scene, in my opinion, and it's what convinces me that underneath the "cool" outward bravado, Fonzie always possessed a heart of gold, and that he'd easily have taken a bullet for any of the Cunninghams.

Edited by legaleagle44, Feb 3, 2013 @ 10:55 AM.

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#476

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Posted Feb 2, 2013 @ 9:39 PM

Back on topic. My favorite episode of all time, is the Christmas episode when they were putting out the mechanical Santa Claus. My memory is a little fuzzy on all of the details, I haven't seen the episode in such a long time, and I hate watching episodes in syndication, because I can tell where the gaps are from the original broadcast. I think that was the episode where Fonzie was at his most vulnerable, early on in the series. Richie sees Fonzie eating alone in the garage, so he finds away to bring him home to the Cunningham household so Fonzie wouldn't be alone for Christmas.


I had totally forgotten about that episode! I remember now that the Santa was whacking everyone with his arm instead of waiving or something. And Richie (or maybe Howard) said something about their Santa Claus mugging the neighbors.

Does anyone remember which episode this quote came from? Howard: 'I didn't just fall off the turnip truck, you know.' Marion: 'You did once, Howard.' That exchange still makes me laugh, and it's probably been twenty years since I've seen whatever episode it came from.
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#477

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 12:31 AM

Wow reading this thread has brought back some great memories. I have always been afraid of going back to watch older shows because usually when I do I am disappointed. Case in point, LA Law (seems really superficial and lame today) and Miami Vice - seems really poorly shot (the exciting colors I remember from college in the 80s seem washed out and dull - did they leave the negatives out in the sun?).
I still had a crush on Pinky Tuskadarrow (sp?)
One thing this show always did was make me happy just hearing the theme song come on and play. Do you remember the good old days when shows actually had theme songs that would play for almost a minute? Nowadays, it is just a quick note or two with the principle's names thrown up and on to the first scene.
I miss the Happy Days, Laverne & Shirley, and Love Boat days of TV. I really do.
I will have to find some older Happy Days episodes online to watch.
PS.
Does anyone remember the show when the guys got swindled into renting the front porch of a house for the week? There were hot girls staying in the house and for some reason the guys put on the act that they were Tunisian Camel jockeys! I cannot for the life of me remember why.
I do slightly remember one of the guys trying to count in Tunisian - "Ick, mock, kloon, lock, quinum" I must have been starved for entertainment back in the day.

Edited by junebug630, Feb 3, 2013 @ 12:35 AM.

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#478

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 3:23 AM

And to show the depth of his real feelings for the Cunninghams, consider the episode where Richie had been seriously injured and was lying comatose in the hospital. Fonzie had been sitting alone with him, and because nobody at that point was certain that Richie was going to make it, Fonzie started praying for God to heal Richie because he's terrified of losing his best friend. It's a very touching, heartfelt scene that ends with Fonzie sobbing as he's begging God to save Richie. Henry Winkler sold the hell out of that scene, in my opinion, and it's what convinces me that underneath the "cool" outward bravado, Fonzie always possessed a heart of gold, and that he'd easily have taken a bullet for any of the Cunninghams.


Not a big fan of the Chachi years with the neckerchief tied around his leg. It looked really really stupid.


Garry Marshall talked about both in his book. He said he got a letter from like child psychologists or something asking him to do a story where Fonzie cries to show kids it's okay to show your emotions. That even someone as tough as Fonz could cry, so Marshall did it. Chachi tying that rag around his leg was Marshall wanting to start a trend. He thought kids everywhere would be copying Scott Baio by tying a neckerchief around one of their legs. "Shockingly" no one did. Both these examples show first the good part of having Marshall as a producer and the second the bad or at least, lame.
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#479

ubi

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 10:44 AM

My theory is when Chachi came on board Garry Marshall wanted to keep Scott Baio's late 70s haircut because he was a teen idol.

I thought he was teen idol because of this show, not before he was on it.
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#480

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Posted Feb 3, 2013 @ 3:34 PM

Does anyone remember the show when the guys got swindled into renting the front porch of a house for the week? There were hot girls staying in the house and for some reason the guys put on the act that they were Tunisian Camel jockeys! I cannot for the life of me remember why.



I think it had to do with trying to impress them. They were college girls and the boys were still in HS and knew they wouldn't have had a shot otherwise. Being "camel jockeys" made them appear exotic.


I do slightly remember one of the guys trying to count in Tunisian - "Ick, mock, kloon, lock, quinum"


Actually the counting words were supposedly American Indian words for numbers 1 through 5. Ralph's mom taught him that but even he had his doubts.
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