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You Bastards! TV Characters Who Got Killed


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#31

cal331

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 7:13 PM

Bill McNeal's death on NewsRadio was well-handled, with the remaining characters mourning and honoring him and his real-life portrayer. Phil Hartman's death is just about the saddest Hollywood death for me.
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#32

davidmello

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 7:14 PM

One thing you can say about Buffy...just because you died doesn't mean you're off the show....

Darla's the most obvious example. She gets dusted in season one, yet returns in a big way in season two of Angel, and plays a big part in season three with her surprise pregnancy

On the other hand, how many people shed a tear when Johnathan died in "Conversations with Dead People", right over the Hellmouth? Yet he came back, sort of, when the First took his form.

And I have to add the big battle in "Grad Day, part 2", where the Mayor turns into a dragon that eats Principal Snyder (clueless to the end), then gets blown up in the library.

Edited by davidmello, May 13, 2004 @ 7:15 PM.

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#33

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 7:46 PM

Adding to the 24 deaths (I know there are countless)...

George Mason's death in Day 2, though completely contrived, really got me. I was so pumped when he revealed himself on the plane and made Jack "Death Wish" Bauer give him the controls of the plane to destroy the bomb. I know he was going to die that day either way, but I'm glad he got to go down with guns blazing, especially considering what a jerk he basically was in Day 1.

Grandpa Walton (on The Waltons) was another character whose actor had really died, over the hiatus. The first episode back is simple and classy, with each character saying his or her quiet goodbye to Grandpa at his grave. Grandma, who on the show and in real life, was recovering from a stroke, says, "You live in us Old Man." Kleenex, please.

A show that I used to watch back in the day, Chicago Hope ripped my heart out of my chest when it killed off Birch (Peter MacNichol). I was so emotionally wrecked that I've essentially repressed it from my memory. What I do remember: he was really happy before he was killed, like with a baby and a girlfriend. I believe he was shot by a mugger. The kicker is that they make it seem like surgery went ok and he's gonna make it, but then he dies! GAWD! The whole episode was part of Mandy Patinkin leaving the show, but that was irrelevant to me after Birch died. Never could watch an episode after it.

With all due respect to the classic Chuckles the Clown, my favorite sitcom death, hands down, is Susie on Seinfeld. You could make a valid argument for the death of George's fiancee Susan (Susan's doctor on George's reaction: "I would describe it as 'restrained jubilation.'"), but I like the Susie episode better;scene for scene, it's got more laughs. The story: Elaine's co-worker thinks that Elaine is actually a woman named Susie. After awhile, Elaine gets tired of the Susie charade and says that Susie killed herself. Peterman, everyone show up for the Susie memorial. Elaine gives one of the worst eulogies, something along the lines of, "And also like me, Susie really like salad" and it just goes on and on. Peterman says he'll always fondly remember a wild night of passion he and Susie shared. Jerry, very proud of himself, tells Elaine's horrified co-worker that he's had sex with both Susie and Elaine. The kicker? Elaine is made chairwoman of the Susie foundation. Peterman tells her, "It will completely revolve around your schedule. Nights, weekends..." And the gravestone simply reads, "Susie."
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#34

Eris Rising

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 7:51 PM

With all due respect to the classic Chuckles the Clown, my favorite sitcom death, hands down, is Susie on Seinfeld. You could make a valid argument for the death of George's fiancee Susan (Susan's doctor on George's reaction: "I would describe it as 'restrained jubilation.'"), but I like the Susie episode better;scene for scene, it's got more laughs. The story: Elaine's co-worker thinks that Elaine is actually a woman named Susie. After awhile, Elaine gets tired of the Susie charade and says that Susie killed herself. Peterman, everyone show up for the Susie memorial. Elaine gives one of the worst eulogies, something along the lines of, "And also like me, Susie really like salad" and it just goes on and on. Peterman says he'll always fondly remember a wild night of passion he and Susie shared. Jerry, very proud of himself, tells Elaine's horrified co-worker that he's had sex with both Susie and Elaine. The kicker? Elaine is made chairwoman of the Susie foundation. Peterman tells her, "It will completely revolve around your schedule. Nights, weekends..." And the gravestone simply reads, "Susie."


Yeah, a truly great "death". However, the whole thing reminded me of the "Captain Tuttle" episode of M*A*S*H*. Hawkeye had taken to signing the name "Tuttle" on documents that he didn't want traced back to him (It was the name of the imaginary friend he blamed things on in his childhood). Eventually everyone wonders who this Tuttle is. Henry claims to be on good terms with him. Frank wants to know him. Hot Lips becomes attracted to him sight unseen.

Tuttle is finally "killed" before he's scheduled to appear at an awards ceremony. Hawkeye proceeds to give one of the funniest eulogies I've seen on camera.
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#35

bigmonster

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 8:21 PM

Jadzia Dax from DS9: while she left the show on her own accord, the way they wrote her death in the show was just stupid...


Word. I mean I understand why she left, I even understand why they had to kill her off (after she was married to Worf, it was the only way to get rid of her). But having Gul Dukat kill her seemed to be setting up a big death match between Dukat and Worf, which ultimately would have left us dissatisfied that Sisko didn't get to kill Dukat. Which would have sucked. Instead of Worf not getting to kill him, which totally did suck.

Also, I was highly upset when Tasha Yar was killed on ST:TNG, but later I realized that, yeah, they didn't need her.


I can see both sides of this, I thought Yar was boring in the first season. But with the exception of Data and Picard, they were all boring the first season. I would have loved to see her develop. I am with you, Ridha.

Harry Garibaldi on Hill Street Blues.


I thought this scene was so disturbing, like so many things on that show. Seeing that guy drive the hunting knife into him, hearing him gasp and scream...it was quite graphic. I had nightmares about it.

On the other hand, when Joe died it seemed pointless and almost incidental....Officer down!!! and then, *yawn!*

It's ironic that Garibaldi was on only a season and a half, and Joe Coffee was in the original cast.

Hawkeye proceeds to give one of the funniest eulogies I've seen on camera.


We all carry a part of him around in our hearts...in fact, you could probably say that all of us together made up Tuttle...

And here's my own: Crewman Daniels on Enterprise. Damn, does he not die every time he appears on screen?

They killed Daniels! Bastards!
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#36

mariear19

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 8:30 PM

I was sad when both Sam and Al died on One Life to Live . I liked both characters so I thought it was a waste. And I can't stand the storyline with Micheal and Marcie now so that just adds to my sadness.
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#37

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 8:41 PM

Speaking of M*A*S*H, the scene when Radar enters the OR and reads the bulletin announcing that Henry Blake's plane had been shot down, no survivors ... I get goosebumps just typing about it. War is hell!
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#38

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 8:47 PM

Chapelle's death on 24 was pretty unexpected. I kept screaming at my TV for something to happen that would stop it!
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#39

MetropolisGal

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 9:09 PM

TV deaths that pissed me off:

Joxer on "Xena: Warrior Princess". Just plain stupid. All so they can show Xena's boring ass daughter Eve/Livia as being bad-ass. Except NOT. And they killed off a good character to do it. Which is why we referred to The Powers That Be on that show as "The Idiots in Charge."

Also, killing off the majority of the Greek pantheon later that season. Hades, Hephaestus, Deimos - WTF??? I couldn't even watch the show after the episode "Twilight", not even for my sexy, sexy Ares.

Mrs. Landingham on "The West Wing". (Yeah, I heard they killed off Fitzwallace last night, but I haven't watched it in ages, therefore he's still alive in my universe.)

Romano on "ER".

And set the way-back machine for this one : Lt. Ironhorse on "War of the Worlds". First TV death that pissed me off and actually made me stop watching a TV show.
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#40

Neko

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 9:25 PM

Re: Tasha Yar's being killed. As I remember, Denise Crosby had second thoughts about being on the show. She felt that with such a large ensemble, her role wouldn't be given the screen time to develop and grow (in short, she was afraid that Yar would become part of the scenery, like Uhura). So she quit and did a Playboy spread soon afterward. And not a very much else, until they found ways to "resurrect" Yar (or variations thereof).

Now, why they had to kill the character, and not just transfer her off the ship, I don't know. Didn't they transfer Dr. Crusher to head Starfleet Medical when Gates McFadden wanted to explore her movie career (which career, as I recall, consisted of 1 line and a rather blurry appearance in The Hunt for Red October)? And, of course, transfered her back the following season?

I *can't* believe I remember this crap!

Edited by Neko, May 13, 2004 @ 9:28 PM.

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#41

Jeebus Cripes

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 9:32 PM

Wild Bill Hickock from Deadwood: Not a bad death plot-wise, but it came too early IMHO, as that was one of the characters I love from Deadwood and Keith Carradine was darned good at it.

Dude, I'm tearing up just thinking about it. I know he had to die, but couldn't they have stretched it out a bit longer? Like, say... never?

From the Buffyverse: Doyle, Anya, Lilah, & Cordy. They brought the snark and got killed for it. You BASTARDS! Although, towards the end Cordy was seriously sucking IMO. Still, I didn't want her dead, ya know?

Zhaan from Farscape. The show went on to do great things after her death, but I still felt it was lacking somewhat, without her presence.

Also, killing off the majority of the Greek pantheon later that season. Hades, Hephaestus, Deimos - WTF??? I couldn't even watch the show after the episode "Twilight", not even for my sexy, sexy Ares.

Word. As absurd as the show was, killing the gods has got to take the cake. I also have to add that I would have preferred if Gabrielle died and stayed dead.

Kenneth Irons from Witchblade. What a fucking travesty that was.

Edited by Jeebus Cripes, May 13, 2004 @ 10:36 PM.

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#42

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 9:38 PM

I have to go with Alice Garvey on Little House on the Prairie, not who died, but how she died, in a horrible fire.

I think of James from Good Times. That was sad. At 1st, I thought the actor had really died.
Henry Blake on M*A*S*H was sad and memorable. Especially since it was unexpected and I hear McLean cried for hours and the cast skipped the season ending party because they weren't in the mood.

And Edith Bunker on Archie Bunker's Place. That show went way too long. Imagine in early years of AITF saying she would die - that would have been totally unconvievable.
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#43

Charlotte

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 9:47 PM

Jen from Dawson's Creek

It should've been Dawson, y'all.
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#44

UnfamousLoser

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 9:50 PM

iMissEthan said:

And I think Said [Eamonn Walker] needed out for a movie role if I'm not mistaken. Wasn't it that piece of crap Bruce Willis thing (sorry I can't be more specific)?

Tears of the Sun.

Edited by UnfamousLoser, May 13, 2004 @ 9:52 PM.

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#45

Dani257

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 9:51 PM

Lets not forget Lucy on ER. The episode she died was one of the best episodes. Heh, I don't mean it that way, I liked Lucy, but the acting from everyone was spot on.
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#46

Eliot

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 9:53 PM

Chapelle's death on 24 was pretty unexpected. I kept screaming at my TV for something to happen that would stop it!


Chapelle's death really touched me. First, because I admire the show tremendously for not pulling some lameass stunt at the last minute to save him, and second, because the whole thing was so incredibly sad. He was so scared and yet so brave, but the thing that got me more than anything else was the fact that he had no one to call at the end. He told Jack the only people he felt close to were the people he worked with, and I was just like, "Dude, most of them hated you!" Excellent acting by Paul Schulze.

Chris Keller's second-story-no-way-could-that-have-really-killed-him swan dive? I'd been spoiled; I knew it was going to happen; I'd even seen the screen caps in advance...but it broke my heart. Even now, I can't bear to re-watch the finale. Cyril's death was also very sad, but I'm honestly torn between wishing it had happened the first time around (instead of the Governor's Batphone ringing at the last minute) and appreciating the irony of his ultimate execution and the toll the ordeal took on his entire family. I was, on the other hand, quite thrilled when Kenny Wangler took Frenchy's bullet.

The Henry Blake death was one of my earliest scarred-for-life moments. I think I had nightmares about it after.
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#47

rosiebloom

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 10:26 PM

Bobby Simone's death pissed me off mightily. He should have died with his boots on, but instead we were subjected to six weeks of Sipowitz-angst, tearful-worried-looking shots of Diane, inane "aren't we symbolic and deep" dream sequences with Burgess Meredith, and a sappy, new-agey ascent into heaven, all from a crime-show known for "grit." And just who was this "boy" who greeted him. Diane's three-week old miscarriage?
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#48

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 10:39 PM

Hey, I got there first a page or two ago! *grin*


Oh, wow, I'm stupid. I actually read the thread to see if anyone had mentioned it and missed the reference entirely. Sigh. But it was a really great episode.

Under deaths that have mightily pissed me off, I would add basically all the deaths since the beginning of the most recent serial killer storyling on Days of Our Lives. With one exception, they were all vets of the show and were killed off in really unceremonious and even humilating ways (the matriarch of the show, Alice, was choked to death on one of her trademark homemade donuts). Moreover, the deaths were, as far as we can tell, totally pointless, a ratings stunt. I have a lot of respect for Matthew Ashford for refusing to come back and shoot these awful ghost sequences after being fired AGAIN by the same head writer.
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#49

ciscokidinsf

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 11:08 PM

A bad one: The Lone Gunmen on XF.  No.  Just...no.  Pointless, trivializing dismissal of popular supporting players for no apparent reason except to piss off the fans, as far as I can tell.


Vacationland..big WORD! I totally forgotten about that one... I guess they killed them b/c their spin-off show didn't make it... Frohike and company, wherever you are, we miss you dudes!

Also, another sucky sci-fi show death was Professor Maximillian Arturo from Sliders he got canned for disagreeing with the producers... geez.

The Sopranos' better death scenes IMHO were Big Pussy and Ralphie... 'cause Tony himself did the deed on both.

That and the erotic autoasphixiation on Six-Feet Under. too much detail on that one.
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#50

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 11:11 PM

I have to go with Alice Garvey on Little House on the Prairie, not who died, but how she died, in a horrible fire.


plus she tried to escape the fire / call for help by breaking the window open by smashing it with Mary and Adam's baby. So. Very. Wrong.


Oh, Luther Mahoney's death on H:LotS was incredibly effective! Drove the plot and surprised the viewer.


That was an amazing story arc, and it brought us the righteously bitchy and powerful Georgia Rae Mahoney (I lurv me some Hazelle Goodman!)



But I digress. I have to say, I thought the death of Bleeding Gums Murphy on The Simpsons was a little disappointing.

Edited by screamapiller, May 13, 2004 @ 11:12 PM.

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#51

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 11:25 PM

Henry Blake on M*A*S*H was sad and memorable. Especially since it was unexpected and I hear McLean cried for hours and the cast skipped the season ending party because they weren't in the mood.


It wouldn't surprise me. Though I never watched the television show M*A*S*H, the story of MacLean Stevenson's last episode is one I've read in a few places. This site has a pretty good account of what went on behind the scenes leading to his last episode, "Abyssinia, Henry." In a nutshell, none of the actors (except for Alan Alda) knew that Blake would die in a plane crash until just prior to shooting that last scene, so the shock on their faces is real. I've also heard a version that the actors didn't know until the scene was actually filmed and Radar read his line that Blake was dead, but I'm not sure how realistic that is.
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#52

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 11:33 PM

What made Chapelle's death interesting on 24 was like Mason in season 2 he was never really a likable or well liked character but you still felt for him during his death scene, I really felt Paul Schulze pulled it off beautifully.
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#53

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 11:40 PM

Bobby on Third Watch. His death was shocking. I don't think many people knew that he was leaving the show. The worst part was the episode was the Enya music.

Mrs. Landingham and Fitz on The West Wing. With Mrs. Landingham we got Two Cathedrals. Who knows what we'll get with Fitz.
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#54

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Posted May 13, 2004 @ 11:46 PM

A bad one: The Lone Gunmen on XF.  No.  Just...no.  Pointless, trivializing dismissal of popular supporting players for no apparent reason except to piss off the fans, as far as I can tell.


I don't know whether to say WORD or just give in to the fit of apoplexy usually induced by thought of that incredibly mad and stupid move.

*deep, cleansing breath*

I'm ambivalent about Anya's death in BtVS. Thinking of the development her character went through in S4-6 as far as coming to terms with being human and mortal (The Replacement, The Body, still cropping up in Once More With Feeling) it kind of makes sense that she would be the one to die in the end. But she, and by extension that thread, was ignored for so much of S7 and her death was so under-acknowledged that I'm not even confident they intended that connection when they decided to kill her off.
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#55

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Posted May 14, 2004 @ 12:16 AM

I hated Anya's death. I understand wanting to sacrifice a major character in the final battle (one fans didn't know was going to be coming back on Angel in a few months) and I even anticipated her as a likely candidate for the heroic death. But the way they did it: one quick shot and then cut away, no one finds her body and Xander barely reacts when Andrew tells him. It was such a waste of a good character and it seemed so dismissive. I was particularly upset since she was one of the few characters I still fully loved by the end of Season 7. She got more of a "death scene" in The Gift when she was only unconscious.

I also want to add Catherine from Beauty & The Beast, which would have been a great (if horribly sad) death and fitting end to the season -- if they hadn't then decided to try to continue on without the Beauty part of the show's equation.
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#56

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Posted May 14, 2004 @ 12:38 AM

I'm a big sap so this list might be a bit long.

- Mrs. Landingham on The West Wing. The flashbacks and Jed's reaction were just wonderful. Two Cathedrals is one of the finest hours of television ever made.

- Whitney on Smallville. This one just pissed me off - and still does. All the reliable spoilers said that he was going to be MIA not KIA so no one was expecting this. TPTB comments later about how much "fun" it was to kill the character just made it worse.

- Joyce on Buffy. I hadn't watched many episodes before but I decided to tune into this one because I had hear many great things about it. I wasn't disappointed. Buffy's reaction to finding her mother's dead body and the scene where she was telling Dawn what had happened were particularly moving.

- Teri on 24. This was like a sucker punch to the gut. Never in a million years would I have expected them to kill off one of the leads. The scene where Jack sobs and cradles her dead body just broke my heart. The fact that she was my favorite (after Jack, natch) just made it worse.

- George Mason on 24. Aside from the annoying misuse of the silent clock, Mason had the perfect hero's death. For the 12 hours that he was slowly dying we got to know him better and as the perfect end to his redemption arc, he went out a hero. His last speech with his son and Jack made me cry and the image of the mushroom cloud still sends chills down my spine.

- Ryan Chappelle on 24. It'll never happen but Paul Schulze should get an Emmy for this. This episode has to be one of the most tense and disturbing hours of television ever made. I literally felt nauseous by the time the helicopter reached the trainyard. Those final five minutes are really haunting.

He told Jack the only people he felt close to were the people he worked with, and I was just like, "Dude, most of them hated you!"


I'm assuming here he meant the people at the mysterious "Division" because that's where he was based. He just visited CTU LA because it was one of the CTUs under his command as Regional Director.
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#57

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Posted May 14, 2004 @ 12:41 AM

none of the actors (except for Alan Alda) knew that Blake would die in a plane crash until just prior to shooting that last scene, so the shock on their faces is real. I've also heard a version that the actors didn't know until the scene was actually filmed and Radar read his line that Blake was dead, but I'm not sure how realistic that is

The story I've always heard is this: The actors learned of Blake's death at the same moment their characters did (Radar's announcement). The intent was to get genuine responses, but due to a technical glitch, the scene had to be filmed again anyhow.
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#58

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Posted May 14, 2004 @ 1:03 AM

I believe the technical glitch was actually an extra dropping a prop that made a loud noise, so they had to do it over again.
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#59

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Posted May 14, 2004 @ 1:04 AM

Anya on "Buffy," mainly because her death didn't get the respect it deserved. All of the love was shown to Spike in the end, but Anya died for the same purpose and got nothing but a vague conversation between Xander and Andrew.

Said on "OZ." This was one of those moments when I thought, "Now there's no reason to watch." Said was one of those truly complicated and riveting TV characters. It was a shame he chose to leave the show to be in some silly Bruce Willis movie.

Doyle on "Angel. His death was so unexpected and far too soon. Very well-handled, and the repercussions (Cordy's visions) were great. But it was so sad when it happened.

Will on "Alias," at the end of season 2. Thank goodness it was a fake-out.

Tara on "Buffy," because it really really hurt to see Willow just get her back, only to lose her so quickly. And then it hurt even more when she never came back as the First. I still regret that that never happened, when I think back on the final two seasons of "Buffy." I honestly think it would have improved things greatly.

I don't have all of the sadness that many of you do about Cyril dying on "OZ," because, by the time he died, they'd already done the fake-out episode. His real death, then, wasn't so painful.

I thought it was strange when the Warden Glynn died, too. But "OZ" killed so many characters, I guess it would have been more shocking if they didn't die.

I was surprised and even a little bit unhappy when Tony killed Ralphie on "The Sopranos." I hated him so much, but then they made him sympathetic just before they killed him. David Chase is an evil genius. I thought Richie Aprile suffered a particularly shocking death, too, although I wasn't sad about it. I was upset that Olivia died, but that obviously was because the actress who played her had died. There was so much more to be done with her character, though. That was a tough loss for the show, although not for Tony, or me. She was so horrible.
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#60

febutterfly

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Posted May 14, 2004 @ 1:31 AM

Oh, Luther Mahoney's death on H:LotS was incredibly effective! Drove the plot and surprised the viewer.


I agree that Mahoney's death was surprising and drove the plot. I think I'm one of the minority who thinks it drove the plot in the wrong direction, though. This really pissed me off after the show had spent the entire previous season portraying Kellerman as an honorable police officer, finally being cleared of arson and gaining the trust of his co-workers. I felt that his shooting Mahoney in cold blood was completely out of character, and the show never got back on track for me after that. I just couldn't buy the 180-degree shift.

ITA with everyone who's still annoyed at Romano's death on ER. That character deserved a lot better than being turned into a complete bastard with no redeeming qualities, then squished by a helicopter. Was that supposed to be funny?

...Just thought of something else: I'm in the minority and was glad to see Tasha Yar get killed off on ST:TNG. I thought the rest of the characters gelled quite nicely after that. The best part about her death, though, was the suspense it created when other characters were in danger. When Worf had his back surgery and "died", I sobbed my eyes out because I kept thinking "they killed Tasha, they can kill Worf..."

Edited by febutterfly, May 14, 2004 @ 1:35 AM.

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