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#2461

stillshimpy

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Posted Dec 23, 2008 @ 7:36 PM

Looks like it starts in June, 2008, livinggreen. Click here and scroll down. There was also a homeowner named Connie in 06, but that seems to be a different person.

Connie is one of my least favorite homeowners from the show. The Doll Lady I felt a lot of compassion towards, and I was glad everything worked out for that family. She truly seemed to be dealing with a very fragile psyche but her family was exceptionally kind to her, and although she was incredibly peculiar, she wasn't screamingly unpleasant.

Connie was pretty screamingly unpleasant.

#2462

livinggreen

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Posted Dec 23, 2008 @ 8:30 PM

Thank you.

#2463

missdavenport

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Posted Dec 24, 2008 @ 2:10 PM

Connie was pretty screamingly unpleasant.


So was Marie. I just saw her episode a few days ago. She's the woman who wanted to sell her crappy duplex. She had fallen for Ty while she was on vacation in Florida and planned to move down there and marry him. Oh, I hated her. So snotty and rude. She set a price then raised it after she had an offer on the place.

You know a seller is bad when they make you sympathize with the agent. Crazy bitch tried to tell her agent he should lower his commission because he is the rep for the buyers too and as such, it's not any more work for him. IT IS TWICE THE WORK FOR HIM.
She didn't do shit!! Marie also had a 14 year old son who didn't want to go with her to Florida because she had only known Ty for a few days. Funny how some of these teen-age kids seem to have more sense then their parents.

#2464

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Posted Dec 31, 2008 @ 1:25 PM

My TiVo is saying that there will be a new episode this Monday called "An Agent's Own House." I am so excited, and it's seems like it's been forever since we've had a new episode.

#2465

stinkymcgee

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Posted Dec 31, 2008 @ 1:33 PM

My TiVo is saying that there will be a new episode this Monday called "An Agent's Own House." I am so excited, and it's seems like it's been forever since we've had a new episode.

I spotted that last night on my TiVo as well, VaVaVoom, but I didn't want to get my hopes up. Thanks for the confirmation! Much as I love most episodes of Buy Me, there's only so many times I can watch a rerun.

#2466

Anna2

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Posted Jan 4, 2009 @ 1:46 PM

The new episode will debut at 10:30 PM Eastern and repeat at 2:30 AM.

The concept of "insulting" a homeowner with too low an offer is beyond me. The homeowner can accept or reject any offer. It's just business, as Donald Trump would say. There's nothing personal in it. Telling a HO "your house is worth 2/3 what you think it is, and by the way - your mother looks like a Bassett hound" is an insult.

General question to fans of this show who have sold their home: did a low offer "insult" you? Did you feel better about yourself when the offer you accepted came in?

#2467

Suz at Large

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Posted Jan 4, 2009 @ 1:57 PM

General question to fans of this show who have sold their home: did a low offer "insult" you? Did you feel better about yourself when the offer you accepted came in?

OMG, that is so funny!

I have been irritated by a lowball offer when I was selling my house, but not insulted. Because, well, it wasn't about me. It was about the house. Duh.

And when an acceptable offer came in? I felt much happier about the soon-to-be balance in my bank account and relieved to be done with all the efforts to sell the place. My ego wasn't much affected either way.

Edited to remove surplusage.

Edited by Suz at Large, Jan 4, 2009 @ 3:41 PM.


#2468

izabella

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Posted Jan 4, 2009 @ 2:11 PM

A lowball offer is not about insulting your ego - it's insulting your intelligence and common sense and due diligence. As if you hadn't done any research and have no clue what your home is worth in the market. Like you'd accept their crummy offer because you're stupid.

Most people who are serious about selling, HAVE done their research, or their agent has, and when someone comes along who lowballs, yes, it is insulting to the home owner.

When I sold my first condo, the first offer I received was a lowball. It was insulting to my intelligence, and I refused to even counter - in my view, that was not a reasonable buyer and I didn't want to bother negotiating with someone who was hoping I was dumb enough or desperate enough that he could screw me out of its current market value, and probably also would try to nickel and dime me to death along the way to closing. When I sold it a month later, I got the exact price I expected to, because both my agent and I had done our research and knew what it was worth at the time.

#2469

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Posted Jan 4, 2009 @ 3:40 PM

We've seen so many sellers, just on "Buy Me" alone, who chose a selling price based on what they needed to make to buy their next house, or based on what they thought a good profit should be after so many years, that I would never assume that a price had been arrived at by research and comparison of comparables by a competent realtor or seller. The buyer can see for himself or herself whether a house's price is in line with comparables. I've been both a buyer and a seller. As a seller, I would not consider an offer I felt was too low, but I also didn't consider it an aspersion on my intelligence-- just a disagreement on value. Personally, I'd like to at least see the low offer than to see NO offers. And as a buyer I'd make the offer I felt was fair and see where it took me.

I try not to be too personally involved with any property, whether as a buyer or a seller. It's business. Getting too personally invested can cause a seller to reject a fair offer or a buyer to pay too much.

#2470

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Posted Jan 4, 2009 @ 5:32 PM

Telling a HO "your house is worth 2/3 what you think it is, and by the way - your mother looks like a Bassett hound" is an insult.

Bwahahaha!!!

General question to fans of this show who have sold their home: did a low offer "insult" you? Did you feel better about yourself when the offer you accepted came in?

Not at all, because it is, as you said, Just Business. And when I, in turn, go to make an offer on my next property, I will lowball it also. It's called negotiation. Ne-go-ti-ation, Jerry. (Oh how I miss Seinfeld).

#2471

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Posted Jan 4, 2009 @ 6:15 PM

The trouble with that lowball offer is that it isn't based on anything if the house is priced fairly. Buy Me sellers that have received the kindest treatment on TWOP are the ones who price their houses right for the market, or make the proper adjustments if they find out otherwise. TWOPers are just as ready to rip buyers who are behaving irrationally. Homes DO involve emotion. Hell, CARS involve emotion. Lowballing (and I mean seriously underbidding something without basis) just sets a negative tone for everything that follows. The selling price is only the beginning ...

Insulted? Maybe not the right word. I have to say that when it happens, though, it is quite satisfying to be the one who gets to "reject without comment."

#2472

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Posted Jan 4, 2009 @ 6:45 PM

Insults go both ways: The seller who has priced his property too high and the buyer who thinks good negotiations start on an antagonistic note. If a property is competitively priced, a low ball offer is insulting to the seller to a certain degree. At the very least, the seller wonders how serious the buyer is. If a property is over-priced, a smart buyer wonders how dumb the seller thinks the buyer is.

As a Realtor, I tell my clients that the market will talk to them. Generally, this means that sellers will get a sense for whether or not they are priced right if they are getting showings and offers within 5-10% of asking. For buyers, this means that if they insist on writing lowball, uncompetitive offers because they feel that this is the way to buy a house, they'll learn when the sellers refuse to play ball. Negotiations are a two-way street and the best negotiations are a win-win. It is just business, except that it is not. Buyers and sellers have a lot of emotion wrapped up in the process.

I've only seen a few episodes of Buy Me and in each case, the seller was unrealistic and rather venal.

Edited by Sleepy Head, Jan 4, 2009 @ 6:45 PM.


#2473

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Posted Jan 5, 2009 @ 7:54 AM

I have worked with lots of buyers who started off their home buying process by writing up low ball offers. I will write them up and patiently explain to them that their offer has been rejected without being countered, time and time again. And then one day the light bulb will go off and they realize that their approach isn't going to work and they become more realistic.

One other thing I have found is that when buyers write low ball offers on a home it's because they really don't want it. Sure, they would be happy if their low offer was accepted, but that home is not their dream home. That way when it's rejected they don't really care and just move on to the next home. But when they do find that home that they fall in love with, and they don't want to lose it, they will put in a reasonable offer.

I have to laugh when my homeowners get insulted by a low offer, and when their home finally sells and they turn into a buyer they do the exact same thing when writing an offer!

#2474

stinkymcgee

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 10:00 AM

Well, last night's new episode certainly didn't disappoint. Delusional couple overprices home because a) it's So Very Wonderful and b) they "need" to make a killing so that they can retire early. A killing in this market, in the Midwest, with a place that for the most part hasn't been updated since 1975. Yeah, good plan.

I would've thought that the light bulb would go on earlier for them, what with the wife's 20 years in the business and the son's insistence from the get-go that the house was cluttered and overpriced. But then, if it had, we wouldn't have been treated to the repeated mantra of "these buyers are all bland and boring and cookie-cutter and that's why they're not snapping up the place."

Well, color me all three of the above then; because I thought having the master off the kitchen, with the other bedrooms in the basement and a dingy apartment on half of the floor above, was a most unworkable floor plan. Even if they HAD made more updates, I still wouldn't have liked it.

#2475

Suz at Large

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 10:06 AM

Well, last night's new episode certainly didn't disappoint. Delusional couple overprices home because a) it's So Very Wonderful and b) they "need" to make a killing so that they can retire early. A killing in this market, in the Midwest, with a place that for the most part hasn't been updated since 1975. Yeah, good plan.

Oh, dang! I really wanted to see this one, had real life non-television things to do during its first showing, so I missed it. And then I fell asleep before the second showing came on.

This business of real life - family, work, pets, etc. - sure does complicate TV watching.

I need help here people. I need good reasons for splurging for DVR in these difficult economic times! Without jacking this thread, of course.

#2476

stillshimpy

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 11:30 AM

Suz at Large, what you might want to consider is a digital cable package if your cable company offers DVRs. We've got one Tivo and one Comcast DVR digital box. The Comcast DVR doesn't have quite as much program storage, and lacks a lot of the bells and whistles of the Tivo (we have it wirelessly hooked up to the internet, and can do some fun things with that, like download from Netflix, etc.) However, the Comcast box gets the job done for just recording programs and it costs us all of four bucks a month etc. on top of what we'd be paying for a digital HD box in that room anyway. Just some food for thought, check out your local cable companies DVR options and go from there. That way you'd be able to catch all the Buy Me showings and watch at your leisure.

Holy smokes, that couple in Chicago was not being realistic at all. However, I'm just not sure they ever even wanted to sell, and they are much better off waiting for an upturn in the market. I liked the family, and I liked how much they clearly adored their home, even though it was a completely unrealistic viewpoint. I'm half wondering if part of the reason they did this was just to get their real estate agent son some TV exposure. If I was the betting type, I'd be tempted to lay money down on that one because they clearly weren't prepared to let go, and move on for a reasonable sum.

The place was priced 100k over what the market would bear, and I just don't believe that couple was quite that delusional. The in-law suite didn't look as if it had been touched since the early seventies and it was depressing as could be. There is just no freaking way that woman truly believed she was going to get more than the comps. in the area with that drug on the market sitting atop their home. It looked like the set from a bad existentialist film from the seventies.

I liked the strange little configuration of the home, but it was really dated, and things that scream seventies quite that loudly just scream remodeling to potential buyers. Yeah, I really do think they just wanted to give the son's real estate business exposure a boost. They all seemed like smart, savvy people, and to get top dollar that place needed to be finished to the nines. I'm having a really hard time believing that all involved didn't know that absolutely. The episode ultimately proves the son entirely right, but he's kind and respectful to his parents throughout, no one truly comes off in a bad light. I really don't think selling was ever the goal there.

That mother in-law suite looked like it should be used to the hide the Franks, for goodness sakes. It was depressing as all get out.

ETA: Wait! There was one "in a bad light" moment, ma'am, please throw away the forty-year-old spices if you ever want to have guests for dinner again. That was gross.

Edited by stillshimpy, Jan 6, 2009 @ 11:45 AM.


#2477

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 12:31 PM

I knew she was going to be "one of those sellers" the minute she said, "There's a lot of me in this house." She's a prime example of why most lawyers shouldn't represent themselves, doctors shouldn't treat themselves and real estate agents shouldn't attempt to sell their own houses. All the knowledge and job smarts goes right out the window when you're emotionally invested.

I think if you have to explain your house you've already lost the battle. Would anyone have been able to tell that an architect had been involved in that design if they hadn't told us? Would anybody care that there was a "boomerang staircase" and a big round cutout in the wall when the layout of the house was so odd and everything was so dated?

I liked the son. He seemd smart and savvy for just 2 years in the business.

I could not be married to a packrat. Just couldn't do it.

#2478

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 12:41 PM

I liked the son. He seemd smart and savvy for just 2 years in the business.


Yes, but I wonder if the "cookie cutter" people he was sneering at, and who may have been watching, decided to never use his services.

#2479

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 12:44 PM

They seemed like an interesting family. The parents were still very attached to their house--they weren't ready to leave. You could see it from the get-go.

The son did his best. I was impressed with him. I was so excited to see a new episode! (sad, perhaps ...but I was.)

#2480

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 12:50 PM

I also couldn't understand how, as a real estate agent herself, she wouldn't know she was totally over-priced for the market. I guess they were hoping some "unique" buyer would come in and fall in love with the place, or, as some of you have guessed, they weren't really serious about selling.

They did have a lovely greystone, and those are highly coveted here in Chicago, especially if they're on a great street in a great location, like theirs. But there has also been a lot of new construction, so any buyer is going to be thinking: nearly 100 year old house, no updates since 1975, that's going to mean lack of closet space, potentially needing new wiring, etc. They have competition not only from the new construction, but also from the gut rehabs that have been done on many greystones for sale. It's not a small undertaking.

#2481

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 1:23 PM

It it certainly a possibility that they were trying to get exposure for the son. He was quite ... photogenic. Too bad I'm not looking for a house in Chicago or I might have to see about employing his services.

Anyhoo, at first I thought they were going to bug me, but they were really pretty sweet. I think maybe the mom just thought it was worth a shot -- if they could get that much for the house, then fine, they'd take it and move on, but if not, they were just as happy staying.

Anyway, great to see a new episode. Long live Buy Me!

#2482

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 3:45 PM

It it certainly a possibility that they were trying to get exposure for the son. He was quite ... photogenic.

This piqued my interest (yes, I am very shallow!).

This episode won't repeat until March 20. Perhaps there is a whole new season coming? Well, maybe not. I just checked. This ep was 801. Then there are some 300's, 500's and 600's before the next 800. The schedule is all over the place.

I do like this show for the snark factor, but I keep forgetting that it is on. I did catch the doll lady ep. I was astounded that anyone would buy that place. The work just to get it back to zero was going to be huge.

Amazingly, I didn't hate her. I more felt for her, as she appeared to be very...eccentric. At least her husband and her son were kind and tolerant of her eccentricities. There is no way I could have lived in that house with all of that clutter and those creepy dolls all over the house.

#2483

HawaiiTVGuy

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 4:10 PM

The downsizing episode with Noreen was heartbreaking. I felt so bad about all the bad luck she has had. Admittedly she should not have bought the second house before selling the first, but over all, a heart breaking story.
Oh, and I didn't see the whole episode, but from what I saw, her daughter was a brat.

Edited by HawaiiTVGuy, Jan 7, 2009 @ 3:24 PM.


#2484

stinkymcgee

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 4:14 PM

from what I saw, her daughter was a brat.

Was that the one where the daughter flat-out REFUSED to clean her room, and it always looked as though wild animals were living in it? If so, I agree with you, HawaiiTVGuy.

#2485

stillshimpy

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Posted Jan 6, 2009 @ 4:25 PM

That episode with Noreen was heart wrenching. I know she lived quite a lavish lifestyle, but it truly seemed as if prior to having cancer she made the money to support it. Plus, she really was very level-headed and didn't seem to blame anyone for her misfortunes, including the company firing her after twenty-five years when she returned from longterm disability.

Her daughter was a brat, but she was at a super difficult age. Not old enough to fully get how sick her mother had been or what it could have meant for her future (as the dad seemed to be nowhere in the picture) had her mother died. I think realistically that daughter was acting out a lot because she was angry about the change in lifestyle, and she's young enough to blame her mom for having cancer instead of feeling sympathy.

I think the reason I'm inclined to cut the kid a break is because at 13 she just wasn't quite old enough to have developed the necessary empathy to be of any use. She just resented her mom. Hopefully she'll grow up and that will change. I don't really know what I was like when I was thirteen, I didn't come from that privileged a background, for starters, but I also never faced anything like that kind of emotional challenge and I have no clue how I would have reacted. From the kid's standpoint her mother just stopped being sick all the time and now they have to get rid of their sweet house? I can see that causing a lot of anger in a thirteen-year-old. Not saying it's justified, just saying that it is understandable how it could have occurred. She was just a bit too young to really get the possible repercussions of her mom's illness.

That all said, I freaking cried when that little girl rolled her eyes and said her mom was the most embarrassing person on earth. That's when it really hit me that she just did not understand at all how very lucky she was to still have her mom.

Also, Noreen's real estate agent was so kind and patient with her. Noreen was likable, also. When she really put on the dog for the agent's open house, I couldn't help but like her. Or her very philosophical "If I've learned one thing, it's that agents don't like sandwiches." as she had to toss pounds of them.

#2486

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Posted Jan 7, 2009 @ 3:27 PM

Was that the one where the daughter flat-out REFUSED to clean her room, and it always looked as though wild animals were living in it? If so, I agree with you, HawaiiTVGuy.

Yup you are right, that is the one.
shimpy, I agree with you, she is only a teenager and probably should be cut some slack, but understanding that she is a typical teenager and not being annoyed by it are two separate things. :) So did Noreen get to sell her house? Please tell me she at least had that go her way because it was a really really nice house.

#2487

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Posted Jan 7, 2009 @ 5:55 PM

Noreen did sell her house and for enough that even though she wasn't well into the black, she was importantly not in the red. She covered her mortgage, the agent's commission and she did it all in a time period where she did not have to carry two mortgages for very long. The episode left her exploring a catering career in her new home. The people that bought the home we're definitely moving on up, a nice family with the kids very excited about the pool, hot tub, etc. of the new house. They paid in the upper 700s and negotiated for some (not all) of the family room furniture. They were filmed very enthusiastically watching TV in there. I think they might have been risking some over extending of their own (no real way to tell) but I wished them well. They seemed remarkably happy.

Noreen's daughter was filmed saying that her mother was lucky to have her. She really just came off as so very kid-like. She was not a world wise young girl, and that's probably for the best. I do agree, she was annoying, and a tiny bit heartbreaking when you think of the impact that a lot of that will have on her mom. Still, she was taking it all with a kid-proportion view and overall, that's probably best for her in the long run. Doesn't make her charming, or anything of that nature, but it makes her ...what...recognizable as within the scope of understandable human behavior, I guess.

#2488

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Posted Jan 8, 2009 @ 10:46 AM

I haven't watched this show in ages, since HGTV in Canada took it from its 7:30 p.m. weekday slot. But I caught one today, with a Greek couple in their 30s who wanted to sell their condo. They had Cowboyd as their agent and bitched endlessly about how all he wanted to do was lower the price.

Typically, they overpriced it. They paid $215,000 for it only a year earlier, put $20,000 into it (and it could have used another $20,000 of fixups and upgrades, IMO), and wanted $319,000 for it. Naturally, it was the agent's fault that condos all over the neighbourhood were selling and theirs was not. A couple touring their open house even mumbled, "This is $60,000 more". Of course, they dropped the agent and eventually sold it, but they lost their dream house in the process. I was happy about that, as snotty as it sounds.

What irked me was at the end, the guys says something like how they had hoped to get $250,000 for it, but getting $289,000 was such a bonus! Asshole. Why not drop the price right away to $265,000, still get more than you hoped for, and then be able to get your dream house and move in before September? Instead, they bitch and moan, and cry about their kid not starting school, and broken dreams. Ugh.

#2489

stinkymcgee

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Posted Jan 12, 2009 @ 9:02 PM

Okay, tonight's Hindu couple? I wanted to punch both of them. It just fries me when young first-time home buyers are scoffing at and refusing things that are nicer than any home I've ever lived in. A house that's *gasp* fourteen years old? Oh, waaaaay too outdated for us. A 2600 square foot townhouse with a ton of oak cabinets and Corian countertops? Well, <sigh>, I suppose we could upgrade them to granite.

I would've had a VERY hard time being as gracious as Sandra, wishing them well when they decided they were just too, too busy to buy a half-million dollar home and plan their wedding too. 'Cause, deep inside, I totally would've been wishing them a few years in a rat-infested basement flat.

eta: Damnation. I could've sworn I clicked on the PV thread. Never mind.

Edited by stinkymcgee, Jan 13, 2009 @ 9:19 AM.


#2490

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Posted Jan 12, 2009 @ 10:35 PM

Okay, tonight's Hindu couple? I wanted to punch both of them. It just fries me when young first-time home buyers are scoffing at and refusing things that are nicer than any home I've ever lived in. A house that's *gasp* fourteen years old? Oh, waaaaay too outdated for us. A 2600 square foot townhouse with a ton of oak cabinets and Corian countertops? Well, <sigh>, I suppose we could upgrade them to granite.

I would've had a VERY hard time being as gracious as Sandra, wishing them well when they decided they were just too, too busy to buy a half-million dollar home and plan their wedding too. 'Cause, deep inside, I totally would've been wishing them a few years in a rat-infested basement flat.


I felt the same way, but that was actually Property Virgins. It's hard to keep all these shows straight.